Author Topic: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?  (Read 8505 times)

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Green Bean

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Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« on: March 31, 2013, 06:15:30 PM »
DH and I were talking about different ethnic foods, the popularity of Italian specifically. He pondered whether or not Mexican food (tacos, burritos, enchiladas, etc) are popular globally or just N.A.  I thought that would be a good question for the e-hell folks.  So, what say you?

Awestruck Shmuck

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2013, 06:56:42 PM »
Mexican food is gaining popularity in Australia - but there's a lot of fuss from a tiny % of people that question how authentic it is. I think most mexican places here serve 'tex-mex' - but I have been to one restaurant that is said to be very authentic, and it was amazing!!

hyzenthlay

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #2 on: March 31, 2013, 07:08:08 PM »
I'm going to say no, because outside of Mexico and New Mexico the critical ingredient of chili pepper is relatively hard to find  ;D  I mean seriously, you go up to Colorado and the think green chili involves bell peppers  :P

Some individual aspects are becoming more wide spread. Tortillas are used as the basis for 'wraps' in many places. But actual 'Mexican' is pretty heavy on corn and squash and beans, and that's a far cry from the Mexican American mix which heavier on beef, cheese, and lettuce and tomato for garnish.


Nibsey

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #3 on: March 31, 2013, 07:24:44 PM »
It's pretty popular in Dublin. Mexican tapas restaurants and Burrito stalls are where all the hipsters are hanging out.  ::) Before that was the bubble tea places and before that was the milkshake places. I don't like chili or beans so sufficient to say I preferred the milkshake craze. Mmmh Cadburys Cream egg milkshake.  ;D
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Iris

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #4 on: March 31, 2013, 07:36:15 PM »
Mexican food is gaining popularity in Australia - but there's a lot of fuss from a tiny % of people that question how authentic it is. I think most mexican places here serve 'tex-mex' - but I have been to one restaurant that is said to be very authentic, and it was amazing!!

I have been to several Mexican restaurants (in Australia), all of which claim to sell really, truly authentic Mexican food. Pity that there's so much difference between them  ::). Then again food snobs have patiently explained to me that just about every ethnic food I have ever eaten is wrong in some way, or if it is right it is only right for a small area of the country in question. Now I just go for whatever I personally find yummy.

My kids love Mexican food and regularly beg for it for dinner, so I would say in my house at least it's pretty popular.
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BigBadBetty

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #5 on: March 31, 2013, 08:00:12 PM »
I'm going to say no, because outside of Mexico and New Mexico the critical ingredient of chili pepper is relatively hard to find  ;D  I mean seriously, you go up to Colorado and the think green chili involves bell peppers  :P

I don't find that to be true. I was in a small town Wisconsin grocery yesterday. Even though though there produce section is pretty sad, they had fresh jalapenos, serranos, poblanos, plaintains, cilantro, tomatillos, masa and a variety of tortillas. This small town also has a Mexican grocery store with a small attached restaurant. The Mexican market has enough ingredients to make mole and pipian from scratch.

hyzenthlay

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #6 on: March 31, 2013, 08:37:20 PM »
I'm going to say no, because outside of Mexico and New Mexico the critical ingredient of chili pepper is relatively hard to find  ;D  I mean seriously, you go up to Colorado and the think green chili involves bell peppers  :P

I don't find that to be true. I was in a small town Wisconsin grocery yesterday. Even though though there produce section is pretty sad, they had fresh jalapenos, serranos, poblanos, plaintains, cilantro, tomatillos, masa and a variety of tortillas. This small town also has a Mexican grocery store with a small attached restaurant. The Mexican market has enough ingredients to make mole and pipian from scratch.

Well I meant more in terms of prepared food and restaurants.

