Author Topic: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread  (Read 56678 times)

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Elisabunny

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #120 on: April 11, 2013, 02:31:35 PM »
I've never referred to myself as an "American", I'm a New Yorker - everywhere I've ever traveled to (England, the Netherlands, Japan, Ireland, Canada, the Caribbean, Mexico, other states in the USA, etc, everyone knew what I meant when I said "New York". And if someone called me "American" I would clarify (not correct necessarily, but definitely clarify) "actually a New Yorker" because honestly while me and a person from California, or Oregon, or Iowa might all be from the same official country, we are from vastly different places and cultures.

However, it should be noted that very few states or cities have the kind of fervor that New York does.  I think you can just about wrap up that list with Texas and California.  I would never introduce myself as "a Pennsylvanian" because, honestly, living in Pennsylvania isn't that different from living in Florida.  I know, as I lived there for three months.  Other than climate and food/drinks, there's not much different.

Add Idaho to the list.  People around here are very proud to be Idahoans.  Although that might just be the south-east section, where there is a strong undercurrent of, "Heck no, we are not Utahns!"  (Sorry, Utah.)

You would say you're an Idahoan instead of an American?

Well, I wouldn't, but then I wasn't born here.  Some of the natives, I wouldn't put it past them. ;D
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Redwing

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #121 on: April 11, 2013, 02:42:06 PM »
Re: saying which state you're from

I love that I can say that I'm a Chicagoan and people understand.  We're just awesome like that.   ;D

Well, I live outside Chicago, but when I am in another state, I'll generally say that or near Chicago.  I was born there, so I guess I can say that!

When outside this country, I would say I'm an American.  There's something very clumsy about USian in my opinion.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 02:43:54 PM by Redwing »

marcel

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #122 on: April 11, 2013, 03:37:09 PM »
Fair enough. My experiences differ, but as this is all anecdata anyway it's worth exactly as much as you paid for it  :) This thread is the first time I've heard that some Canadians didn't identify as Americans.

We don't identify as Americans at all.  I think this is something that occurs in countries and continents outside Canada and the US. Most know Canada and the US are different countries, but they don't realize the cultures and identities are so different.   When I have been overseas, many times I will be asked if I am American.  My response is, No, I am Canadian.  Some people respond it is the same thing, but I politely correct them.  Many others respond that they realize the difference, but don't realize the different cultural identity.
I think you are completely wrong about the bolded. I believe that in every country/continent, it is only people from outside the continent that refer to the continent instead of countries.

I do not think there is any difference between how Canadians feel about being identified as Americans (continent not country) and how Dutch (or people in other European countries) feel about being identified as Europeans.
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WillyNilly

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #123 on: April 11, 2013, 04:23:58 PM »
well... I know many people in the US will refer to people as "European", or "African", "South American" or "Asian" not necessarily as natives of the individual countries the person is from. Some of the more... well known lets say (I'm not sure the right classification, maybe 'popular with Americans as vacation destination') countries like France, Italy, Spain, England and Ireland might be mentioned specifically but someone from say Hungary, or Montenegro, or Belarus? Most Americans I think would just describe that person as being "European".

So in that light I see no reason why Canadians and Mexicans wouldn't be considered North Americans, or even just plain Americans.

Hmmmmm

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #124 on: April 11, 2013, 04:28:30 PM »
Fair enough. My experiences differ, but as this is all anecdata anyway it's worth exactly as much as you paid for it  :) This thread is the first time I've heard that some Canadians didn't identify as Americans.

We don't identify as Americans at all.  I think this is something that occurs in countries and continents outside Canada and the US. Most know Canada and the US are different countries, but they don't realize the cultures and identities are so different.   When I have been overseas, many times I will be asked if I am American.  My response is, No, I am Canadian.  Some people respond it is the same thing, but I politely correct them.  Many others respond that they realize the difference, but don't realize the different cultural identity.
I think you are completely wrong about the bolded. I believe that in every country/continent, it is only people from outside the continent that refer to the continent instead of countries.

I do not think there is any difference between how Canadians feel about being identified as Americans (continent not country) and how Dutch (or people in other European countries) feel about being identified as Europeans.
I work with a lot of people in the UK. I've yet to meet one who self identifies as European. And I used to love to pick on a Scottish friend and call him European. It created a stronger reaction than calling our Puerto Rican friend American.

zinzin

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #125 on: April 11, 2013, 04:40:07 PM »
Fair enough. My experiences differ, but as this is all anecdata anyway it's worth exactly as much as you paid for it  :) This thread is the first time I've heard that some Canadians didn't identify as Americans.

