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Author Topic: When people misuse words  (Read 38796 times)

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AuntieA

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #105 on: April 10, 2013, 11:51:06 PM »
BF sometimes misuses words. The most common are:

atypical - as in "your reaction is an atypical female one, all the women I've ever know react the same way." No dear, that would be typical.

droll - "I know you thought that movie was really funny, but I found it droll." No, you didn't find anything funny about it. That`s not what droll means.

There are more, but I get headaches from correcting him all the time. He is an intelligent man, he just misuses words sometimes.
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Venus193

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #106 on: April 11, 2013, 05:28:12 AM »

Bwahaha. My DH and I constantly make fun of Gordon Ramsey for his "amazing everything". At some point he was showing people these ingredients...and it was just...

"We've got for you some of the most...AMAZING... local lamb, with these amazing heirloom tomatoes, with the most amazing organic carrots and this amazing rice..."

Really, Gordon? You're 43 years old, you've been in a kitchen for at least 20 years, and CARROTS still amaze you?

Also starting to hate the fact that "Sexy" is sneaking in to the kitchen. Your ravioli are not sexy.

Neither are business presentations or products that have nothing to do with sex.  This one annoys me, too.





cabbageweevil

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #107 on: April 11, 2013, 05:38:27 AM »
Train station instead of railway station (he was a railways enthusiast which probably helps explain this particular bee in his bonnet)
Coming in rather belatedly --athersgeo, are you (like me) in the UK? I ask because you write "railway", rather than "railroad".

I'm a railway enthusiast; some of my fellow-hobbyists over here, likewise loathe this expression "train", instead of "railway", station. An Americanism, I gather, increasingly getting used in the UK. I always say / write "railway station", but "train station" doesn't bother me much. Except for a couple of pet hates, I tend not to get upset about the rise of new ways of putting things: language has always changed and evolved...

I'd had the impression that at least in times past, the place where you get on and off trains was often called in the US, a railroad "depot", as an equivalent to "station"; but maybe I have that wrongly?

scotcat60

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #108 on: April 11, 2013, 07:40:35 AM »
I'm a railway enthusiast; some of my fellow-hobbyists over here, likewise loathe this expression "train", instead of "railway", station

Possibly they are trying to differentiate between a bus station, coach station and railway station. To me station in connection with transport means somewhere you go to catch a train, i do not add railway, e.g. I would say Euston, or London Bridge station,

Thipu1

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #109 on: April 11, 2013, 07:41:46 AM »
I've always considered 'depot' to mean a major railway terminal with the capacity to handle freight while 'station' means a smaller, local place to catch a train. 

  However, there's a classic book, 'Down at the Depot.  American Railroad Stations from 1831 to 1920', so the issue may be moot. 


Barney girl

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #110 on: April 11, 2013, 07:54:19 AM »
I can't remember if I've posted this before, but I can pinpoint almost exactly when I first heard the term 'train station' - it was either the last Saturday of September or first of October 1983 at Tesco, Five Lane Ends, Birmingham. I was at the University Freshers week and asked the cashier where the nearest station was as I was intending going into the city centre. She said - "Do you mean the train station?". I'd never heard the term before and I think I thought it was a West Midlands one, not one coming in from America.

What I do dislike is the announcements "The next station stop will be ..." I know they're excluding unexpected stops by saying this, but credit the passengers (sorry, customers) with a little common sense please  ::)

Thipu1

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #111 on: April 11, 2013, 08:56:13 AM »
The announcements don't bother me.  I assume that they're for the benefit of passengers with impaired vision. 

WillyNilly

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #112 on: April 11, 2013, 09:12:01 AM »
What I do dislike is the announcements "The next station stop will be ..." I know they're excluding unexpected stops by saying this, but credit the passengers (sorry, customers) with a little common sense please  ::)

I don't understand this. What do you mean by common sense? Not every passenger has a train map in front of them or has memorized the line. They need to know when their stop is next so they can gather up their stuff (put in their coat, put their book into their bag, etc) to get off promptly.

