Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 221634 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

mbbored

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5315
    • Budget Grad Student
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #840 on: July 31, 2013, 10:19:02 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

When Hurricane Sandy devastated the east cost of the us i was halfway through a trip to Europe. On the way back I was in line to check in and started talking to the person behind me. She was supposed to fly back either the day Sandy hit or the day after but because of the hurricane the first flight back she could get was 5 days later. Trip insurance paid for the hotel, meals, and transportation - she got almost another full week of vacation for free. 

I never got trip insurance before but after talking to her I am thinking it might be worth it.

My grandmother broke her hip traveling in Europe. Her travel insurance paid for: her surgery and rehabilitation, my aunt's ticket out and back, my aunt's hotel room for two weeks, my grandmother's ticket back upgraded to first class (for more space), a private nurse to fly first class next to her, and a limo (also more spacious) for the two hour drive back to my grandmother's home.

StarFaerie

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1186
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #841 on: July 31, 2013, 11:57:35 PM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

When Hurricane Sandy devastated the east cost of the us i was halfway through a trip to Europe. On the way back I was in line to check in and started talking to the person behind me. She was supposed to fly back either the day Sandy hit or the day after but because of the hurricane the first flight back she could get was 5 days later. Trip insurance paid for the hotel, meals, and transportation - she got almost another full week of vacation for free. 

I never got trip insurance before but after talking to her I am thinking it might be worth it.

My grandmother broke her hip traveling in Europe. Her travel insurance paid for: her surgery and rehabilitation, my aunt's ticket out and back, my aunt's hotel room for two weeks, my grandmother's ticket back upgraded to first class (for more space), a private nurse to fly first class next to her, and a limo (also more spacious) for the two hour drive back to my grandmother's home.

This is why I get travel insurance whenever I travel o/s
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/the-most-costly-travel-insurance-claims/story-e6frfq80-1226549460166

You never know when something will go wrong and it's a relatively cheap insurance..

magician5

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3490
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #842 on: August 01, 2013, 12:01:50 AM »
Insurance is usually a good idea! I know people who get really angry about being asked if they want the extended warranty, etc, because "you don't get the money back if you don't use the warranty".

...Of course you don't. That's how insurance and warranties WORK. The insurance company is gambling that they'll make more money in warranty/insurance payments than they have to pay out in repairs/benefits, and you're insuring that if something expensive happens during the warranty period you'll be covered.

Someone (George Carlin, maybe?) once said that life insurance is a gamble ... the company is betting that you won't die, and if you die then you win!
There is no 'way to peace.' Peace is the way.

Julian

  • I lost it between Thriller and Gangnam Style...
  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 813
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #843 on: August 01, 2013, 12:22:47 AM »

This is why I get travel insurance whenever I travel o/s
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/the-most-costly-travel-insurance-claims/story-e6frfq80-1226549460166

You never know when something will go wrong and it's a relatively cheap insurance..

Ouch!

I thought it was bad enough when Housemate contracted the flu while we were in the USA.  Doctor visit, chest X-ray and medications (Tamiflu) totalled around $400.  The insurance paid all but $100 of the total.  I had a minor dose of the same bug, but wasn't sick enough to bother with seeing anyone.

We both took out insurance because you really do never know what's going to happen.  We've both got some health issues, so it is only prudent to do so.

mbbored

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 5315
    • Budget Grad Student
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #844 on: August 01, 2013, 01:12:40 AM »

This is why I get travel insurance whenever I travel o/s
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/the-most-costly-travel-insurance-claims/story-e6frfq80-1226549460166

You never know when something will go wrong and it's a relatively cheap insurance..

Ouch!

I thought it was bad enough when Housemate contracted the flu while we were in the USA.  Doctor visit, chest X-ray and medications (Tamiflu) totalled around $400.  The insurance paid all but $100 of the total.  I had a minor dose of the same bug, but wasn't sick enough to bother with seeing anyone.

We both took out insurance because you really do never know what's going to happen.  We've both got some health issues, so it is only prudent to do so.

My grandmother's was more dramatic (and probably more expensive) but I had the equivalent of $10,000 worth of bills from an emergency surgery in Spain covered by travel insurance while studying abroad. The policy cost me $50.

I figured they gamble on most people being healthy and incident free. By George Carlin's view, I won! Granted, emergency surgery in a foreign country is not exactly my idea of winning, but you never know.

