Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 206677 times)

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jedikaiti

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #825 on: July 31, 2013, 03:36:30 PM »
My BIL was outraged to discover that about the least you can pay for a hotel room in a major city is ~$50.  You can get slightly better prices by using hotels.com or a similar site, but not much less.

With or without clean sheets?
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lady_disdain

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #826 on: July 31, 2013, 03:52:48 PM »
My BIL was outraged to discover that about the least you can pay for a hotel room in a major city is ~$50.  You can get slightly better prices by using hotels.com or a similar site, but not much less.

With or without clean sheets?

I was recently travelling in the US (Savannah all the up to New York) and finding a half way decent motel (aka, the ones that weren't the local druggie hangout) for $50 was not easy. In general, I was looking at $70-$80. Washington DC and New York were higher than that.

jedikaiti

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #827 on: July 31, 2013, 03:55:45 PM »
My BIL was outraged to discover that about the least you can pay for a hotel room in a major city is ~$50.  You can get slightly better prices by using hotels.com or a similar site, but not much less.

With or without clean sheets?

I was recently travelling in the US (Savannah all the up to New York) and finding a half way decent motel (aka, the ones that weren't the local druggie hangout) for $50 was not easy. In general, I was looking at $70-$80. Washington DC and New York were higher than that.

I always assume at least $100/night, especially with taxes.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

gramma dishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #828 on: July 31, 2013, 04:11:56 PM »


I always assume at least $100/night, especially with taxes.

Yes, that's where they get you.  They quote a price per night per room.  That's about what you expect to pay.  Then they start adding on all the various and sundry taxes and suddenly the price you were quoted nearly doubles!   :(

blueyzca01

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #829 on: July 31, 2013, 04:22:41 PM »
The next day she called and said she was doing the math in her head and it didn't add up. She figured the 100 was good enough for both, and she thought we should give back at least the other 100, but the whole 130 would be better, since they had to buy food and stuff too. I told her she was welcome to come examine the receipts, but if she did I would charge her half of what we actually spent, rather than the rough estimate we'd worked out to be done with it.

I guess she look some things up because we never heard another word about it.
Miss Tickle, I would be shocked at the audacity of your 'friends' except I'm starting to wonder if cheapskates also don't realize what things cost. My brother is not a cheapskate but he can be a little cheap. I remember him telling me that going to Disney World is not as expensive as I was making it out to be.

Now mind you, we lived a couple hours from Disney growing up and he only went with myself and our parents. I was talking about going to Disney from out-of-state, motels, gas, tickets for four persons, etc. He only remembered going with our parents footing the bill for everything. When I explained it would be $2000 for a week, he was shocked -shocked, I tell you! Those were the prices from over 10 years ago, anyway.
I think the bolded is part of it. If you're a cheapskate, you don't spend money. If you not buying stuff, you don't know what it costs or at least, what it costs NOW.  You have no idea of the relative value or when a deal is really a deal. Two examples:

1. My MIL (the worst cheapskate I ever hope to meet on this planet or any other) would never fly anywhere because it was "too expensive". At one point, she had to travel to a location and made these elaborate and time-consuming plans to avoid flying "because it's too expensive." Her BIL looked up the flight costs and it turned out that Southwest was having a promotion or some such and the roundtrip ticket was all of $59. FIFTY-NINE DOLLARS. She kept insisting that was too much money and that $59 was a very expensive airline ticket. Her BIL then pointed out what she'd be spending in gas, lodging, and food to get to her destination and while she then did acknowledge that $59 was cheaper than her plan, she still thought $59 was an OUTRAGEOUS sum to fly nearly across the country. When BIL pointed out that he'd just flown the month before, exact same route, and had spent $250, well, she was convinced he was a profligate spender who didn't know how to budget.

2. My father was convinced when we bought our house that the $99K it cost was ridiculous, that we were stupid fools for paying that much, and that our bank must be staffed by idiots to agree to a mortgage because and I quote, "No normal house is worth $99K. Sure, a mansion  maybe. But a regular house? NO regular house costs more than $25K." When my mother then showed hiim the Sunday paper listings for houses, he blustered and flustered and insisted that the listed prices were "inflated" and "any fool" could dicker ANY house down to no more than $25K. Because that is what they'd paid for their house when they'd bought it 20 years before.

