Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 216789 times)

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ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #810 on: July 31, 2013, 11:34:18 AM »
I see that a lot with "suggested" household budgets. For example, $100 in groceries should feed a family of four for a week. I'm not sure where these people are, ages and other particulars, but we (DH, DS & I) spend $150 - 200 per week on food. We don't eat expensive cuts of meat or all organic, or all name brands either.

I could feed us on that for a week, by taking shortcuts, substituting more grains instead of vegetables, but I think that is an unrealistic number to throw around and nearly every budget book I have seen uses $100 per week for four people.

Shalamar

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #811 on: July 31, 2013, 11:34:29 AM »
Yeah, when I told a friend how much it cost to take my family of four to Disney World and Universal Studios last year, he looked at me like I was insane and said "I'm sure I can do better than that."   I said "Really?   I got a deal on the park passes (nothing shady; I used AirMiles), rented a house instead of using a hotel so that we could prepare some of our own meals, and used a coupon code for the car rental."   He's still convinced that he can do better.   We shall see!

Cami

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #812 on: July 31, 2013, 11:58:51 AM »
The next day she called and said she was doing the math in her head and it didn't add up. She figured the 100 was good enough for both, and she thought we should give back at least the other 100, but the whole 130 would be better, since they had to buy food and stuff too. I told her she was welcome to come examine the receipts, but if she did I would charge her half of what we actually spent, rather than the rough estimate we'd worked out to be done with it.

I guess she look some things up because we never heard another word about it.
Miss Tickle, I would be shocked at the audacity of your 'friends' except I'm starting to wonder if cheapskates also don't realize what things cost. My brother is not a cheapskate but he can be a little cheap. I remember him telling me that going to Disney World is not as expensive as I was making it out to be.

Now mind you, we lived a couple hours from Disney growing up and he only went with myself and our parents. I was talking about going to Disney from out-of-state, motels, gas, tickets for four persons, etc. He only remembered going with our parents footing the bill for everything. When I explained it would be $2000 for a week, he was shocked -shocked, I tell you! Those were the prices from over 10 years ago, anyway.
I think the bolded is part of it. If you're a cheapskate, you don't spend money. If you not buying stuff, you don't know what it costs or at least, what it costs NOW.  You have no idea of the relative value or when a deal is really a deal. Two examples:

1. My MIL (the worst cheapskate I ever hope to meet on this planet or any other) would never fly anywhere because it was "too expensive". At one point, she had to travel to a location and made these elaborate and time-consuming plans to avoid flying "because it's too expensive." Her BIL looked up the flight costs and it turned out that Southwest was having a promotion or some such and the roundtrip ticket was all of $59. FIFTY-NINE DOLLARS. She kept insisting that was too much money and that $59 was a very expensive airline ticket. Her BIL then pointed out what she'd be spending in gas, lodging, and food to get to her destination and while she then did acknowledge that $59 was cheaper than her plan, she still thought $59 was an OUTRAGEOUS sum to fly nearly across the country. When BIL pointed out that he'd just flown the month before, exact same route, and had spent $250, well, she was convinced he was a profligate spender who didn't know how to budget.

2. My father was convinced when we bought our house that the $99K it cost was ridiculous, that we were stupid fools for paying that much, and that our bank must be staffed by idiots to agree to a mortgage because and I quote, "No normal house is worth $99K. Sure, a mansion  maybe. But a regular house? NO regular house costs more than $25K." When my mother then showed hiim the Sunday paper listings for houses, he blustered and flustered and insisted that the listed prices were "inflated" and "any fool" could dicker ANY house down to no more than $25K. Because that is what they'd paid for their house when they'd bought it 20 years before.

Lorelei_Evil

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #813 on: July 31, 2013, 12:38:34 PM »
We're related, aren't we?  You have to be talking about relatives of mine, right?


ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #814 on: July 31, 2013, 12:41:53 PM »
Oh, the absence of reality cheapskates.