Bluenomi

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3580
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #845 on: August 01, 2013, 01:43:16 AM »
[...] or buy travel health insurance. [...]

On a tangent, I never buy travel health insurance, as my credit card covers medical emergencies. Most international credit cards do when you charge the plane ticket but many people don't know this. Most credit cards also have rental car insurance (if you pay with it) so I also never get insurance when renting. Of course, check the rules on your credit cards and see if their insurance meets your needs.

Just my cheapskate advice for the day.

When Hurricane Sandy devastated the east cost of the us i was halfway through a trip to Europe. On the way back I was in line to check in and started talking to the person behind me. She was supposed to fly back either the day Sandy hit or the day after but because of the hurricane the first flight back she could get was 5 days later. Trip insurance paid for the hotel, meals, and transportation - she got almost another full week of vacation for free. 

I never got trip insurance before but after talking to her I am thinking it might be worth it.

My grandmother broke her hip traveling in Europe. Her travel insurance paid for: her surgery and rehabilitation, my aunt's ticket out and back, my aunt's hotel room for two weeks, my grandmother's ticket back upgraded to first class (for more space), a private nurse to fly first class next to her, and a limo (also more spacious) for the two hour drive back to my grandmother's home.

This is why I get travel insurance whenever I travel o/s
http://www.news.com.au/travel/news/the-most-costly-travel-insurance-claims/story-e6frfq80-1226549460166

You never know when something will go wrong and it's a relatively cheap insurance..

A friend of mine's husband had a heart attack at the beach in Fiji. Her insurance paid for a medical crew to fly out of Darwin to Fiji (who unfortuantly didn't make it in time to save him) and all the costs of getting the family back to Australia as well as the massive phone bill she racked up getting everything sorted. Horrid thing to go through but they really did their best to make everything go as smoothly as possible.

Twik

  • A Pillar of the Forum
  • *****
  • Posts: 28735
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #846 on: August 01, 2013, 10:46:22 AM »
I had a medical thing happen to me while travelling in the US (I'm Canadian). I was in a *lot* of pain, and I really should have gone to the ER, because I didn't know what exactly was wrong with me. But I wasn't sure if my work insurance would cover me, so I stuck it out in my hotel room.

Oh, and I wasn't sure how they'd react to a Canadian showing up in ER screaming "I'm in PAIN! GIVE ME DRUGS!"
My cousin's memoir of love and loneliness while raising a child with multiple disabilities will be out on Amazon soon! Know the Night, by Maria Mutch, has been called "full of hope, light, and companionship for surviving the small hours of the night."

Outdoor Girl

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 14241
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #847 on: August 01, 2013, 10:53:57 AM »
The last time I went to visit friends in California, I didn't bother with medical insurance.  I was helping my friend with some gardening and fell, hitting my head.  Based on my symptoms, I'm positive I had a concussion (I've had a couple before) but I decided not to go to an ER because I didn't want it to cost me thousands of dollars.

I won't make that mistake again.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

CakeBeret

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4264
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #848 on: August 01, 2013, 11:40:40 AM »
2. My father was convinced when we bought our house that the $99K it cost was ridiculous, that we were stupid fools for paying that much, and that our bank must be staffed by idiots to agree to a mortgage because and I quote, "No normal house is worth $99K. Sure, a mansion  maybe. But a regular house? NO regular house costs more than $25K." When my mother then showed hiim the Sunday paper listings for houses, he blustered and flustered and insisted that the listed prices were "inflated" and "any fool" could dicker ANY house down to no more than $25K. Because that is what they'd paid for their house when they'd bought it 20 years before.

Sounds much like my grandfather-in-law.

He bought a 650sqft house on an acre for $7000 about 45 years ago. This is his entire basis for his opinion on home prices.

When we bought our first house, home prices in the area looked like this:

$25-40k for a house that requires significant rehab (I'm talking months of work and $20k+ to rehab)
$50-80k for an older house that needed some work
$80-130k for a house in decent shape, possibly older and/or ugly, but usually move-in ready
$130-200k for a nice, new, move-in-ready house

Our house was only 5 years old, budget-built (no walk-in closets, only about 900sqft) but had the garage of my dreams and a nice kitchen, a big yard, basically everything that was important to us. It was also move-in ready; we both work full time and had neither the time nor the skills for renovation projects. Our house cost $101k and we were perfectly happy with that figure.

