Author Topic: When people misuse words  (Read 7188 times)

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snowdragon

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #45 on: April 08, 2013, 11:27:10 PM »
A former supervisor (Dr. So-and-So) stood up in the middle of a company-wide meeting and was speaking about something I cannot remember right now.  The subject of that meeting has forever been banished from my brain because all I can think about, whenever I think about that day, is how she got up in front of everybody and said, "Okay, so irregardless of what you heard, blah blah blah."

This woman has a PhD in English.  I still cringe when I think about it.


While Webster's advises against its use - they do call it a word. It's just non-standard but its not that bad. 


http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/irregardless

diesel_darlin

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #46 on: April 08, 2013, 11:50:01 PM »
My dad was watching some TV show last night about the manufacture of weapons or something. I wasnt really paying attention. My ears perked up when the narrator said "nuke ya lurrrr" instead of "new clee yur".  :o

PastryGoddess

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #47 on: April 09, 2013, 02:39:42 AM »
I have caught myself using the word conversate while speaking.  I have to immediately stop and correct myself.  I'm still not sure how it got into my vocabulary...I know better

athersgeo

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #48 on: April 09, 2013, 04:24:05 AM »
Two mispronunciations/misused terms that used to get my father's goat (and that I cannot hear now without hearing the echo of my father's ghost!):

Vun-ra-bul instead of Vuln-ra-bul

Train station instead of railway station (he was a railways enthusiast which probably helps explain this particular bee in his bonnet)

And a case of a mis-used word (or two):
An apostrophe, a double quote, a comma and an exclamation mark all mean vastly different things in most contexts, but when you're writing programming, getting the right one in the right place can be the difference between your code compiling and not. One of my former coworkers used to frequently (but not always) say comma when she meant apostrophe and apostrophe when she meant double quote and then used to get VERY upset if you attempted to clarify which she meant. I got accused of being pedantic more than once because "I OBVIOUSLY knew what she meant" - uh, no, no I didn't; that was why I was asking.

starry diadem

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #49 on: April 09, 2013, 04:53:34 AM »
Disorientated is not a word.  {rest snipped}

Both orientated and disorientated are British English usage,and are defined in the Oxford English Dictionary, which is the world standard dictionary for British English.  They are words, even if not standard US use.
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crella

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #50 on: April 09, 2013, 05:25:31 AM »
My brother says "Ec cetera" and it drives me nuts. He can't seem to stop though  :D

If I spend a lot of time with my niece, the following few days I have to bite my tongue to stop saying 'like'  :o

MissNomer

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #51 on: April 09, 2013, 07:11:35 AM »
I work in a medical billing office and the things some of my fellow coworkers actually notate on the accounts drive me batty. While it's possible for a patient to "deny" setting up a payment plan, you probably mean decline. The patient will probably pay the remaining balance, not the "reaming" balance.

All time favorite is when someone called a displeased patient and wrote that they "became irate and started using profound language."
« Last Edit: April 09, 2013, 07:39:16 AM by MissNomer »

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athersgeo

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #52 on: April 09, 2013, 08:24:41 AM »
Writhing
Writing

This one used to be quite common in fanfic circles - especially in the, uh, smuttier stories. You'd come across people who were "writing in passion", which is a mental image I've always rather loved. Less commonly, you might also find people "writhing an essay".

Viscous
Vicious

I've seen this in published work as well as fanfic, and it's almost always about "viscous fights". I did ask one culprit if her protagonists were wrestling in treacle. She didn't get it...

Marital
Martial

Another one very common in fanfic circles. I think the all up best (worst?) version I saw was someone who was describing a character who was a black belt as an "expert in marital arts", although the person who had a couple going off to their bedroom to practice "martial arts" comes a pretty close second. A close third would be the story that had The Emperor "declaring marital law" in the galaxy.

Lastly, my second favourite ever "typo" (can't post my first fav because the filters won't let me!):
"They parted monuments later."

Mental Magpie

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #53 on: April 09, 2013, 09:01:20 AM »
Two mispronunciations/misused terms that used to get my father's goat (and that I cannot hear now without hearing the echo of my father's ghost!):

Vun-ra-bul instead of Vuln-ra-bul

Train station instead of railway station (he was a railways enthusiast which probably helps explain this particular bee in his bonnet)

And a case of a mis-used word (or two):
An apostrophe, a double quote, a comma and an exclamation mark all mean vastly different things in most contexts, but when you're writing programming, getting the right one in the right place can be the difference between your code compiling and not. One of my former coworkers used to frequently (but not always) say comma when she meant apostrophe and apostrophe when she meant double quote and then used to get VERY upset if you attempted to clarify which she meant. I got accused of being pedantic more than once because "I OBVIOUSLY knew what she meant" - uh, no, no I didn't; that was why I was asking.

