Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 133286 times)

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Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #750 on: April 28, 2013, 06:40:50 AM »
I had lobster for the first time when I was nine... and I've been hooked ever since!

artk2002

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #751 on: April 28, 2013, 09:22:12 AM »
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
When my daughters were staying with DH's parents for a week, MIL and FIL ate lobster two nights, and gave the girls hot dogs.  Lobsters that they were GIVEN, 4 of them.  So it wasn't a case of "I don't want to buy lobster for kids that might not eat them."  And my girls were 9 and 12, old enough to be adventurous about eating all kinds of things, not just PBJ and cold cereal.

Unless I knew the girls liked lobster for sure before cooking them, I would have made something different for a 9 and 12 year old, too. Even if they were an adventurous eater. And even if the lobsters were given to me.

It is a major sin of hosting to serve yourself the "good stuff" and your guests something lesser. If the grandparents didn't think that the girls would like lobster, then everybody should have gotten hot dogs.
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Luci45

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #752 on: April 28, 2013, 10:46:50 AM »
I know two people that this happened to: The host at the bar-b-que bought steaks for himself and hot dogs for everyone else.
When my daughters were staying with DH's parents for a week, MIL and FIL ate lobster two nights, and gave the girls hot dogs.  Lobsters that they were GIVEN, 4 of them.  So it wasn't a case of "I don't want to buy lobster for kids that might not eat them."  And my girls were 9 and 12, old enough to be adventurous about eating all kinds of things, not just PBJ and cold cereal.

Unless I knew the girls liked lobster for sure before cooking them, I would have made something different for a 9 and 12 year old, too. Even if they were an adventurous eater. And even if the lobsters were given to me.

It is a major sin of hosting to serve yourself the "good stuff" and your guests something lesser. If the grandparents didn't think that the girls would like lobster, then everybody should have gotten hot dogs.

We give the kids a choice. One granddaughter polished off half a filet mignon at 4 years old, and at 20 still chooses the filet, and one grandson at 12 honestly prefers a hamburger, or may even eat a jelly sandwich if I happen to think to offer him one.

Thipu1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #753 on: April 28, 2013, 11:20:27 AM »
I had lobster for the first time when I was nine... and I've been hooked ever since!

My father did something similar to me.  He loved raw clams.  When I was four, he gave me my first and he always regretted it.  From that point on, I could eat raw clams as fast as he could shuck them. 

He should have figured it out.  When I was christened as an infant, one of the rituals involved putting a grain of salt on the baby's tongue.  Usually, the baby starts crying.  According to family lore, I just rolled it around in my mouth and looked rather pleased. 

Venus193

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #754 on: April 28, 2013, 02:19:44 PM »
I am a major fan of the crustacean...

VorFemme

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #755 on: April 28, 2013, 02:47:22 PM »
One brother is allergic to seafood - that's fine - Lil Sis and I will split his share!  But if either of us develops allergies.....we're in trouble.  Sweet & Sour Shrimp is not the same as Sweet & Sour Chicken or Pork - granted, all three are GOOD.  But Shrimp anything is better!
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #756 on: April 29, 2013, 07:30:11 AM »
In my FOO, seafood was a big part of the diet, being raised on the east coast and my maternal grandparents living right on a river where we could catch blue crabs and Granddaddy would go fishing.   And I think for about a year or so we lived in Florida and I'm told I ate raw oysters and loved them.  I still do, actually.  I can't think of a type of seafood I've tried and didn't like. 

My older two love crabs and seafood too, and the baby likes fish but hasn't had a chance to try crab just yet.
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Slartibartfast

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #757 on: April 29, 2013, 08:21:14 AM »
Oddly enough, crab is the one food we've found that Bittybartfast won't eat - and she eats EVERYTHING.  Including horseradish, braunschwager, curry, green peppers, cilantro, and a whole host of other things many adults won't even eat.

SamiHami

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #758 on: April 29, 2013, 11:33:24 AM »
When I'm tired and grumpy, I always find myself thinking "Man, I'd pay 10% more if I could only find all this stuff under one roof."

I'm like this, nowadays, too.  DH and I waited a few weeks until we had two 20% off coupons for BB&B so we could buy two sets of service for 8 flatware and save $40.  However, I didn't think to also bring in the 10% off coupon we had, and we also purchased some napkins and placemats at full price.  I thought about it briefly, realized that BB&B is nowhere we are normally and figured it wasn't worth saving about $2 to have to make another trip out there when, really, we'd been to BB&B around 3-4 times since we got together 4+ years ago.

