News: IMPORTANT UPDATE REGARDING SITE IN FORUM ANNOUNCEMENT FOLDER.

  • May 20, 2018, 02:35:43 PM

Login with username, password and session length

Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 624531 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Asharah

  • Member
  • Posts: 4138
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #810 on: July 31, 2013, 06:20:37 PM »
Oh, the absence of reality cheapskates.

My father wants desperately to go on an Alaska cruise, but my mom thinks it is too expensive. After all, they would have to fly to a foreign country (Canada) to embark on the cruise and that is very expensive. They have passports already, and I found a cheaper way for them to fly to Seattle from their home town, then take the train to the port. Would save nearly $600 per person. The cruises are a good price as well and they can afford it. But, it is too expensive because my mom wants prices the way they were in the 1960's.

I want to tell her to live while she can, spend my inheritance and enjoy her life!
Maybe Dad should just book the trip and tell her afterwards. She can go or stay home and sulk about the money.
Asharah

lady_disdain

  • Member
  • Posts: 5872
    • Contemporary Jewelry
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #811 on: July 31, 2013, 06:38:40 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.
Actually, most credit cards do not cover medical. It depends on the country where the card was issued. Most US-issued cards have no such provision, for example. And a credit card might not cover the several thousand dollars a serious injury might cost in the US. 

I discovered the hard way that CC rental insurance only covers what your existing insurance does not, and that the claims process was onerous.

Back to cheapskate-ism. I am always fascinated by the logic that it is "too expensive" to be immunized vs. coming down with some potentially fatal disease, in a country with very poor health care.

I guess it is different by country, then. My cards (Visa and Mastercard) cover medical emergencies, ER, return to home country and a doctor to escort you. The car insurance is also pretty good, as long as you don't buy any other insurance, which immediately voids the credit card insurance.

weeblewobble

  • Member
  • Posts: 2648
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #812 on: July 31, 2013, 07:05:56 PM »
At our hotel, we'll get people who arrive at the airport late at night, say 11:30pm, and then they come straight to our hotel and try to check in, saying "I have a reservation for today." Well, yes, you have a reservation for a room for later this evening and check in time will start at 2pm this afternoon. They'll try to argue that they reserved a room for Wednesday, and now that it's after midnight, that makes it Wednesday and we should have a room for them. Essentially, they want a room for late Tuesday/early Wednesday for free, when they only booked a room for Wednesday evening. The poor night auditor has had to put up with several guests trying to pull that trick this year. If we happen to have an empty room when they arrive, we can sometimes give it to them at half the normal rate, but sometimes we are sold out, so when they stand in the lobby at 1:00am demanding their room, there is nothing we can do for them until 2pm.

In a nutshell- booking a hotel room for one night means that you get the room from 2pm  (check in time) until 11am the next day (check out time). You get use of the room for 21 hours. These people want to get use of the room for well over 24 hours, at no extra cost.

My family and I recently visited a resort known for its family friendliness and indoor waterpark.  It is always booked solid.  It took us months of planning to get a reservation during the peak season. When we arrived, I went to the front desk to check in and the lady in the next line was arguing with the clerk that she didn't really need a reservation that EVERYBODY knew that hotels keep empty blocks of rooms "just in case" and that EVERYBODY knew that those rooms were cheaper than the rest because the hotels were desperate to fill them.  (These seem like contradictory statements, but I blame Priceline commercials because she was using almost the exact same language.)

When the clerk explained that he was sorry, the resort was full, she pitched a fit, pointing to her three kids (all under 12 and standing there loaded down with pool rafts and vacation debris, looking very embarrassed) and yelling that she'd PROMISED her kids a vacation at this resort and that they drove eight hours from their home state to get here. So... she planned enough in advance to drive eight hours to a specific resort, but didn't think to check the availability on the off-chance she'd get a discounted room? 

She immediately demanded a premium room at 25 percent of what she would have paid for a regular room and she wanted to upgrade to a host of resort fun packages for FREE just to make up for her trouble.  I finished my check in and walked away from the melee before I found out what the result was, but the expression on the clerk's face read, "Uh, no."

wolfie

  • I don't know what this is so I am putting random words here
  • Member
  • Posts: 6935
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #813 on: July 31, 2013, 09:04:04 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

When Hurricane Sandy devastated the east cost of the us i was halfway through a trip to Europe. On the way back I was in line to check in and started talking to the person behind me. She was supposed to fly back either the day Sandy hit or the day after but because of the hurricane the first flight back she could get was 5 days later. Trip insurance paid for the hotel, meals, and transportation - she got almost another full week of vacation for free. 

I never got trip insurance before but after talking to her I am thinking it might be worth it.

mbbored

  • Member
  • Posts: 4882
    • Budget Grad Student
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #814 on: July 31, 2013, 09:19:02 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

When Hurricane Sandy devastated the east cost of the us i was halfway through a trip to Europe. On the way back I was in line to check in and started talking to the person behind me. She was supposed to fly back either the day Sandy hit or the day after but because of the hurricane the first flight back she could get was 5 days later. Trip insurance paid for the hotel, meals, and transportation - she got almost another full week of vacation for free. 