I can buy every thing I need to make about any middle eastern dish you care to name, but there's no more then a couple of restaurants that serve middle eastern food of any kind here.

merryns

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #7 on: March 31, 2013, 08:50:19 PM »
I'm going to say no, because outside of Mexico and New Mexico the critical ingredient of chili pepper is relatively hard to find  ;D  I mean seriously, you go up to Colorado and the think green chili involves bell peppers  :P

Some individual aspects are becoming more wide spread. Tortillas are used as the basis for 'wraps' in many places. But actual 'Mexican' is pretty heavy on corn and squash and beans, and that's a far cry from the Mexican American mix which heavier on beef, cheese, and lettuce and tomato for garnish.

Chain Mexican restaurants that use a lot of beef are common in Australia. Chillies are very commonly available for home cooking and in restaurants. They are a common ingredient in Indian and SE Asian cuisines.

something.new.every.day

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #8 on: March 31, 2013, 10:19:27 PM »
I'm going to say no, because outside of Mexico and New Mexico the critical ingredient of chili pepper is relatively hard to find  ;D  I mean seriously, you go up to Colorado and the think green chili involves bell peppers  :P

Some individual aspects are becoming more wide spread. Tortillas are used as the basis for 'wraps' in many places. But actual 'Mexican' is pretty heavy on corn and squash and beans, and that's a far cry from the Mexican American mix which heavier on beef, cheese, and lettuce and tomato for garnish.

I'm a Coloradan and we use green chiles NOT green peppers.  Also, we have a ton of authentic Mexican food up here, which should be no surprise as we have many immigrants living here. 

hyzenthlay

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #9 on: March 31, 2013, 10:41:25 PM »
I'm going to say no, because outside of Mexico and New Mexico the critical ingredient of chili pepper is relatively hard to find  ;D  I mean seriously, you go up to Colorado and the think green chili involves bell peppers  :P

Some individual aspects are becoming more wide spread. Tortillas are used as the basis for 'wraps' in many places. But actual 'Mexican' is pretty heavy on corn and squash and beans, and that's a far cry from the Mexican American mix which heavier on beef, cheese, and lettuce and tomato for garnish.

I'm a Coloradan and we use green chiles NOT green peppers.  Also, we have a ton of authentic Mexican food up here, which should be no surprise as we have many immigrants living here.

Well tell that to the guy that I purchased a breakfast burrito from in Denver. It's the weirdest thing to expect green chili and get green bell pepper.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2013, 11:10:21 PM by hyzenthlay »

Sharnita

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #10 on: March 31, 2013, 11:05:59 PM »
About 15 years ago we hosted a young man who was visiting from Germany.  We asked if he had ever had Mexican food and he answered that he had - Taco Bell.  We took him someplace a bit more authentic.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #11 on: April 01, 2013, 12:10:27 AM »
About 15 years ago we hosted a young man who was visiting from Germany.  We asked if he had ever had Mexican food and he answered that he had - Taco Bell.  We took him someplace a bit more authentic.

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Promise

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #12 on: April 01, 2013, 12:11:47 AM »
I went to a Mexican restaurant in Brasil.

Shotochick

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #13 on: April 01, 2013, 06:25:54 AM »
I love Mexican food - used to go to a fabulous tacquera in Sydney, and even checked out a new place when we were home in Feb.

In London, there is not a lot of great Mexican - the exception being the Wahaca chain. I tend to go there when I want to get my margaritas on. Big time.

Otherwise - I go DIY now. I even have a stash of masa harina to make my own tortillas (and although I have a tortilla press, i prefer to just bash them out, great stress relief!)

Oh and the Cool Chili Company have a fabulous stand at Borough market, or I order online from them. Currently have about 8 different types of canned and dried chilies in the cupboard!
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iridaceae

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Re: Is Mexican food popular outside North America?
« Reply #14 on: April 01, 2013, 07:11:33 AM »
I'm going to say no, because outside of Mexico and New Mexico the critical ingredient of chili pepper is relatively hard to find  ;D  I mean seriously, you go up to Colorado and the think green chili involves bell peppers  :P


But the Sonoran cuisine is more savory than spicy; there are a few dishes which are spicy but visitors who come here and go to Mexican restaurants serving Sonoran cuisine are usually surprised that it is not loaded with chiles.