However, years ago, I used to be the person who would do whatever I could to save money and spent lots of time "chasing the sales."  It really wore me out though.  I don't have the time or patience now (still want to save money, but I'm fine with paying a little more if everything I need is at one or two locations).  Still, for our wedding, I checked the cost of renting vs. purchasing several things, like table linens and chair covers and found, for most things, it was cheaper to buy what we needed.  We now have things like 100 chair covers (about 20 brand-new) and 100 chair sashes, but, sadly it would've cost us more to rent them.  I figure we'll try to sell them at some point, but I certainly wasn't going to pay more to rent them and have nothing to show for it at the end (we won't be giving them away either because we did pay something for them so I want to recoup some of our expenses).

This isn't quite a cheapskate story (unless the shop owner was the one to tell it), but my and DH's engagement and wedding rings, altogether, cost us around $300.  Neither of us are into jewelry, and I saw no point in spending lots of money on something, while meaningful in its symbolism, means nothing to me as far as precious metals are concerned.  The store owner, when we ordered our wedding bands, kept making cracks about us calling him to "upgrade" our rings to gold in a few years when we could afford it.  I finally got annoyed enough to shut him down and tell him, "I don't care about jewelry so this as good as it's going to get.  I received as my 'engagement gift' a nice car that I really needed, which is what I told DH I wanted, is parked outside and suits me much better."  Stupid man shut up but also cost himself any future business from us for intimating we were cheap or penniless or both (it was an Irish store, not a jewelry store -- we were ordering Celtic wedding bands from Ireland).  For the record (which I didn't tell the stupid man), DH wanted to buy me an expensive (for us) engagement ring.  I turned him down and said that if wanted to get me something "big" to get me a car as it was much more practical and something I needed...so he got me a car (I pointed out I couldn't very well drive a ring and would feel stupid riding around in public transportation because I couldn't afford a car yet was sporting an expensive ring).

This might be cheapskate, but honestly I don't care. When we got engaged decades ago DH wanted me to help pick out my engagement ring (smart man...he figured since I'm the one who has to wear it forever I should have some input!). We looked around a lot of places, and of course being young and not exactly rich couldn't afford a lot, not that I was demanding anything. One store he took me to was a pawn shop, where I actually got a really nice diamond solitaire for an excellent price. It was twice the size of other stones in regular retail jewelry stores. I have had it appraised for insurance purposes and we got an excellent deal. I thought I'd feel weird about wearing a "used" ring, but you know what? It was new to me, and I've been wearing it for 27 years now.

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RobinduBois

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #759 on: April 29, 2013, 11:47:53 AM »
This is a slight digression, but still relevant to this thread.  At one point in the film Gangs of New York, Leonardo DiCaprio's character happily ignores a variety of insults thrown at him, but gets into a fist-fight with a man who calls him a "chiseler".  Since this word is not well-known in British English, I'm not clear exactly how rude it is considered.  Is it a term that wouldn't be used in polite society, or is it simply a synonym for "cheapskate" (which I would consider relatively mild)?

Thanks,

Robin

dawbs

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #760 on: April 29, 2013, 11:53:16 AM »
This is a slight digression, but still relevant to this thread.  At one point in the film Gangs of New York, Leonardo DiCaprio's character happily ignores a variety of insults thrown at him, but gets into a fist-fight with a man who calls him a "chiseler".  Since this word is not well-known in British English, I'm not clear exactly how rude it is considered.  Is it a term that wouldn't be used in polite society, or is it simply a synonym for "cheapskate" (which I would consider relatively mild)?

Thanks,

Robin

I'd say that in that context it means 'thief' more than it means 'penny pincher'--it's not just cheap, it's a swindle and a deception thing.
I also think that, historically (assume some historical context ;), it may have some of the racial/irish slur associations with it too.

Browyn

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #761 on: April 29, 2013, 12:30:14 PM »
When I'm tired and grumpy, I always find myself thinking "Man, I'd pay 10% more if I could only find all this stuff under one roof."

I'm like this, nowadays, too.  DH and I waited a few weeks until we had two 20% off coupons for BB&B so we could buy two sets of service for 8 flatware and save $40.  However, I didn't think to also bring in the 10% off coupon we had, and we also purchased some napkins and placemats at full price.  I thought about it briefly, realized that BB&B is nowhere we are normally and figured it wasn't worth saving about $2 to have to make another trip out there when, really, we'd been to BB&B around 3-4 times since we got together 4+ years ago.