I never got trip insurance before but after talking to her I am thinking it might be worth it.

My grandmother broke her hip traveling in Europe. Her travel insurance paid for: her surgery and rehabilitation, my aunt's ticket out and back, my aunt's hotel room for two weeks, my grandmother's ticket back upgraded to first class (for more space), a private nurse to fly first class next to her, and a limo (also more spacious) for the two hour drive back to my grandmother's home.

StarFaerie

  • Member
  • Posts: 951
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #815 on: July 31, 2013, 10:57:35 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

When Hurricane Sandy devastated the east cost of the us i was halfway through a trip to Europe. On the way back I was in line to check in and started talking to the person behind me. She was supposed to fly back either the day Sandy hit or the day after but because of the hurricane the first flight back she could get was 5 days later. Trip insurance paid for the hotel, meals, and transportation - she got almost another full week of vacation for free. 

I never got trip insurance before but after talking to her I am thinking it might be worth it.

My grandmother broke her hip traveling in Europe. Her travel insurance paid for: her surgery and rehabilitation, my aunt's ticket out and back, my aunt's hotel room for two weeks, my grandmother's ticket back upgraded to first class (for more space), a private nurse to fly first class next to her, and a limo (also more spacious) for the two hour drive back to my grandmother's home.

This is why I get travel insurance whenever I travel o/s
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/the-most-costly-travel-insurance-claims/story-e6frfq80-1226549460166

You never know when something will go wrong and it's a relatively cheap insurance..

magician5

  • Member
  • Posts: 3149
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #816 on: July 31, 2013, 11:01:50 PM »
Insurance is usually a good idea! I know people who get really angry about being asked if they want the extended warranty, etc, because "you don't get the money back if you don't use the warranty".

...Of course you don't. That's how insurance and warranties WORK. The insurance company is gambling that they'll make more money in warranty/insurance payments than they have to pay out in repairs/benefits, and you're insuring that if something expensive happens during the warranty period you'll be covered.

Someone (George Carlin, maybe?) once said that life insurance is a gamble ... the company is betting that you won't die, and if you die then you win!
There is no 'way to peace.' Peace is the way.

Julian

  • I lost it between Thriller and Gangnam Style...
  • Member
  • Posts: 1104
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #817 on: July 31, 2013, 11:22:47 PM »

This is why I get travel insurance whenever I travel o/s
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/the-most-costly-travel-insurance-claims/story-e6frfq80-1226549460166

You never know when something will go wrong and it's a relatively cheap insurance..

Ouch!

I thought it was bad enough when Housemate contracted the flu while we were in the USA.  Doctor visit, chest X-ray and medications (Tamiflu) totalled around $400.  The insurance paid all but $100 of the total.  I had a minor dose of the same bug, but wasn't sick enough to bother with seeing anyone.

We both took out insurance because you really do never know what's going to happen.  We've both got some health issues, so it is only prudent to do so.

Out on the patio we'd sit,
And the humidity we'd breathe,
We'd watch the lightning crack over canefields
Laugh and think, this is Australia.

Ganggajang - Sounds Of Then (This Is Australia)

mbbored

  • Member
  • Posts: 4882
    • Budget Grad Student
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #818 on: August 01, 2013, 12:12:40 AM »

This is why I get travel insurance whenever I travel o/s
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/the-most-costly-travel-insurance-claims/story-e6frfq80-1226549460166

You never know when something will go wrong and it's a relatively cheap insurance..

Ouch!

I thought it was bad enough when Housemate contracted the flu while we were in the USA.  Doctor visit, chest X-ray and medications (Tamiflu) totalled around $400.  The insurance paid all but $100 of the total.  I had a minor dose of the same bug, but wasn't sick enough to bother with seeing anyone.

We both took out insurance because you really do never know what's going to happen.  We've both got some health issues, so it is only prudent to do so.

My grandmother's was more dramatic (and probably more expensive) but I had the equivalent of $10,000 worth of bills from an emergency surgery in Spain covered by travel insurance while studying abroad. The policy cost me $50.

I figured they gamble on most people being healthy and incident free. By George Carlin's view, I won! Granted, emergency surgery in a foreign country is not exactly my idea of winning, but you never know.

Bluenomi

  • Member
  • Posts: 3439
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #819 on: August 01, 2013, 12:43:16 AM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

When Hurricane Sandy devastated the east cost of the us i was halfway through a trip to Europe. On the way back I was in line to check in and started talking to the person behind me. She was supposed to fly back either the day Sandy hit or the day after but because of the hurricane the first flight back she could get was 5 days later. Trip insurance paid for the hotel, meals, and transportation - she got almost another full week of vacation for free. 

I never got trip insurance before but after talking to her I am thinking it might be worth it.

My grandmother broke her hip traveling in Europe. Her travel insurance paid for: her surgery and rehabilitation, my aunt's ticket out and back, my aunt's hotel room for two weeks, my grandmother's ticket back upgraded to first class (for more space), a private nurse to fly first class next to her, and a limo (also more spacious) for the two hour drive back to my grandmother's home.

