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Author Topic: Cheapskate stories  (Read 624435 times)

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wolfie

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #825 on: August 01, 2013, 11:17:15 AM »
Another travel cheapskate-ism I've seen that doesn't work (I'm talking about people who deliberately plan to do this, not people who have bad luck):

I'll buy a one-way ticket to X. I'll stay until my money runs out, then my embassy will have to fly me home, so I can avoid paying for a round trip ticket.

That's when they find out that the embassy won't do that. Depending on the country,the embassy may say "tough luck," or may offer to help you contact friends or family who can send you money. The US, in the worst case, will loan you the money for a plane ticket, then confiscate your passport and bill you for the cost. You won't get the passport back until you pay up.

That is weird because many times a round trip is cheaper then a 1 way! I remember when I went to Canada with the intent to drive back to the US. It ended up being cheaper by a few hundred to get the round trip and then dump the return ticket then do a one way! Maybe times have changed...

gramma dishes

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #826 on: August 01, 2013, 11:27:00 AM »
...    He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."

I wonder if he'll still feel that way when the time comes that he wants/needs to sell his house!   ;D

rose red

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #827 on: August 01, 2013, 11:37:53 AM »
...    He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."

I wonder if he'll still feel that way when the time comes that he wants/needs to sell his house!   ;D

I was just about to say the same thing!  Please give me his name and I'll make him a fair, er...excellent, yeah, excellent's the word I'm looking for, offer ;).

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #828 on: August 01, 2013, 11:47:49 AM »
...    He came to our open house and spent the ENTIRE TIME muttering under his breath about "can't believe anyone would pay 100k, my entire house only cost $7000, ridiculous amount of money, can't believe it, absurd amount of money, blah blah blah..."

I wonder if he'll still feel that way when the time comes that he wants/needs to sell his house!   ;D

Hahaha - like my parents when they sold their house in NJ. They, however, were not cheapskates, and as they had already found their new house, made an offer etc. they were not going to hold out for top dollar. Of course, they sold in 2005, when the market was still good.

Bought in 1975 for 65K, sold in 2005 for 765K (totally not worth that, but due to location, location, location, and the market they did WELL). House was listed but not available for viewing for a week. Sat house hit the viewing market, open house Sunday, Monday 2 offers and a contract.

They most certainly could have held out for more, but figured we have an offer, its more than fair and we are making a huge profit (house had been paid off several years before)

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #829 on: August 01, 2013, 11:54:13 AM »
My story is not so much cheapskate as illogical.  I have relatives who will drive miles to get the cheapest gas, but the gas is maybe only one or two cents cheaper than a much closer gas station.  I never did the calculations, but I wouldn't be surprised if they spent more money traveling to the farther gas station than to get the more expensive gas.

 
I've actually done the calculations. My car, and my last one, both had 18.5 gallon tanks. I generally try and fill up weekly, to stay on budget, so figure 8-9 gallons. if you save .3 per gallon by driving out of your way, that's a whopping total of .27 PER WEEK, and just over $14 a YEAR. Yeah, my time is too valuable to be traipsing all over eternity and back to save that little.

I will say for me sometimes, its a mental thing. I won't go too far out of my way, but will wait, if gas is .10 more a gallon. still not a huge savings, but its the idea of it, for me.

Thankfully last summer they added gas at my local Costco, which is right by where I go weekly to grocery and other shop, so I just swing by, and fill up. And if I'm not up that way, and need gas, I just go wherever its convenient.

ica171

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #830 on: August 01, 2013, 12:03:09 PM »
snip

People want to buy a car for a trip and figure $700 would be a good price. (They are usually quite disheartened to find out that it is not easy to buy a car in the US if you don't have a US address. And even more disheartened when people laugh at the $700.)

snip

Yeah, I would think having to get insurance would make that plan not very feasible. However, from what Top Gear has taught me, and what I've heard from friends who've gone traveling in England (not sure about the U.K. as a whole), that is an option and it can be cheaper than renting a car. A friend went to visit relatives in England and buying a car was something like half the price of renting. So she bought a cheap car and gave it to her niece before they left. I think her price was $700 or less, too, and it was a nice car.

The stories about people being cheap because they think the prices are too high reminds me of me. I wear lots of T-shirts because they're cheap, cheaper than nice shirts. I have money in the monthly budget that's supposed to go toward my clothes but I never spend it. When I do go clothes shopping I usually come home with nothing. $10 for a plain T-shirt? $40 for jeans? No thanks. I saw a pair of shorts online for $50 the other day, and I can't even fathom shopping at a place like Anthropologie, where a shirt can be close to $100.

