Author Topic: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence  (Read 12174 times)

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Two Ravens

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Re: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence
« Reply #105 on: April 05, 2013, 09:07:43 PM »
Why are all the OP bashers ignoring the original post:

"However, she does not primarily reside in the school district.  She lives elsewhere but uses a mail drop inside the school district."

Because, when questioned, the sole evidence the OP has given is the fact that the OP works a low paying job, and one questionable conversation with the people at the person's stated place of residence.

(I don't believe that there is a policy here that we can never question OP's on the state of their assertions. We are all fallible, after all).


I actually find it quite odd that the OP, within a few minutes' acquaintanceship with the neighbour, know all the details about her income, whether she receives alimony/child support, daycare expenses etc.  I'm not saying that it's unbelievable, just odd IMO.  I don't know the salaries of my closest relatives/friends!

No one is "ignoring" the initial post, but many of us find the assertion that "she can't live in the district because she couldn't possibly afford to do so" completely irrelevant.

Because you have it backwards.  She has been a casual acquaintance of the neighbor for awhile and then when she got the letter and took it to the house, the owner of the house screwed up her story.


There's no indication of that in post # 30 - that it was not until she took the mis-delivered letter to her.  It sounds to me as though she acquired this info fairly early on.

And anyway, I find it very odd that misdelivered mail would warrent a detailed conversation. wouldn't you normally just leave it in their box?

Docslady21

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Re: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence
« Reply #106 on: April 05, 2013, 09:08:00 PM »
Why are all the OP bashers ignoring the original post:

"However, she does not primarily reside in the school district.  She lives elsewhere but uses a mail drop inside the school district."

Because, when questioned, the sole evidence the OP has given is the fact that the OP works a low paying job, and one questionable conversation with the people at the person's stated place of residence.

(I don't believe that there is a policy here that we can never question OP's on the state of their assertions. We are all fallible, after all).


I actually find it quite odd that the OP, within a few minutes' acquaintanceship with the neighbour, know all the details about her income, whether she receives alimony/child support, daycare expenses etc.  I'm not saying that it's unbelievable, just odd IMO.  I don't know the salaries of my closest relatives/friends!

No one is "ignoring" the initial post, but many of us find the assertion that "she can't live in the district because she couldn't possibly afford to do so" completely irrelevant.

Because you have it backwards.  She has been a casual acquaintance of the neighbor for awhile and then when she got the letter and took it to the house, the owner of the house screwed up her story.


There's no indication of that in post # 30 - that it was not until she took the mis-delivered letter to her.  It sounds to me as though she acquired this info fairly early on.

Right. She got to know the woman, and her financial/personal info, and THEN received a misdirected letter, discovered the mail drop scheme and put it all together. All of which is completely not even relevant to the OP's question, which was whether or not she should try to be nice and discourage the woman BEFORE turning the evidence in and whether or not she was bound by any sort of etiquette to do so.

Docslady21

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Re: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence
« Reply #107 on: April 05, 2013, 09:10:42 PM »
Why are all the OP bashers ignoring the original post:

"However, she does not primarily reside in the school district.  She lives elsewhere but uses a mail drop inside the school district."

Because, when questioned, the sole evidence the OP has given is the fact that the OP works a low paying job, and one questionable conversation with the people at the person's stated place of residence.

(I don't believe that there is a policy here that we can never question OP's on the state of their assertions. We are all fallible, after all).


I actually find it quite odd that the OP, within a few minutes' acquaintanceship with the neighbour, know all the details about her income, whether she receives alimony/child support, daycare expenses etc.  I'm not saying that it's unbelievable, just odd IMO.  I don't know the salaries of my closest relatives/friends!

No one is "ignoring" the initial post, but many of us find the assertion that "she can't live in the district because she couldn't possibly afford to do so" completely irrelevant.

Because you have it backwards.  She has been a casual acquaintance of the neighbor for awhile and then when she got the letter and took it to the house, the owner of the house screwed up her story.


There's no indication of that in post # 30 - that it was not until she took the mis-delivered letter to her.  It sounds to me as though she acquired this info fairly early on.

And anyway, I find it very odd that misdelivered mail would warrent a detailed conversation. wouldn't you normally just leave it in their box?

Not if you knew the person it was addressed to didn't live in the house it was addressed to. I'd definitely say something, say, "Hi! I have Sally's mail. I didn't know she lived here! I thought she lived over on Main St.?"

Two Ravens

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Re: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence
« Reply #108 on: April 05, 2013, 09:14:49 PM »
Why are all the OP bashers ignoring the original post:

"However, she does not primarily reside in the school district.  She lives elsewhere but uses a mail drop inside the school district."

Because, when questioned, the sole evidence the OP has given is the fact that the OP works a low paying job, and one questionable conversation with the people at the person's stated place of residence.

(I don't believe that there is a policy here that we can never question OP's on the state of their assertions. We are all fallible, after all).


I actually find it quite odd that the OP, within a few minutes' acquaintanceship with the neighbour, know all the details about her income, whether she receives alimony/child support, daycare expenses etc.  I'm not saying that it's unbelievable, just odd IMO.  I don't know the salaries of my closest relatives/friends!

No one is "ignoring" the initial post, but many of us find the assertion that "she can't live in the district because she couldn't possibly afford to do so" completely irrelevant.

Because you have it backwards.  She has been a casual acquaintance of the neighbor for awhile and then when she got the letter and took it to the house, the owner of the house screwed up her story.