My father wants desperately to go on an Alaska cruise, but my mom thinks it is too expensive. After all, they would have to fly to a foreign country (Canada) to embark on the cruise and that is very expensive. They have passports already, and I found a cheaper way for them to fly to Seattle from their home town, then take the train to the port. Would save nearly $600 per person. The cruises are a good price as well and they can afford it. But, it is too expensive because my mom wants prices the way they were in the 1960's.

I want to tell her to live while she can, spend my inheritance and enjoy her life!

nuit93

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #815 on: July 31, 2013, 12:45:02 PM »
The next day she called and said she was doing the math in her head and it didn't add up. She figured the 100 was good enough for both, and she thought we should give back at least the other 100, but the whole 130 would be better, since they had to buy food and stuff too. I told her she was welcome to come examine the receipts, but if she did I would charge her half of what we actually spent, rather than the rough estimate we'd worked out to be done with it.

I guess she look some things up because we never heard another word about it.
Miss Tickle, I would be shocked at the audacity of your 'friends' except I'm starting to wonder if cheapskates also don't realize what things cost. My brother is not a cheapskate but he can be a little cheap. I remember him telling me that going to Disney World is not as expensive as I was making it out to be.

Now mind you, we lived a couple hours from Disney growing up and he only went with myself and our parents. I was talking about going to Disney from out-of-state, motels, gas, tickets for four persons, etc. He only remembered going with our parents footing the bill for everything. When I explained it would be $2000 for a week, he was shocked -shocked, I tell you! Those were the prices from over 10 years ago, anyway.
I think the bolded is part of it. If you're a cheapskate, you don't spend money. If you not buying stuff, you don't know what it costs or at least, what it costs NOW.  You have no idea of the relative value or when a deal is really a deal. Two examples:

1. My MIL (the worst cheapskate I ever hope to meet on this planet or any other) would never fly anywhere because it was "too expensive". At one point, she had to travel to a location and made these elaborate and time-consuming plans to avoid flying "because it's too expensive." Her BIL looked up the flight costs and it turned out that Southwest was having a promotion or some such and the roundtrip ticket was all of $59. FIFTY-NINE DOLLARS. She kept insisting that was too much money and that $59 was a very expensive airline ticket. Her BIL then pointed out what she'd be spending in gas, lodging, and food to get to her destination and while she then did acknowledge that $59 was cheaper than her plan, she still thought $59 was an OUTRAGEOUS sum to fly nearly across the country. When BIL pointed out that he'd just flown the month before, exact same route, and had spent $250, well, she was convinced he was a profligate spender who didn't know how to budget.

2. My father was convinced when we bought our house that the $99K it cost was ridiculous, that we were stupid fools for paying that much, and that our bank must be staffed by idiots to agree to a mortgage because and I quote, "No normal house is worth $99K. Sure, a mansion  maybe. But a regular house? NO regular house costs more than $25K." When my mother then showed hiim the Sunday paper listings for houses, he blustered and flustered and insisted that the listed prices were "inflated" and "any fool" could dicker ANY house down to no more than $25K. Because that is what they'd paid for their house when they'd bought it 20 years before.

Your father would burst a blood vessel if he saw home prices where I live (King County, Washington).

Isilleke

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #816 on: July 31, 2013, 01:38:08 PM »
I had a (lazy) cheapskate friend once...

We met while in highschool and stayed friends a couple of years after. The only thing we did was hang out at his house, since he didn't want to come to me (I have a buss pass, he doesn't) and didn't want to go out since everything is so expensive.

When I started telling him I wasn't coming to his house and that he could come to mine or we could meet up in the middle, it was too much to ask apparently, because very soon I didn't hear from him anymore.

Just in reference, it's about 8 kilometers so doable by bike (which I don't like at all, hence the buss pass) from my house to his house. He also had a motorbike his parents payed for, but he didn't like to waste gas. 

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #817 on: July 31, 2013, 01:44:15 PM »
The next day she called and said she was doing the math in her head and it didn't add up. She figured the 100 was good enough for both, and she thought we should give back at least the other 100, but the whole 130 would be better, since they had to buy food and stuff too. I told her she was welcome to come examine the receipts, but if she did I would charge her half of what we actually spent, rather than the rough estimate we'd worked out to be done with it.