I'm only 30, but I remember when you could buy a decent house for less than $50k. I definitely get nostalgic when I look at prices these days. We just had a guy out to look at our foundation and he had recently been on vacation to California. He was talking about house prices with a friend who lived there and said our modest 4-bed 1.5-bath 1300 square foot house would go for upwards of $700k there. It's on the market now for $115k.

HenrysMom

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #831 on: August 01, 2013, 12:11:16 PM »
Re the above house stories, my parents paid $10,500 for their 900 sq. ft. house in 1952, it sold for $444K in 2005.  That's living in the Bay Area for you.

It puts me in mind of the time DH was the youngest member of a pastor search committee back in the 90's.  The other members had either paid off their homes or had much smaller mortgage payments.  When it came time to determine the new pastor's housing allowance, all the other members wanted to give him about $250/month (in the SF Bay Area - really?!?).  DH was incredulous and asked them, "Do you realize how much homes costs nowadays?"  They wouldn't budge even when DH brought our mortgage payment book ($1300/month) and a copy of a real estate magazine to a meeting as proof.  Finally the association and the seminary contacts had to tell them the facts of life.

StuffedGrapeLeaves

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #832 on: August 01, 2013, 12:15:01 PM »
Re the above house stories, my parents paid $10,500 for their 900 sq. ft. house in 1952, it sold for $444K in 2005.  That's living in the Bay Area for you.

It puts me in mind of the time DH was the youngest member of a pastor search committee back in the 90's.  The other members had either paid off their homes or had much smaller mortgage payments.  When it came time to determine the new pastor's housing allowance, all the other members wanted to give him about $250/month (in the SF Bay Area - really?!?).  DH was incredulous and asked them, "Do you realize how much homes costs nowadays?"  They wouldn't budge even when DH brought our mortgage payment book ($1300/month) and a copy of a real estate magazine to a meeting as proof.  Finally the association and the seminary contacts had to tell them the facts of life.

$250/month for the SF/Bay Area????  You can't even get a closet for that.

HenrysMom

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #833 on: August 01, 2013, 12:25:23 PM »
Re the above house stories, my parents paid $10,500 for their 900 sq. ft. house in 1952, it sold for $444K in 2005.  That's living in the Bay Area for you.

It puts me in mind of the time DH was the youngest member of a pastor search committee back in the 90's.  The other members had either paid off their homes or had much smaller mortgage payments.  When it came time to determine the new pastor's housing allowance, all the other members wanted to give him about $250/month (in the SF Bay Area - really?!?).  DH was incredulous and asked them, "Do you realize how much homes costs nowadays?"  They wouldn't budge even when DH brought our mortgage payment book ($1300/month) and a copy of a real estate magazine to a meeting as proof.  Finally the association and the seminary contacts had to tell them the facts of life.

$250/month for the SF/Bay Area????  You can't even get a closet for that.

Yup.  The chairwoman of the committee was paying $250/month on the mortgage for the house she purchased in 1968.  So she thought that was a reasonable amount, never mind that little thing called "inflation" over 20+ years.  The rest were retired people around my parents' age who paid off their houses years ago.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #834 on: August 01, 2013, 12:48:16 PM »
Friends of mine moved to California in 1999.  They didn't think they would be there that long so decided to rent, rather than buy.  And then kicked themselves.  They could have bought a nice 3-4 bedroom place in their area for $250,000ish at that time.  When they finally started looking a couple of years ago, the same thing was $650,000ish.

I'm in a bedroom community of a large city.  We aren't a suburb but a lot of people do the hour commute, either driving or by train.  So homes aren't cheap.  My 2+1 bedroom bungalow was $165,000 when I bought in 2004.  Now?  It is appraised at $240,000.  But when I add up the amount of money I've spend on upgrades - and I'm not done yet - it is pretty close to the $75,000 increase in value.  I know routine maintenance stuff doesn't really count as upgrades but still, that's a lot of money I've put into the place and I haven't even done the kitchen yet.