I wonder what he would do with me?  I pronounce it "VUL-ner-uh-ble".
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athersgeo

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #54 on: April 09, 2013, 09:04:05 AM »
Two mispronunciations/misused terms that used to get my father's goat (and that I cannot hear now without hearing the echo of my father's ghost!):

Vun-ra-bul instead of Vuln-ra-bul

Train station instead of railway station (he was a railways enthusiast which probably helps explain this particular bee in his bonnet)

And a case of a mis-used word (or two):
An apostrophe, a double quote, a comma and an exclamation mark all mean vastly different things in most contexts, but when you're writing programming, getting the right one in the right place can be the difference between your code compiling and not. One of my former coworkers used to frequently (but not always) say comma when she meant apostrophe and apostrophe when she meant double quote and then used to get VERY upset if you attempted to clarify which she meant. I got accused of being pedantic more than once because "I OBVIOUSLY knew what she meant" - uh, no, no I didn't; that was why I was asking.

I wonder what he would do with me?  I pronounce it "VUL-ner-uh-ble".

He'd have probably grimaced, but said "At least she knows there's an l in there!"

scotcat60

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #55 on: April 09, 2013, 09:19:48 AM »
Someone asking me to "borrow" them a pen - they meant LOAN them a pen.....but kept using asking me to borrow them something instead of if they could borrow the item. 

When i was a primary school, my teacher pointed out that to say "Can I lend your pen?" is incorrect, when what you should really say is "Can I borrow your pen?"

I once told someone i would give him a piece of Sellotape, as if he borrowed it, it mean that he would have to give it back, and from a practical point of view, that was not really possible.


Mental Magpie

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #56 on: April 09, 2013, 09:21:34 AM »
Someone asking me to "borrow" them a pen - they meant LOAN them a pen.....but kept using asking me to borrow them something instead of if they could borrow the item. 

When i was a primary school, my teacher pointed out that to say "Can I lend your pen?" is incorrect, when what you should really say is "Can I borrow your pen?"

I once told someone i would give him a piece of Sellotape, as if he borrowed it, it mean that he would have to give it back, and from a practical point of view, that was not really possible.

There's a difference, though, in the sentence structure.

"May I borrow your pen?"

vs

"Will you lend me your pen?"
The problem with choosing the lesser of two evils is that you're still choosing evil.

SamiHami

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #57 on: April 09, 2013, 09:27:37 AM »
Oh, and I musn't forget another one that makes me stabby. The word is temperature, not tempachur.

On the other end of the spectrum is a former friend who always went out of her way to overpronounce words, to the point of being ridiculous. When saying February, the "r" is usually silent. Some people do pronounce it. But ex-friend would always overdo it; FebROOOary. Samething with raspberry...she always overemphasized the "p" to a ridiculous extent (rass-PUH-berry).

I asked her once why she did that and her response was something along the lines of her having superior intelligence and some other nonsense. She always did have a superiority complex.

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athersgeo

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #58 on: April 09, 2013, 09:28:19 AM »
Someone asking me to "borrow" them a pen - they meant LOAN them a pen.....but kept using asking me to borrow them something instead of if they could borrow the item. 

When i was a primary school, my teacher pointed out that to say "Can I lend your pen?" is incorrect, when what you should really say is "Can I borrow your pen?"

I once told someone i would give him a piece of Sellotape, as if he borrowed it, it mean that he would have to give it back, and from a practical point of view, that was not really possible.

There's a difference, though, in the sentence structure.

"May I borrow your pen?"

vs

"Will you lend me your pen?"

Eh, yes and no. What Scotcat60 is talking about (I think) is the dialect of English that uses the construction "Can I have a lend of" for "Can I borrow" - the teacher wasn't (I don't think) saying lend is never right; just that particular use.

(I should note it's not a construction I've ever heard anyone use, but I've seen it in books written in the 1950s [the character was from Hampshire and was described as having a "Hampshire" accent])

Mental Magpie

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #59 on: April 09, 2013, 09:48:54 AM »
Someone asking me to "borrow" them a pen - they meant LOAN them a pen.....but kept using asking me to borrow them something instead of if they could borrow the item. 

When i was a primary school, my teacher pointed out that to say "Can I lend your pen?" is incorrect, when what you should really say is "Can I borrow your pen?"

I once told someone i would give him a piece of Sellotape, as if he borrowed it, it mean that he would have to give it back, and from a practical point of view, that was not really possible.

There's a difference, though, in the sentence structure.

"May I borrow your pen?"

vs

"Will you lend me your pen?"

Eh, yes and no. What Scotcat60 is talking about (I think) is the dialect of English that uses the construction "Can I have a lend of" for "Can I borrow" - the teacher wasn't (I don't think) saying lend is never right; just that particular use.

(I should note it's not a construction I've ever heard anyone use, but I've seen it in books written in the 1950s [the character was from Hampshire and was described as having a "Hampshire" accent])

That's not what scotcat60 wrote, though.

scotcat60, will you clarify, please?
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