Layla Miller

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #113 on: April 11, 2013, 10:05:03 AM »
What I do dislike is the announcements "The next station stop will be ..." I know they're excluding unexpected stops by saying this, but credit the passengers (sorry, customers) with a little common sense please  ::)

I don't understand this. What do you mean by common sense? Not every passenger has a train map in front of them or has memorized the line. They need to know when their stop is next so they can gather up their stuff (put in their coat, put their book into their bag, etc) to get off promptly.

And there's people like me, who is a big old worrywart and was scared to death of missing my stop when I took the train a few times on a visit to NYC a few years ago.  Those announcements gave me some badly needed peace of mind!
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Anniissa

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #114 on: April 11, 2013, 10:28:18 AM »
What I do dislike is the announcements "The next station stop will be ..." I know they're excluding unexpected stops by saying this, but credit the passengers (sorry, customers) with a little common sense please  ::)

I don't understand this. What do you mean by common sense? Not every passenger has a train map in front of them or has memorized the line. They need to know when their stop is next so they can gather up their stuff (put in their coat, put their book into their bag, etc) to get off promptly.

I don't think Barney Girl was complaining about the announcements in general but the additional word "Station" rather than "The next stop is..." as, presumably barring emergencies, all stops are necessarily at stations so the "station" appears rather superfluous.

cabbageweevil

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #115 on: April 11, 2013, 10:33:18 AM »
Thanks all, for thoughts. Thipu 1 -- "depot" -- maybe a thing largely from times past, maybe a bit of wishful-thinking re different American / British parlance.

"Next station stop" announcements -- I tend to feel (as with Thipu 1, Willy Nilly and Layla Miller) -- never underestimate people's capacity for getting things wrong: wise, and considerate, in announcements, to differentiate between station stops, and unscheduled stops for signals or whatever -- which, re Anniissa's post, do quite often happen.

I sometimes muse on how wretched things must have been for passengers in Britain and continental Europe in World War 2, when -- with people being worried / hopeful about the other lot, invading their territory -- railway station nameboards were taken away (likewise, on the roads, signposts, and "welcome to / you are leaving" town signs) -- so as to make things as difficult as possible for potential invaders.  Presumably, the same with on-train announcements: don't risk giving help to travelling bad guys...

At the risk of going way off-topic: I've always liked the thing about newsreels in Britain in 1940, showing signs reading "Welcome to [name diligently blocked out] -- Birthplace of William Shakespeare". I gather that the audiences fell about laughing...

BeagleMommy

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #116 on: April 11, 2013, 02:55:20 PM »
I just remembered a friend of my mother who could butcher the English language better than any one I knew.  Two examples:

1.  She worked in a small snack bar in the local hospital.  A customer asked for ketchup.  She said "We don't have packets.  There are ketchup and mustard suspenders over there."  She meant dispensers.

2.  Her newborn nephew had just had a circumcision.  She said "His poor little intestines were all swollen."  Anyone want to guess what she meant?

reflection5

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #117 on: April 11, 2013, 03:14:18 PM »
Quote
2.  Her newborn nephew had just had a circumcision.  She said "His poor little intestines were all swollen."  Anyone want to guess what she meant?

Oh my goodness.  ???  :-[  (scratching my head)

Outdoor Girl

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #118 on: April 11, 2013, 04:26:00 PM »
In honour of Toby Keith, was she referring to his 'vegetables'?   :D
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Barney girl

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Re: When people misuse words
« Reply #119 on: April 11, 2013, 04:40:47 PM »
What I do dislike is the announcements "The next station stop will be ..." I know they're excluding unexpected stops by saying this, but credit the passengers (sorry, customers) with a little common sense please  ::)

I don't understand this. What do you mean by common sense? Not every passenger has a train map in front of them or has memorized the line. They need to know when their stop is next so they can gather up their stuff (put in their coat, put their book into their bag, etc) to get off promptly.

I don't think Barney Girl was complaining about the announcements in general but the additional word "Station" rather than "The next stop is..." as, presumably barring emergencies, all stops are necessarily at stations so the "station" appears rather superfluous.

Thanks. Yes, that's what I meant. Either say "the next station is..." or "the next stop is...".  To combine them seems to suggest the think we're going to try climbing out of the train when it stops at a signal on red.