There's no indication of that in post # 30 - that it was not until she took the mis-delivered letter to her.  It sounds to me as though she acquired this info fairly early on.

And anyway, I find it very odd that misdelivered mail would warrent a detailed conversation. wouldn't you normally just leave it in their box?

Not if you knew the person it was addressed to didn't live in the house it was addressed to. I'd definitely say something, say, "Hi! I have Sally's mail. I didn't know she lived here! I thought she lived over on Main St.?"

Nope! I certainly wouldn'r risk disturbing someone I had only met 3 times, then interrogate the person who answered the door about who lived there.

Poppea

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Re: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence
« Reply #109 on: April 05, 2013, 09:19:46 PM »
Why are all the OP bashers ignoring the original post:

"However, she does not primarily reside in the school district.  She lives elsewhere but uses a mail drop inside the school district."

Because, when questioned, the sole evidence the OP has given is the fact that the OP works a low paying job, and one questionable conversation with the people at the person's stated place of residence.

(I don't believe that there is a policy here that we can never question OP's on the state of their assertions. We are all fallible, after all).


I actually find it quite odd that the OP, within a few minutes' acquaintanceship with the neighbour, know all the details about her income, whether she receives alimony/child support, daycare expenses etc.  I'm not saying that it's unbelievable, just odd IMO.  I don't know the salaries of my closest relatives/friends!

No one is "ignoring" the initial post, but many of us find the assertion that "she can't live in the district because she couldn't possibly afford to do so" completely irrelevant.

Because you have it backwards.  She has been a casual acquaintance of the neighbor for awhile and then when she got the letter and took it to the house, the owner of the house screwed up her story.


There's no indication of that in post # 30 - that it was not until she took the mis-delivered letter to her.  It sounds to me as though she acquired this info fairly early on.

And anyway, I find it very odd that misdelivered mail would warrent a detailed conversation. wouldn't you normally just leave it in their box?

Not if you knew the person it was addressed to didn't live in the house it was addressed to. I'd definitely say something, say, "Hi! I have Sally's mail. I didn't know she lived here! I thought she lived over on Main St.?"

Nope! I certainly wouldn't risk disturbing someone I had only met 3 times, then interrogate the person who answered the door about who lived there.

That's certainly a hostile way to look at it. 

The OP received a letter that belonged to the neighbor,  She was nice enough to walk it over to the house on the envelope.  She then rang the bell in order to make sure to correct person received the letter.  She asked if the addressee lived there or was home.  The home owner then somehow screwed up her cover story.


fountainsoflettuce

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Re: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence
« Reply #110 on: April 05, 2013, 09:22:46 PM »
Why are all the OP bashers ignoring the original post:

"However, she does not primarily reside in the school district.  She lives elsewhere but uses a mail drop inside the school district."

Because, when questioned, the sole evidence the OP has given is the fact that the OP works a low paying job, and one questionable conversation with the people at the person's stated place of residence.

(I don't believe that there is a policy here that we can never question OP's on the state of their assertions. We are all fallible, after all).


I actually find it quite odd that the OP, within a few minutes' acquaintanceship with the neighbour, know all the details about her income, whether she receives alimony/child support, daycare expenses etc.  I'm not saying that it's unbelievable, just odd IMO.  I don't know the salaries of my closest relatives/friends!

No one is "ignoring" the initial post, but many of us find the assertion that "she can't live in the district because she couldn't possibly afford to do so" completely irrelevant.

Because you have it backwards.  She has been a casual acquaintance of the neighbor for awhile and then when she got the letter and took it to the house, the owner of the house screwed up her story.


There's no indication of that in post # 30 - that it was not until she took the mis-delivered letter to her.  It sounds to me as though she acquired this info fairly early on.

And anyway, I find it very odd that misdelivered mail would warrent a detailed conversation. wouldn't you normally just leave it in their box?

Not if you knew the person it was addressed to didn't live in the house it was addressed to. I'd definitely say something, say, "Hi! I have Sally's mail. I didn't know she lived here! I thought she lived over on Main St.?"

Nope! I certainly wouldn'r risk disturbing someone I had only met 3 times, then interrogate the person who answered the door about who lived there.

DocsLady has the correct timeline.

 Woman uses an actual address as a mail drop. I went there to drop off the mis-delivered letter. Person  (not the Woman) answered door said "She doesnt live here." Akward pause. "I mean she uh I'll give her the letter." Door slammed shut.

Not much of an interrogation or else I should be hired by the military for my interrogation skillz.

twiggy

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Re: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence
« Reply #111 on: April 05, 2013, 09:23:54 PM »
I've received mail for my neighbors 3 times in the past 2 years. I always ring the bell and hand it to them. It somehow feels off to me to just drop it in the box. You're being neighborly by giving them the misdelivered mail, but not feeling neighborly enough to knock and say "hi"?  :-\
In the United States today, there is a pervasive tendency to treat children as adults, and adults as children.  The options of children are thus steadily expanded, while those of adults are progressively constricted.  The result is unruly children and childish adults.  ~Thomas Szasz

Wordgeek

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Re: Asking a "Neighbor" about their primary place of residence
« Reply #112 on: April 05, 2013, 09:26:49 PM »
I'm locking the topic for now, to allow people to catch up on the the reading.

Just as a general note, if you find the quote tree getting longer than 3 or 4 posts, chances are the discussion is getting out of hand.