This is why I get travel insurance whenever I travel o/s
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/the-most-costly-travel-insurance-claims/story-e6frfq80-1226549460166

You never know when something will go wrong and it's a relatively cheap insurance..

A friend of mine's husband had a heart attack at the beach in Fiji. Her insurance paid for a medical crew to fly out of Darwin to Fiji (who unfortuantly didn't make it in time to save him) and all the costs of getting the family back to Australia as well as the massive phone bill she racked up getting everything sorted. Horrid thing to go through but they really did their best to make everything go as smoothly as possible.

Twik

  • Member
  • Posts: 29056
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #820 on: August 01, 2013, 09:46:22 AM »
I had a medical thing happen to me while travelling in the US (I'm Canadian). I was in a *lot* of pain, and I really should have gone to the ER, because I didn't know what exactly was wrong with me. But I wasn't sure if my work insurance would cover me, so I stuck it out in my hotel room.

Oh, and I wasn't sure how they'd react to a Canadian showing up in ER screaming "I'm in PAIN! GIVE ME DRUGS!"
"The sky's the limit. Your sky. Your limit. Now, let's dance!"

Outdoor Girl

  • Member
  • Posts: 16767
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #821 on: August 01, 2013, 09:53:57 AM »
The last time I went to visit friends in California, I didn't bother with medical insurance.  I was helping my friend with some gardening and fell, hitting my head.  Based on my symptoms, I'm positive I had a concussion (I've had a couple before) but I decided not to go to an ER because I didn't want it to cost me thousands of dollars.

I won't make that mistake again.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
Ontario

CakeBeret

  • Member
  • Posts: 4271
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #822 on: August 01, 2013, 10:40:40 AM »
2. My father was convinced when we bought our house that the $99K it cost was ridiculous, that we were stupid fools for paying that much, and that our bank must be staffed by idiots to agree to a mortgage because and I quote, "No normal house is worth $99K. Sure, a mansion  maybe. But a regular house? NO regular house costs more than $25K." When my mother then showed hiim the Sunday paper listings for houses, he blustered and flustered and insisted that the listed prices were "inflated" and "any fool" could dicker ANY house down to no more than $25K. Because that is what they'd paid for their house when they'd bought it 20 years before.

Sounds much like my grandfather-in-law.

He bought a 650sqft house on an acre for $7000 about 45 years ago. This is his entire basis for his opinion on home prices.

When we bought our first house, home prices in the area looked like this:

$25-40k for a house that requires significant rehab (I'm talking months of work and $20k+ to rehab)
$50-80k for an older house that needed some work
$80-130k for a house in decent shape, possibly older and/or ugly, but usually move-in ready
$130-200k for a nice, new, move-in-ready house

Our house was only 5 years old, budget-built (no walk-in closets, only about 900sqft) but had the garage of my dreams and a nice kitchen, a big yard, basically everything that was important to us. It was also move-in ready; we both work full time and had neither the time nor the skills for renovation projects. Our house cost $101k and we were perfectly happy with that figure.

We refused to talk about how much we paid, but somehow GFIL got wind of the purchase price. He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."
"From a procrastination standpoint, today has been wildly successful."

CakeBeret

  • Member
  • Posts: 4271
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #823 on: August 01, 2013, 10:41:36 AM »
Regarding  a not so much cheap skate friend: When in high school I had a group of friends and we would go to the diner near our high school and dump all of our change in the middle of the table and figure out what we had enough money to buy. It was usually a plate or two of fries to share and a soda for each person.  As we left, we would check our pockets for more money and leave it as a tip.

Years later, one of those friends looked me up and took me out to lunch, refusing to let me pay or leave a tip and his reason for that was, drumroll, please: Dave (not his real name) said that all those years ago, when we all pooled our money, I would slip him some coins to throw in. I helped him save face and he wanted to thank me for it. Well, yes, but I was the only one that knew what his family situation was.  Dave's money went to buy food as his father drank up most of his own paycheck. Having my own family issues, I wanted him to be able to be with us and it was worth it to have him there.

I tried to explain that to him and he just kept saying, "The way I kept my own dignity was to to tell myself that 'Someday I will repay her!' "

Which he did in that one meal, at a swanky place, when inflation had really made a meal expensive! So, sometimes, the bread of the waters comes back in a delightful way.

This story made me tear up a little. Dave sounds like a wonderful guy and you sound like a great friend. :)
"From a procrastination standpoint, today has been wildly successful."

nutraxfornerves

  • Member
  • Posts: 1785
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #824 on: August 01, 2013, 10:52:55 AM »
Another travel cheapskate-ism I've seen that doesn't work (I'm talking about people who deliberately plan to do this, not people who have bad luck):

I'll buy a one-way ticket to X. I'll stay until my money runs out, then my embassy will have to fly me home, so I can avoid paying for a round trip ticket.

That's when they find out that the embassy won't do that. Depending on the country,the embassy may say "tough luck," or may offer to help you contact friends or family who can send you money. The US, in the worst case, will loan you the money for a plane ticket, then confiscate your passport and bill you for the cost. You won't get the passport back until you pay up.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data