Your father would burst a blood vessel if he saw home prices where I live (King County, Washington).

Same here! (Denver/Boulder area) We're having trouble finding anything decent under $200k.

Southern CA here...LA County.  Try $550,000  3bd/2bath.  nothing fancy.  It's so sad
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StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #830 on: July 31, 2013, 04:47:34 PM »
The next day she called and said she was doing the math in her head and it didn't add up. She figured the 100 was good enough for both, and she thought we should give back at least the other 100, but the whole 130 would be better, since they had to buy food and stuff too. I told her she was welcome to come examine the receipts, but if she did I would charge her half of what we actually spent, rather than the rough estimate we'd worked out to be done with it.

I guess she look some things up because we never heard another word about it.
Miss Tickle, I would be shocked at the audacity of your 'friends' except I'm starting to wonder if cheapskates also don't realize what things cost. My brother is not a cheapskate but he can be a little cheap. I remember him telling me that going to Disney World is not as expensive as I was making it out to be.

Now mind you, we lived a couple hours from Disney growing up and he only went with myself and our parents. I was talking about going to Disney from out-of-state, motels, gas, tickets for four persons, etc. He only remembered going with our parents footing the bill for everything. When I explained it would be $2000 for a week, he was shocked -shocked, I tell you! Those were the prices from over 10 years ago, anyway.
I think the bolded is part of it. If you're a cheapskate, you don't spend money. If you not buying stuff, you don't know what it costs or at least, what it costs NOW.  You have no idea of the relative value or when a deal is really a deal. Two examples:

1. My MIL (the worst cheapskate I ever hope to meet on this planet or any other) would never fly anywhere because it was "too expensive". At one point, she had to travel to a location and made these elaborate and time-consuming plans to avoid flying "because it's too expensive." Her BIL looked up the flight costs and it turned out that Southwest was having a promotion or some such and the roundtrip ticket was all of $59. FIFTY-NINE DOLLARS. She kept insisting that was too much money and that $59 was a very expensive airline ticket. Her BIL then pointed out what she'd be spending in gas, lodging, and food to get to her destination and while she then did acknowledge that $59 was cheaper than her plan, she still thought $59 was an OUTRAGEOUS sum to fly nearly across the country. When BIL pointed out that he'd just flown the month before, exact same route, and had spent $250, well, she was convinced he was a profligate spender who didn't know how to budget.

2. My father was convinced when we bought our house that the $99K it cost was ridiculous, that we were stupid fools for paying that much, and that our bank must be staffed by idiots to agree to a mortgage because and I quote, "No normal house is worth $99K. Sure, a mansion  maybe. But a regular house? NO regular house costs more than $25K." When my mother then showed hiim the Sunday paper listings for houses, he blustered and flustered and insisted that the listed prices were "inflated" and "any fool" could dicker ANY house down to no more than $25K. Because that is what they'd paid for their house when they'd bought it 20 years before.

Your father would burst a blood vessel if he saw home prices where I live (King County, Washington).

Same here! (Denver/Boulder area) We're having trouble finding anything decent under $200k.

Southern CA here...LA County.  Try $550,000  3bd/2bath.  nothing fancy.  It's so sad

I think $99K will get you a closet in New York City, if that. 

My story is not so much cheapskate as illogical.  I have relatives who will drive miles to get the cheapest gas, but the gas is maybe only one or two cents cheaper than a much closer gas station.  I never did the calculations, but I wouldn't be surprised if they spent more money traveling to the farther gas station than to get the more expensive gas.

I also have a relative who will insist on keeping leftovers for weeks because she doesn't want to throw it out, but yet it's no longer edible or safe to eat. 