Maria, I'm wondering - is that when you're speaking Danish with them? Because it sounds like English and Danish use very different terminology here.

I've never heard of Canadians choosing to identify themselves as Americans when travelling. In fact, there are all sorts of stories (mostly, I hope, urban legends) that we get better treatment if we make it clear we're Canadian.

Ohhh!! I missed that Maria is speaking a different language.  Yes, I agree with Twik.  Different language and use of terminology.

Well, it's definitely much more common in Danish, but no - this has been when speaking (or typing) in English. My first introduction to USians was on a mailing list for L.M. Montgomery where a large part of the members were from Canada. You're right that they didn't want to be mistaken for people from the US, but the general consensus there, at the time, was that Americans was an expected way of referring to people living on the land masses between the Atlantic and the Pacific.

I actually haven't yet met any Canadians who spoke Danish.

I can only imagine they were pulling your leg because being Canadian, lived there most of my life there, met other Canadians while traveling around the world - I've never met a Canadian who called themselves American, except one instance where they were being deliberately messing with an American. I suspect they were, as they say "having a laugh".

I have personally only ever seen USian online.

zinzin

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #126 on: April 11, 2013, 04:41:05 PM »
well... I know many people in the US will refer to people as "European", or "African", "South American" or "Asian" not necessarily as natives of the individual countries the person is from. Some of the more... well known lets say (I'm not sure the right classification, maybe 'popular with Americans as vacation destination') countries like France, Italy, Spain, England and Ireland might be mentioned specifically but someone from say Hungary, or Montenegro, or Belarus? Most Americans I think would just describe that person as being "European".

So in that light I see no reason why Canadians and Mexicans wouldn't be considered North Americans, or even just plain Americans.

Because America, in addition to being part of a continent name, is also part of a country name. That's why it's not analogous to Europe.

jaxsue

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #127 on: April 11, 2013, 04:48:10 PM »
Fair enough. My experiences differ, but as this is all anecdata anyway it's worth exactly as much as you paid for it  :) This thread is the first time I've heard that some Canadians didn't identify as Americans.

I'm Canadian; I've never met a Canadian that does identify as American, unless they are US citizens, living here.

And I would be very quick to correct anyone who called me American.  Especially when travelling overseas, which I may get a chance to do next year.

Friends of mine have lived in California for almost 15 years.  They still identify as Canadian.

I have lived in the US for 10 years.  I am Canadian and always will be.  I haven't taken US citizenship and don't have plans to do so.  I may change my mind, but at this time, I am happy with my status quo.

My parents came to the US from Ontario in 1954. They never changed their status.  :)

jaxsue

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #128 on: April 11, 2013, 04:50:33 PM »
Fair enough. My experiences differ, but as this is all anecdata anyway it's worth exactly as much as you paid for it  :) This thread is the first time I've heard that some Canadians didn't identify as Americans.

Maria, I'm wondering - is that when you're speaking Danish with them? Because it sounds like English and Danish use very different terminology here.

I've never heard of Canadians choosing to identify themselves as Americans when travelling. In fact, there are all sorts of stories (mostly, I hope, urban legends) that we get better treatment if we make it clear we're Canadian.

When I visited N. Ireland in 2005, I made no attempt to hide the fact that I was American (I behaved well, FTR). However, being around that particular Irish dialect brought out the Canadian in me (I have duo-citizenship), and people kept asking what part of Canada I was from! It was not intentional.  :D

WillyNilly

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #129 on: April 11, 2013, 05:01:07 PM »
well... I know many people in the US will refer to people as "European", or "African", "South American" or "Asian" not necessarily as natives of the individual countries the person is from. Some of the more... well known lets say (I'm not sure the right classification, maybe 'popular with Americans as vacation destination') countries like France, Italy, Spain, England and Ireland might be mentioned specifically but someone from say Hungary, or Montenegro, or Belarus? Most Americans I think would just describe that person as being "European".

So in that light I see no reason why Canadians and Mexicans wouldn't be considered North Americans, or even just plain Americans.

Because America, in addition to being part of a continent name, is also part of a country name. That's why it's not analogous to Europe.

I'm just saying, I totally think its justified from someone from another continent thinking of all people from the American continent as one grouping. Sure they know "American" might mean various specific countries, just like European would mean various countries, or Asian would. I don't really see how anyone can contain the usage of a word - if people are going to say it, they are going to say it. And so long as any of us also groups several countries under one heading, none of us should get to dictate its ok to do to others but not have done to us. Obviously it would be such a broad grouping it would loose much clarity, but its not an incorrect term.


katycoo

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #130 on: April 11, 2013, 05:03:43 PM »
I just have a question for people who say I am an American, not a USian. Will youi at least recognize the fact that a person from Guatemala is just as much an American as you are? Because that erson is, and that is the problem with the word American for a person from the USA, there is no word left to indicate a person from America in general, that does not confuse.