We refused to talk about how much we paid, but somehow GFIL got wind of the purchase price. He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."
"From a procrastination standpoint, today has been wildly successful."

CakeBeret

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4264
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #849 on: August 01, 2013, 11:41:36 AM »
Regarding  a not so much cheap skate friend: When in high school I had a group of friends and we would go to the diner near our high school and dump all of our change in the middle of the table and figure out what we had enough money to buy. It was usually a plate or two of fries to share and a soda for each person.  As we left, we would check our pockets for more money and leave it as a tip.

Years later, one of those friends looked me up and took me out to lunch, refusing to let me pay or leave a tip and his reason for that was, drumroll, please: Dave (not his real name) said that all those years ago, when we all pooled our money, I would slip him some coins to throw in. I helped him save face and he wanted to thank me for it. Well, yes, but I was the only one that knew what his family situation was.  Dave's money went to buy food as his father drank up most of his own paycheck. Having my own family issues, I wanted him to be able to be with us and it was worth it to have him there.

I tried to explain that to him and he just kept saying, "The way I kept my own dignity was to to tell myself that 'Someday I will repay her!' "

Which he did in that one meal, at a swanky place, when inflation had really made a meal expensive! So, sometimes, the bread of the waters comes back in a delightful way.

This story made me tear up a little. Dave sounds like a wonderful guy and you sound like a great friend. :)
"From a procrastination standpoint, today has been wildly successful."

nutraxfornerves

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2027
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #850 on: August 01, 2013, 11:52:55 AM »
Another travel cheapskate-ism I've seen that doesn't work (I'm talking about people who deliberately plan to do this, not people who have bad luck):

I'll buy a one-way ticket to X. I'll stay until my money runs out, then my embassy will have to fly me home, so I can avoid paying for a round trip ticket.

That's when they find out that the embassy won't do that. Depending on the country,the embassy may say "tough luck," or may offer to help you contact friends or family who can send you money. The US, in the worst case, will loan you the money for a plane ticket, then confiscate your passport and bill you for the cost. You won't get the passport back until you pay up.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

wolfie

  • I don't know what this is so I am putting random words here
  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7284
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #851 on: August 01, 2013, 12:17:15 PM »
Another travel cheapskate-ism I've seen that doesn't work (I'm talking about people who deliberately plan to do this, not people who have bad luck):

I'll buy a one-way ticket to X. I'll stay until my money runs out, then my embassy will have to fly me home, so I can avoid paying for a round trip ticket.

That's when they find out that the embassy won't do that. Depending on the country,the embassy may say "tough luck," or may offer to help you contact friends or family who can send you money. The US, in the worst case, will loan you the money for a plane ticket, then confiscate your passport and bill you for the cost. You won't get the passport back until you pay up.

That is weird because many times a round trip is cheaper then a 1 way! I remember when I went to Canada with the intent to drive back to the US. It ended up being cheaper by a few hundred to get the round trip and then dump the return ticket then do a one way! Maybe times have changed...

gramma dishes

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8265
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #852 on: August 01, 2013, 12:27:00 PM »
...    He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."

I wonder if he'll still feel that way when the time comes that he wants/needs to sell his house!   ;D

rose red

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 7826
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #853 on: August 01, 2013, 12:37:53 PM »
...    He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."

I wonder if he'll still feel that way when the time comes that he wants/needs to sell his house!   ;D

I was just about to say the same thing!  Please give me his name and I'll make him a fair, er...excellent, yeah, excellent's the word I'm looking for, offer ;).

siamesecat2965

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8876
Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #854 on: August 01, 2013, 12:47:49 PM »
...    He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."

I wonder if he'll still feel that way when the time comes that he wants/needs to sell his house!   ;D

Hahaha - like my parents when they sold their house in NJ. They, however, were not cheapskates, and as they had already found their new house, made an offer etc. they were not going to hold out for top dollar. Of course, they sold in 2005, when the market was still good.

Bought in 1975 for 65K, sold in 2005 for 765K (totally not worth that, but due to location, location, location, and the market they did WELL). House was listed but not available for viewing for a week. Sat house hit the viewing market, open house Sunday, Monday 2 offers and a contract.

They most certainly could have held out for more, but figured we have an offer, itís more than fair and we are making a huge profit (house had been paid off several years before)