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #831 on: July 31, 2013, 05:23:05 PM »
On the travel board where I hang out, we get a lot of people who want to travel very cheaply. Fair enough, but often many don't understand that cheap is relative. People who are used to traveling in parts of Asia, where you can live on US$25 a day if you do it right, can't believe that they can't do the same in the US. "My budget is $60 per day for food, lodging and transportation."

Some can't get their heads around the fact that a cross-country plane flight is often cheaper than a train or a bus. Or that renting a campervan and camping out is not necessarily going to be cheaper than a car and cheap motels.

People want to plan overnight bus rides, to save on hotel bills. (Not uncommon in some countries.)

One guy was astonished that he couldn't find lodging in Los Angeles for $15 per night. (A bed in a hostel form runs $25-35.) Someone else wanted to rent a room in LA for a week for $150.

People want to buy a car for a trip and figure $700 would be a good price. (They are usually quite disheartened to find out that it is not easy to buy a car in the US if you don't have a US address. And even more disheartened when people laugh at the $700.)

A genuine cheapskate wanted to spend time in Hawaii, camping out and eating fruit growing on wild trees.

Some of the really shortsighted ones figure they are immortal and don't want to get recommended immunizations or buy travel health insurance.

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lady_disdain

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #832 on: July 31, 2013, 06:12:57 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

Cami

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #833 on: July 31, 2013, 06:20:57 PM »

My story is not so much cheapskate as illogical.  I have relatives who will drive miles to get the cheapest gas, but the gas is maybe only one or two cents cheaper than a much closer gas station.  I never did the calculations, but I wouldn't be surprised if they spent more money traveling to the farther gas station than to get the more expensive gas.


Ah yes, the penny wise pound foolish sort of cheapskate. I worked with a woman who worked only part-time. She worked only part-time because she was a self-professed cheapskate and spent the other 20 hours per week clipping coupons and running all over the COUNTY going to 55 different grocery stores for the "best deals". One time I challenged her to total up what she saved. Then total up her gas and car costs PLUS the amount of money she was losing by not working. Now compare. It will be no surprise that her "savings" were far outweighed by what she was losing in gas, wear and tear, and loss of income. And then consider that with the lower income she wasn't putting as much into SocSec nor was she eligible for our company's pension plan. So that "savings" for the grocery bill (and there were just 2 of them at home) was not only bad for the short-term savings, it was extremely costly for the long-term. She just refused to see the reality though. As far as I  know, she's still doing it with gas at $3.75/gallon.

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #834 on: July 31, 2013, 06:32:52 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.
Actually, most credit cards do not cover medical. It depends on the country where the card was issued. Most US-issued cards have no such provision, for example. And a credit card might not cover the several thousand dollars a serious injury might cost in the US. 

I discovered the hard way that CC rental insurance only covers what your existing insurance does not, and that the claims process was onerous.

Back to cheapskate-ism. I am always fascinated by the logic that it is "too expensive" to be immunized vs. coming down with some potentially fatal disease, in a country with very poor health care.

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Mel the Redcap

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #835 on: July 31, 2013, 07:16:59 PM »
Insurance is usually a good idea! I know people who get really angry about being asked if they want the extended warranty, etc, because "you don't get the money back if you don't use the warranty".

...Of course you don't. That's how insurance and warranties WORK. The insurance company is gambling that they'll make more money in warranty/insurance payments than they have to pay out in repairs/benefits, and you're insuring that if something expensive happens during the warranty period you'll be covered.

The Good Ethnic Boy came out on the wrong side of this calculation recently. We both have iMacs, and they both fritzed within a day of each other (for unrelated reasons). I'd paid for the extended AppleCare, and although the warranty period had actually expired a month earlier they still covered the repair (woot! Yay Apple!). The Good Ethnic Boy had bought his iMac a few months after I got mine, so it would still have been covered... if he'd gotten AppleCare. Which he hadn't. Y'see, every time he's bought a computer before now, he's gotten the extended warranty and then not needed to use it, so this one time he figured why bother? :-\
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Asharah

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #836 on: July 31, 2013, 07:20:37 PM »
Oh, the absence of reality cheapskates.