I guess she look some things up because we never heard another word about it.
Miss Tickle, I would be shocked at the audacity of your 'friends' except I'm starting to wonder if cheapskates also don't realize what things cost. My brother is not a cheapskate but he can be a little cheap. I remember him telling me that going to Disney World is not as expensive as I was making it out to be.

Now mind you, we lived a couple hours from Disney growing up and he only went with myself and our parents. I was talking about going to Disney from out-of-state, motels, gas, tickets for four persons, etc. He only remembered going with our parents footing the bill for everything. When I explained it would be $2000 for a week, he was shocked -shocked, I tell you! Those were the prices from over 10 years ago, anyway.
I think the bolded is part of it. If you're a cheapskate, you don't spend money. If you not buying stuff, you don't know what it costs or at least, what it costs NOW.  You have no idea of the relative value or when a deal is really a deal. Two examples:

1. My MIL (the worst cheapskate I ever hope to meet on this planet or any other) would never fly anywhere because it was "too expensive". At one point, she had to travel to a location and made these elaborate and time-consuming plans to avoid flying "because it's too expensive." Her BIL looked up the flight costs and it turned out that Southwest was having a promotion or some such and the roundtrip ticket was all of $59. FIFTY-NINE DOLLARS. She kept insisting that was too much money and that $59 was a very expensive airline ticket. Her BIL then pointed out what she'd be spending in gas, lodging, and food to get to her destination and while she then did acknowledge that $59 was cheaper than her plan, she still thought $59 was an OUTRAGEOUS sum to fly nearly across the country. When BIL pointed out that he'd just flown the month before, exact same route, and had spent $250, well, she was convinced he was a profligate spender who didn't know how to budget.

2. My father was convinced when we bought our house that the $99K it cost was ridiculous, that we were stupid fools for paying that much, and that our bank must be staffed by idiots to agree to a mortgage because and I quote, "No normal house is worth $99K. Sure, a mansion  maybe. But a regular house? NO regular house costs more than $25K." When my mother then showed hiim the Sunday paper listings for houses, he blustered and flustered and insisted that the listed prices were "inflated" and "any fool" could dicker ANY house down to no more than $25K. Because that is what they'd paid for their house when they'd bought it 20 years before.

Your father would burst a blood vessel if he saw home prices where I live (King County, Washington).

Or me, in Northern NJ. You can't buy squat here, and I'm not talking mansion, in the county I live in, or any of the surrounding ones, for much less than 200K, and even that is pushing it.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #818 on: July 31, 2013, 01:53:58 PM »
1. My MIL (the worst cheapskate I ever hope to meet on this planet or any other) would never fly anywhere because it was "too expensive". At one point, she had to travel to a location and made these elaborate and time-consuming plans to avoid flying "because it's too expensive." Her BIL looked up the flight costs and it turned out that Southwest was having a promotion or some such and the roundtrip ticket was all of $59. FIFTY-NINE DOLLARS. She kept insisting that was too much money and that $59 was a very expensive airline ticket. Her BIL then pointed out what she'd be spending in gas, lodging, and food to get to her destination and while she then did acknowledge that $59 was cheaper than her plan, she still thought $59 was an OUTRAGEOUS sum to fly nearly across the country. When BIL pointed out that he'd just flown the month before, exact same route, and had spent $250, well, she was convinced he was a profligate spender who didn't know how to budget.

 

I've gotten this too, in going to see my mother. She lives 415 miles, give or take, door to door.while you can fly, and in the past, I was able to get some inexpensive flights, that is a thing of the past.  Itís not the money, but the time.

For me to drive, I normally leave about 6:30 am, and arrive around 2ish, depending on traffic, how many pit stops I need to make, and so on. Cost of gas; Iíd say 3 tanks total, so maybe 120 (it may be less now that I have a newer car which gets much better gas mileage). No tolls to speak of, and I also have the freedom of having my OWN car to come and go as I please.