I spend some time on a city that called itself an all American city, and aal I could think everytime I saw that was: Duh, off course it is, it is a city in America. Buenos Aires is an all American city as well, and so is Rio de Janeiro or Quebec No city in America is more American then anbother city in America.

Internationally speaing, you're American if you're from the USA.  If you're from one of the other countries on the same continent, you're from "The Americas".

There are some sets of countries that people (for whatever reason - primarily similarity of language & accent), mentally group together, i.e. USA & Canada and New Zealand and Australia. This means that someone outside those countries/continent may describe something as American, when they actually mean Canadian, or Australian, when they actually mean New Zealand. To someone inside those countries that might seem bizarre or offensive, but to an outsider, it's easily done, although no offence is intended. By using the term USian, it removes the mental ambiguity from American, which could mean Canadian or American (USA). 

We'll claim anything good that NZ has/does anyway so it's mostly our fault for purpetuating the myth.

Optimoose Prime

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #131 on: April 11, 2013, 05:24:05 PM »
Just talked with my Danish son. ( Exchange student from last year.)  He said people from the US are Americans or Amerikaner.  From other countries are referred to by their country, ie Kanadier.  He said he might use Syd Amerikaner for someone from South America but that's about it.

Onyx_TKD

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #132 on: April 11, 2013, 08:54:19 PM »
well... I know many people in the US will refer to people as "European", or "African", "South American" or "Asian" not necessarily as natives of the individual countries the person is from. Some of the more... well known lets say (I'm not sure the right classification, maybe 'popular with Americans as vacation destination') countries like France, Italy, Spain, England and Ireland might be mentioned specifically but someone from say Hungary, or Montenegro, or Belarus? Most Americans I think would just describe that person as being "European".

So in that light I see no reason why Canadians and Mexicans wouldn't be considered North Americans, or even just plain Americans.

I'm curious, would you refer to someone from a country in Europe or Asia as "Eurasian"? To me, using "American" for anyone from North or South America is analogous to using "Eurasian" for anyone from Europe or Asia. "Eurasian" is a valid word, and I'm sure there are some contexts where it is useful, but I don't recall ever hearing it used in a normal conversation. I hear "European" and "Asian" all the time, as well as words for inhabitants of individual European and Asian countries, but never "Eurasian." I can't think of a time I needed to refer to the combined population of Europe and Asia, but if I did, I would say "Europeans and Asians."

Similarly, "North American" and "South American" make perfect sense to me as ways to refer to the populations of those continents. But I can't really think of a reason I'd need a single term to encompass everyone in the Americas*. Once the term encompasses the inhabitants of an entire hemisphere, it seems like it is so general that it ceases to be useful. I would say "North and South Americans" if I needed to refer to that population.

*As katycoo touched on, I don't consider North and South America to be a unified landmass of "America." The two continents would be "the Americas" plural. Likewise, as a South Carolinian, I refer to North and South Carolina collectively as "the Carolinas" (plural), not "Carolina" (singular)**. It's often convenient to drop a few syllables when referring to both of them, but IME they are referred in plural, because they are a set of two entities with similar names rather than a unified whole.

**With an exemption for the song "Carolina in the Morning" due to poetic license  ;). (Sorry about the footnotes on footnotes--I seem to be channeling a less-funny Terry Pratchett today.

selkiewoman

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #133 on: April 11, 2013, 09:12:21 PM »
I am only familiar with the term 'Eurasian' applied to a person of mixed European and Asian descent, and yes, I have heard it used in conversation.

katycoo

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #134 on: April 11, 2013, 09:13:51 PM »
I'm curious, would you refer to someone from a country in Europe or Asia as "Eurasian"? To me, using "American" for anyone from North or South America is analogous to using "Eurasian" for anyone from Europe or Asia. "Eurasian" is a valid word, and I'm sure there are some contexts where it is useful, but I don't recall ever hearing it used in a normal conversation. I hear "European" and "Asian" all the time, as well as words for inhabitants of individual European and Asian countries, but never "Eurasian." I can't think of a time I needed to refer to the combined population of Europe and Asia, but if I did, I would say "Europeans and Asians."

Eurasion is used to describe people of mixed asian and cauasian/European descent - is my understanding.