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  • July 23, 2016, 10:26:33 PM

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Author Topic: Children In Finding The Right Activity Verses Giving Up  (Read 3144 times)

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bopper

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Re: Children In Finding The Right Activity Verses Giving Up
« Reply #45 on: November 09, 2015, 10:09:32 AM »
I personally am not a fan of many team sports as I do find they are all about the best players to the determent of the average player and it can really play on your self-esteem.

On Recreational teams, the good players usually move on to the Travel leagues so what is left is more homogeneous.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Children In Finding The Right Activity Verses Giving Up
« Reply #46 on: November 09, 2015, 10:45:18 AM »
I personally am not a fan of many team sports as I do find they are all about the best players to the determent of the average player and it can really play on your self-esteem.

On Recreational teams, the good players usually move on to the Travel leagues so what is left is more homogeneous.

This was my brother.  He played 'house' league hockey, growing up.  He loved it.  He was never the star but worked hard and played hard and was an asset to any team.  There was always an 'all-star' team that had the best players plucked from the house leagues to be a travel team.  One year, the all-star team was decimated by injuries so they were scouting the house leagues for players to fill out their bench.  And were shocked when my brother turned them down.  He told them that he was playing hockey to play, not ride the bench, and was quite happy to have ample playing time while playing house league hockey.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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siamesecat2965

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Re: Children In Finding The Right Activity Verses Giving Up
« Reply #47 on: November 09, 2015, 11:15:59 AM »
I personally am not a fan of many team sports as I do find they are all about the best players to the determent of the average player and it can really play on your self-esteem.

On Recreational teams, the good players usually move on to the Travel leagues so what is left is more homogeneous.

Not so much when I was young. My town really just had the rec leagues, and the "better" more talented kids got the attention, playing time etc., while those of us who really wanted to just play, but maybe weren't as skilled, got less playing time, attention etc. I think now its different, but 40+ years ago, that's how it was.

Coralreef

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Re: Children In Finding The Right Activity Verses Giving Up
« Reply #48 on: November 09, 2015, 01:01:04 PM »
I would suggest short term activities, with alternating between sports and more art related activities. Any session that is started must be finished, not only because others may depend on him, but completing any task is a lesson in itself.

With DD and DS, only the swimming lessons were mandatory.  Luckily, they both enjoyed it.

They had pre-school activities such as dancing, painting, arts and crafts.
They tried karate (because Power Rangers) for 2 sessions.
They played ringette and hockey for 3 years.
DD participated in the annual school play, both as actress/dancer and making decorations.
DS did some mountain biking for a while.
Both of them are still enjoying different sporting activities now that they're adults.

Some children will like to do an activity but not necessarily be competitive at it and that is alright too.

I was never a competitive person when it came to sports.  I was about 8 or 9 and I wanted to learn to skate properly. I was not accepted because I was not good enough (duh!). That kind of turned me off for sports in general. I finally leaned when I took an adult class with other non-sporting people. However, I spent several years in choir / singing lessons and enjoyed it, even if I was never more than passable at it. The choir director always made everyone feel included and I'm sure a couple of kids discovered talents in themselves thanks to him.

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« Last Edit: November 09, 2015, 03:11:11 PM by Coralreef »

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artk2002

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Re: Children In Finding The Right Activity Verses Giving Up
« Reply #49 on: November 09, 2015, 03:56:03 PM »
I personally am not a fan of many team sports as I do find they are all about the best players to the determent of the average player and it can really play on your self-esteem.

On Recreational teams, the good players usually move on to the Travel leagues so what is left is more homogeneous.

Very true. There are recreational leagues in almost all sports that provide opportunities for everyone. For instance, there is AYSO for soccer. One of the 6 principles is Everybody Plays and so there is not an emphasis on the best player. The ones whose parents think that they are the next Beckham go to the club teams. Then they come back after riding the bench for a year or so. Rec leagues tend to be a lot less expensive, too. I think our AYSO region is about $120 year. Club teams can be well over $1000.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

DoubleTrouble

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Re: Children In Finding The Right Activity Verses Giving Up
« Reply #50 on: November 10, 2015, 11:26:08 AM »
My mum's rules (which I intend to stick with) were:

1) It's ok to try something and not like it. So we generally went to things a handful of times without the "proper" equipment until we were sure we liked it (think doing tap lessons in your plimsolls).

2) Once you've committed, you stick it out until either a) for the next few weeks in case it's just a hiccup or b) you've fulfilled your obligation (e.g. you've performed the play).

3) If something's making you MISERABLE, then you can quit.

Those are along the lines of my rules for my kids. My mom (a former music teacher) is simply horrified that I haven't had my kids take violin/piano/whatever lessons yet because of course my brother & I were in Suzuki at age 3 and we turned out fine. Well, I took my kids to several music introductory classes & they showed no interest. Why force them?

As for sports, we've tried a few. Soccer was one season only for both boys but my younger twin is really enjoying baseball. The older twin really likes to swim so I'm trying to find him an indoor pool where he can take lessons & potentially move into a swim club. I'll have them both take swim lessons as I think it's a very important skill to have but I don't see the younger one wanting to join a team. They both do karate at The Little Gym and love it but I'm really not going to push anything. I was pushed a lot as a child & hated it.

The older twin has also indicated a desire to try horseback riding so I've got a few places to check out in the spring for some intro lessons. My mom was (again) horrified that I would consider letting him do horseback riding but it's not like I"m going to be buying a horse so what's the big deal?