However, years ago, I used to be the person who would do whatever I could to save money and spent lots of time "chasing the sales."  It really wore me out though.  I don't have the time or patience now (still want to save money, but I'm fine with paying a little more if everything I need is at one or two locations).  Still, for our wedding, I checked the cost of renting vs. purchasing several things, like table linens and chair covers and found, for most things, it was cheaper to buy what we needed.  We now have things like 100 chair covers (about 20 brand-new) and 100 chair sashes, but, sadly it would've cost us more to rent them.  I figure we'll try to sell them at some point, but I certainly wasn't going to pay more to rent them and have nothing to show for it at the end (we won't be giving them away either because we did pay something for them so I want to recoup some of our expenses).

This isn't quite a cheapskate story (unless the shop owner was the one to tell it), but my and DH's engagement and wedding rings, altogether, cost us around $300.  Neither of us are into jewelry, and I saw no point in spending lots of money on something, while meaningful in its symbolism, means nothing to me as far as precious metals are concerned.  The store owner, when we ordered our wedding bands, kept making cracks about us calling him to "upgrade" our rings to gold in a few years when we could afford it.  I finally got annoyed enough to shut him down and tell him, "I don't care about jewelry so this as good as it's going to get.  I received as my 'engagement gift' a nice car that I really needed, which is what I told DH I wanted, is parked outside and suits me much better."  Stupid man shut up but also cost himself any future business from us for intimating we were cheap or penniless or both (it was an Irish store, not a jewelry store -- we were ordering Celtic wedding bands from Ireland).  For the record (which I didn't tell the stupid man), DH wanted to buy me an expensive (for us) engagement ring.  I turned him down and said that if wanted to get me something "big" to get me a car as it was much more practical and something I needed...so he got me a car (I pointed out I couldn't very well drive a ring and would feel stupid riding around in public transportation because I couldn't afford a car yet was sporting an expensive ring).

That's not cheap - its frugal.  I have a 3 ring binder with the plastic pocket sheets in it like they use to collect baseball cards.  I organize all my coupons so when I go shopping I have them at my fingertips.  I may only save 10-25 dollars each shopping trip but over the course of the year that is real money!

Kimblee

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #762 on: April 29, 2013, 01:40:45 PM »
Friend, finding the surplus hot water, insisted in putting it into a thermos flask to keep it hot until a future occasion when hot water would be wanted.

I could see myself doing this, too, but it's more the guilt of not conserving water, rather than just trying to save money (everyone pays the same rate in our area -- no meters -- so it wouldn't save us any money).  I don't actually do it though.  I feel guilty about wasting water these days, but I don't do anything to conserve it (I just dump it, like if it's in a measuring cup or spoon and I didn't need that much).

Get a bean plant.

My mom planted three lima beans in a pot in our kitchen when i was a kid (in a pretty substantial pot, I think it had been a four gallon bucket of frosting) and dumped any "over measured" water on it.

Which is why some of my childhood pictures have a bunch of vines and beanpods hanging off thew kitchen window.

gramma dishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #763 on: April 29, 2013, 02:08:43 PM »

...   Get a bean plant.

My mom planted three lima beans in a pot in our kitchen when i was a kid (in a pretty substantial pot, I think it had been a four gallon bucket of frosting) and dumped any "over measured" water on it.

Which is why some of my childhood pictures have a bunch of vines and beanpods hanging off thew kitchen window.

Fee fi fo fum!   ;D
« Last Edit: April 29, 2013, 02:12:17 PM by gramma dishes »

Thipu1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #764 on: April 29, 2013, 02:46:28 PM »
This is a slight digression, but still relevant to this thread.  At one point in the film Gangs of New York, Leonardo DiCaprio's character happily ignores a variety of insults thrown at him, but gets into a fist-fight with a man who calls him a "chiseler".  Since this word is not well-known in British English, I'm not clear exactly how rude it is considered.  Is it a term that wouldn't be used in polite society, or is it simply a synonym for "cheapskate" (which I would consider relatively mild)?

Thanks,

Robin

I'd say that in that context it means 'thief' more than it means 'penny pincher'--it's not just cheap, it's a swindle and a deception thing.
I also think that, historically (assume some historical context ;), it may have some of the racial/irish slur associations with it too.

'Chiseler' can be considered very close to 'grifter'.  It's used to describe a sly, manipulative person who can't be trusted as far as you can throw him.

It 's definitely Irish and was used by Irish people themselves.  I seem to recall that James Joyce used the term.