My father wants desperately to go on an Alaska cruise, but my mom thinks it is too expensive. After all, they would have to fly to a foreign country (Canada) to embark on the cruise and that is very expensive. They have passports already, and I found a cheaper way for them to fly to Seattle from their home town, then take the train to the port. Would save nearly $600 per person. The cruises are a good price as well and they can afford it. But, it is too expensive because my mom wants prices the way they were in the 1960's.

I want to tell her to live while she can, spend my inheritance and enjoy her life!
Maybe Dad should just book the trip and tell her afterwards. She can go or stay home and sulk about the money.
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lady_disdain

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #837 on: July 31, 2013, 07:38:40 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.
Actually, most credit cards do not cover medical. It depends on the country where the card was issued. Most US-issued cards have no such provision, for example. And a credit card might not cover the several thousand dollars a serious injury might cost in the US. 

I discovered the hard way that CC rental insurance only covers what your existing insurance does not, and that the claims process was onerous.

Back to cheapskate-ism. I am always fascinated by the logic that it is "too expensive" to be immunized vs. coming down with some potentially fatal disease, in a country with very poor health care.

I guess it is different by country, then. My cards (Visa and Mastercard) cover medical emergencies, ER, return to home country and a doctor to escort you. The car insurance is also pretty good, as long as you don't buy any other insurance, which immediately voids the credit card insurance.

weeblewobble

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #838 on: July 31, 2013, 08:05:56 PM »
At our hotel, we'll get people who arrive at the airport late at night, say 11:30pm, and then they come straight to our hotel and try to check in, saying "I have a reservation for today." Well, yes, you have a reservation for a room for later this evening and check in time will start at 2pm this afternoon. They'll try to argue that they reserved a room for Wednesday, and now that it's after midnight, that makes it Wednesday and we should have a room for them. Essentially, they want a room for late Tuesday/early Wednesday for free, when they only booked a room for Wednesday evening. The poor night auditor has had to put up with several guests trying to pull that trick this year. If we happen to have an empty room when they arrive, we can sometimes give it to them at half the normal rate, but sometimes we are sold out, so when they stand in the lobby at 1:00am demanding their room, there is nothing we can do for them until 2pm.

In a nutshell- booking a hotel room for one night means that you get the room from 2pm  (check in time) until 11am the next day (check out time). You get use of the room for 21 hours. These people want to get use of the room for well over 24 hours, at no extra cost.

My family and I recently visited a resort known for its family friendliness and indoor waterpark.  It is always booked solid.  It took us months of planning to get a reservation during the peak season. When we arrived, I went to the front desk to check in and the lady in the next line was arguing with the clerk that she didn't really need a reservation that EVERYBODY knew that hotels keep empty blocks of rooms "just in case" and that EVERYBODY knew that those rooms were cheaper than the rest because the hotels were desperate to fill them.  (These seem like contradictory statements, but I blame Priceline commercials because she was using almost the exact same language.)

When the clerk explained that he was sorry, the resort was full, she pitched a fit, pointing to her three kids (all under 12 and standing there loaded down with pool rafts and vacation debris, looking very embarrassed) and yelling that she'd PROMISED her kids a vacation at this resort and that they drove eight hours from their home state to get here. So... she planned enough in advance to drive eight hours to a specific resort, but didn't think to check the availability on the off-chance she'd get a discounted room? 

She immediately demanded a premium room at 25 percent of what she would have paid for a regular room and she wanted to upgrade to a host of resort fun packages for FREE just to make up for her trouble.  I finished my check in and walked away from the melee before I found out what the result was, but the expression on the clerk's face read, "Uh, no."

wolfie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #839 on: July 31, 2013, 10:04:04 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

When Hurricane Sandy devastated the east cost of the us i was halfway through a trip to Europe. On the way back I was in line to check in and started talking to the person behind me. She was supposed to fly back either the day Sandy hit or the day after but because of the hurricane the first flight back she could get was 5 days later. Trip insurance paid for the hotel, meals, and transportation - she got almost another full week of vacation for free. 

I never got trip insurance before but after talking to her I am thinking it might be worth it.