Flying would require me to leave my house about 5:30, to arrive, park, and shuttle to the airport (I park offsite which is less). Parking for a week, say about 110 or so, airfare now, about $320. Then either rent a car, which is a lot, take the shuttle, about $50, or have my mom drive 45 minutes or so to pick me up. the flight leaves about 8:15 or so, gets in after 10, and if I shuttle or wait for a ride, donít get to her house until 1 or later.  Total cost: close to $500 vs. the $120 for gas. yet I still have people question ďisnít flying better?ĒNO!

Hillia

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #819 on: July 31, 2013, 02:37:34 PM »
My BIL was outraged to discover that about the least you can pay for a hotel room in a major city is ~$50.  You can get slightly better prices by using hotels.com or a similar site, but not much less.

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gmatoy

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #820 on: July 31, 2013, 03:12:05 PM »
Regarding  a not so much cheap skate friend: When in high school I had a group of friends and we would go to the diner near our high school and dump all of our change in the middle of the table and figure out what we had enough money to buy. It was usually a plate or two of fries to share and a soda for each person.  As we left, we would check our pockets for more money and leave it as a tip.

Years later, one of those friends looked me up and took me out to lunch, refusing to let me pay or leave a tip and his reason for that was, drumroll, please: Dave (not his real name) said that all those years ago, when we all pooled our money, I would slip him some coins to throw in. I helped him save face and he wanted to thank me for it. Well, yes, but I was the only one that knew what his family situation was.  Dave's money went to buy food as his father drank up most of his own paycheck. Having my own family issues, I wanted him to be able to be with us and it was worth it to have him there.

I tried to explain that to him and he just kept saying, "The way I kept my own dignity was to to tell myself that 'Someday I will repay her!' "

Which he did in that one meal, at a swanky place, when inflation had really made a meal expensive! So, sometimes, the bread of the waters comes back in a delightful way.

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #821 on: July 31, 2013, 03:25:51 PM »
My BIL was outraged to discover that about the least you can pay for a hotel room in a major city is ~$50.  You can get slightly better prices by using hotels.com or a similar site, but not much less.

I know people like this. They have absolutely no clue what things cost, except in THEIR mind, and are outraged when they find out its a lot more. In this day and age, all it takes is a few minutes of online research, etc. to get an accurate idea of what you might pay.

My cousin is cheap, but only when it comes to things that are not "fun" i.e. shopping for clothes, purses or shoes. or anything for herself that isn't a necessity. Its kind of funny and sad at the same time. She probably makes double what I do as well. We are going on a cruise next year. I learned, and my new strategy is, I don't pack as much as I have, but will pay $15 or so to have some of the things I bring washed on the ship. To me, I'd rather do that than schlep a much heavier bag there and back

She thinks I'm nuts, yet she thinks nothing of spending $500 on purses at the Coach outlet in 10 minutes, and I've seen her do it. THAT is a legitimate expense, but anything that makes sense is not. I sometimes have to scratch my head when she does that as it makes no sense to me. But I guess that's why I'm much more practical than she is in many ways.

ladyknight1

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #822 on: July 31, 2013, 03:31:10 PM »
Regarding  a not so much cheap skate friend: When in high school I had a group of friends and we would go to the diner near our high school and dump all of our change in the middle of the table and figure out what we had enough money to buy. It was usually a plate or two of fries to share and a soda for each person.  As we left, we would check our pockets for more money and leave it as a tip.

Years later, one of those friends looked me up and took me out to lunch, refusing to let me pay or leave a tip and his reason for that was, drumroll, please: Dave (not his real name) said that all those years ago, when we all pooled our money, I would slip him some coins to throw in. I helped him save face and he wanted to thank me for it. Well, yes, but I was the only one that knew what his family situation was.  Dave's money went to buy food as his father drank up most of his own paycheck. Having my own family issues, I wanted him to be able to be with us and it was worth it to have him there.

I tried to explain that to him and he just kept saying, "The way I kept my own dignity was to to tell myself that 'Someday I will repay her!' "
Which he did in that one meal, at a swanky place, when inflation had really made a meal expensive! So, sometimes, the bread of the waters comes back in a delightful way.