Stuff that has been done:  installed new front steps, with some retaining wall; replaced all the windows and doors; redid the bathroom and the powder room; new flooring in the basement; new interlock stone driveway with additional retaining wall and pathway work; new siding, roof, deck; spray foam insulated the garage to provide barrier to the rest of the house; a lot of minor repair stuff; landscaping, which I'm doing all myself.  Stuff that still needs to be done:  new furnace, air conditioner and hot water tank; new kitchen; upgrade electrical to handle additional kitchen outlets; redo the main floor flooring; repair ceiling where it is coming apart between drywall sheets; paint the whole inside; finish the landscaping (I'm on year 3 of a 5 year plan).  And stuff I'd like to do eventually:  put in a gas fireplace somewhere as an emergency heat source.  I know the fan won't run without electricity but I've been told it will still put out a bit of heat if you are in the direct vicinity.  I was thinking about putting it in the master bedroom with a full set of closets/shelves/drawers built in around it.  I'd like to install a Murphy bed in my small spare bedroom so I have more room for guests but can keep the room clear for my craft and computer stuff.  The rest of the stuff I want to do is just replacing furniture and appliances.  Could I win the lottery soon, please?   :D
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #835 on: August 01, 2013, 01:11:23 PM »
I see that a lot with "suggested" household budgets. For example, $100 in groceries should feed a family of four for a week. I'm not sure where these people are, ages and other particulars, but we (DH, DS & I) spend $150 - 200 per week on food. We don't eat expensive cuts of meat or all organic, or all name brands either.

I could feed us on that for a week, by taking shortcuts, substituting more grains instead of vegetables, but I think that is an unrealistic number to throw around and nearly every budget book I have seen uses $100 per week for four people.

I agree, I spend between $130-150 a week for a family of five and with the way my older 2 can put food away I usually end up having to go to the store halfway through the week to get more snacks.  And that's with watching sales and clipping coupons when I can find them for things I'll buy. And we don't get expensive stuff either.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

siamesecat2965

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #836 on: August 01, 2013, 01:20:53 PM »
The stories about people being cheap because they think the prices are too high reminds me of me. I wear lots of T-shirts because they're cheap, cheaper than nice shirts. I have money in the monthly budget that's supposed to go toward my clothes but I never spend it. When I do go clothes shopping I usually come home with nothing. $10 for a plain T-shirt? $40 for jeans? No thanks. I saw a pair of shorts online for $50 the other day, and I can't even fathom shopping at a place like Anthropologie, where a shirt can be close to $100.

 

I don't consider this to be cheap, but frugal. You aren't inconveniencing anyone or making anyone go without, or impacting anyone else because certain items cost more than you choose to pay for them. And unless you constantly badmouth people who are willing to pay that much for things, then you're fine.

Im cheap about certain things as well; while I work in a store where a t-shirt can be $30 or more, pants over $100, and so on.  I get a nice discount, even on the sale stuff. And when I didnt work there, I waited for sales as well. Certain things, yes, I will pay more for since Im a firm believer in you get what you pay for regarding some things.  But others, nope, I go as cheap as I can.

My friend's DH however, I posted about him upthread. he wont get a haircut unless he has a coupon, and its only $10 to begin with. She also told me he wears his undies until they are literally falling apart, in spite of the fact he buys the cheapest he can.

Kariachi

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #837 on: August 01, 2013, 01:52:26 PM »
Re the above house stories, my parents paid $10,500 for their 900 sq. ft. house in 1952, it sold for $444K in 2005.  That's living in the Bay Area for you.

My grandparents paid 15k for their home about 55 years ago. Thirteen years ago they sold it for, due to the renovations my grandfather did and the fact that it was now closer to NYC, about 300k. The buyers sold it a few years back, when it officially reached 'outskirts' position, for somewhere around double that.

Meanwhile our place is about twice the size and cost 80k. Nice place too. Floors aren't level, but neither is anything else in this county.
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Piratelvr1121

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #838 on: August 01, 2013, 02:42:17 PM »
Our floors aren't level either. In fact you'd be hard pressed to find a straight line in this house. We like to say the house is as crooked as we are, but we like it that way. 
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Cheapskate stories
« Reply #839 on: August 01, 2013, 03:42:54 PM »
Quote
hat is weird because many times a round trip is cheaper then a 1 way!
Ah, I was making the interesting assumption that, of course, everyone was familiar with the kind of traveler I meant.

These are people who can't buy a round trip ticket because they have no idea when they will return. It's sort of "I'm going to quit my job, take off for some country where I can live cheaply, and see how long my money lasts." There are ways to do this that result in returning home, not completely destitute, with the memories of a lifetime. That's for another thread about travel.

The cheapskates fall into two categories. Those who want to squeeze every penny in every way, to travel as cheaply as possible for the longest times. These are the ones most likely to expect the embassy to fly them home. And those who think it's a great game to see how low a price they can get for something, even if they are relatively well off.

Both kinds tend to do the same things. Common examples I hear about, some less ethical than others: Bragging about bargaining for half an hour until the old lady in the vegetable market lowers the price by 25. In a country where that might mean a day's ration of rice for the old lady. Bragging about browbeating the guesthouse owner into cutting the price of the room in half. Not worrying about any problems associated with staying in a cheap fleabag that doubles as a brothel. Riding for free on the top of a train. Sleeping on the floor of the train station.

Nutrax
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