Such a nice story.
« Last Edit: July 31, 2013, 03:58:38 PM by ladyknight1 »

jedikaiti

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #823 on: July 31, 2013, 03:33:00 PM »
The next day she called and said she was doing the math in her head and it didn't add up. She figured the 100 was good enough for both, and she thought we should give back at least the other 100, but the whole 130 would be better, since they had to buy food and stuff too. I told her she was welcome to come examine the receipts, but if she did I would charge her half of what we actually spent, rather than the rough estimate we'd worked out to be done with it.

I guess she look some things up because we never heard another word about it.
Miss Tickle, I would be shocked at the audacity of your 'friends' except I'm starting to wonder if cheapskates also don't realize what things cost. My brother is not a cheapskate but he can be a little cheap. I remember him telling me that going to Disney World is not as expensive as I was making it out to be.

Now mind you, we lived a couple hours from Disney growing up and he only went with myself and our parents. I was talking about going to Disney from out-of-state, motels, gas, tickets for four persons, etc. He only remembered going with our parents footing the bill for everything. When I explained it would be $2000 for a week, he was shocked -shocked, I tell you! Those were the prices from over 10 years ago, anyway.
I think the bolded is part of it. If you're a cheapskate, you don't spend money. If you not buying stuff, you don't know what it costs or at least, what it costs NOW.  You have no idea of the relative value or when a deal is really a deal. Two examples:

1. My MIL (the worst cheapskate I ever hope to meet on this planet or any other) would never fly anywhere because it was "too expensive". At one point, she had to travel to a location and made these elaborate and time-consuming plans to avoid flying "because it's too expensive." Her BIL looked up the flight costs and it turned out that Southwest was having a promotion or some such and the roundtrip ticket was all of $59. FIFTY-NINE DOLLARS. She kept insisting that was too much money and that $59 was a very expensive airline ticket. Her BIL then pointed out what she'd be spending in gas, lodging, and food to get to her destination and while she then did acknowledge that $59 was cheaper than her plan, she still thought $59 was an OUTRAGEOUS sum to fly nearly across the country. When BIL pointed out that he'd just flown the month before, exact same route, and had spent $250, well, she was convinced he was a profligate spender who didn't know how to budget.

2. My father was convinced when we bought our house that the $99K it cost was ridiculous, that we were stupid fools for paying that much, and that our bank must be staffed by idiots to agree to a mortgage because and I quote, "No normal house is worth $99K. Sure, a mansion  maybe. But a regular house? NO regular house costs more than $25K." When my mother then showed hiim the Sunday paper listings for houses, he blustered and flustered and insisted that the listed prices were "inflated" and "any fool" could dicker ANY house down to no more than $25K. Because that is what they'd paid for their house when they'd bought it 20 years before.

Your father would burst a blood vessel if he saw home prices where I live (King County, Washington).

Same here! (Denver/Boulder area) We're having trouble finding anything decent under $200k.
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gramma dishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #824 on: July 31, 2013, 03:34:50 PM »
Regarding  a not so much cheap skate friend: When in high school I had a group of friends and we would go to the diner near our high school and dump all of our change in the middle of the table and figure out what we had enough money to buy. It was usually a plate or two of fries to share and a soda for each person.  As we left, we would check our pockets for more money and leave it as a tip.

Years later, one of those friends looked me up and took me out to lunch, refusing to let me pay or leave a tip and his reason for that was, drumroll, please: Dave (not his real name) said that all those years ago, when we all pooled our money, I would slip him some coins to throw in. I helped him save face and he wanted to thank me for it. Well, yes, but I was the only one that knew what his family situation was.  Dave's money went to buy food as his father drank up most of his own paycheck. Having my own family issues, I wanted him to be able to be with us and it was worth it to have him there.

I tried to explain that to him and he just kept saying, "The way I kept my own dignity was to to tell myself that 'Someday I will repay her!' "

Which he did in that one meal, at a swanky place, when inflation had really made a meal expensive! So, sometimes, the bread of the waters comes back in a delightful way.

That really truly is a nice story and speaks quite highly of both you and 'Dave'.  Sweet.