Author Topic: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread  (Read 55371 times)

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crella

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #15 on: April 09, 2013, 06:10:29 AM »
Re: USians

'USians' is in the Urban Dictionary as a written, not spoken, name for Americans. I read it instinctively because of the capitalization...if it weren't capitalized, I might have read it 'yuzians', but I guessed that the caps were to be read 'as is' 'U' 'S'-ians. I've only seen in once I think, on Reddit.

LadyDyani

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #16 on: April 09, 2013, 07:36:27 AM »
It was mentioned that Yank had negative connotations.  While it's true that it's derived from Yankee, for me, the term really started coming into its own with our soldiers abroad in WWII, so I have only good connotations with Yank.  Yankee, on the other hand, i almost never positive.  Two little letters, but so influential.

My experience has been the opposite.  The only time I've ever been called a Yank was in a derogatory manner, while traveling through some southern states.  Maybe it's a mid-western thing, but I've never heard the term around here.

As for USians, meh.  I don't have feelings toward it either way, which seems odd, as I usually get irritated at shorthand.

Reading the talk about Yankee Doodle Dandy, the first thought that popped into my head was "So that's the Gangnam Style song from back then, making fun of posers?"
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

Thipu1

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #17 on: April 09, 2013, 07:47:52 AM »
I'm reminded of the old definition of a Yankee.

To the rest of the world, a Yankee comes from the USA.

In the USA, a Yankee is someone from the north.

In the north, a Yankee is someone from New England.

In New England, a Yankee is a native of Vermont.

In Vermont, a Yankee is someone who eats pie for breakfast. 

Diane AKA Traska

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #18 on: April 09, 2013, 08:07:11 AM »
It was mentioned that Yank had negative connotations.  While it's true that it's derived from Yankee, for me, the term really started coming into its own with our soldiers abroad in WWII, so I have only good connotations with Yank.  Yankee, on the other hand, i almost never positive.  Two little letters, but so influential.

My experience has been the opposite.  The only time I've ever been called a Yank was in a derogatory manner, while traveling through some southern states.  Maybe it's a mid-western thing, but I've never heard the term around here.

As for USians, meh.  I don't have feelings toward it either way, which seems odd, as I usually get irritated at shorthand.

Reading the talk about Yankee Doodle Dandy, the first thought that popped into my head was "So that's the Gangnam Style song from back then, making fun of posers?"

Now that's odd.  I've never heard an American call another American a Yank.  A Yankee, yes, but not a Yank.
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LadyDyani

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #19 on: April 09, 2013, 08:10:34 AM »
Now that's odd.  I've never heard an American call another American a Yank.  A Yankee, yes, but not a Yank.

I believe the exact term used in the most memorable incident was "G**-D***-Yank".  There may have been an "ee" sound on the end, but I didn't hear it.  And I'm pretty sure it was said just loud enough for me to hear.
English doesn't borrow from other languages, it follows them down dark alleys and beats them up and searches their pockets for loose grammar.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #20 on: April 09, 2013, 08:30:20 AM »
When DH was in the Marines and stationed in California, we knew a LOT of folks who were from the south or Midwest.  I think DH and I were one of the few people we met who were from the east.   One of the guys in his company and the guy's wife were from Texas, as was one of their neighbors. 

Well MW and MW2 insisted on calling me a Yankee because I was from Maryland.  I kept saying "Maryland's south of the Mason-Dixon, I'm not a yankee." but that's mainly because growing up I always had the impression that "Yankee" meant someone from above the M-D, or a member of the NY baseball team.
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VorFemme

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #21 on: April 09, 2013, 08:56:23 AM »
I've only had neutral conotations with yank/yankee.  Especially as I really know the latter word from history class, and Yankee Doodle Dandy.  Who must've been insane, come to think of it...

Who else would think a feather in the hat was macaroni? :o

At the time the latest fashion in clothing was termed "the macaroni" (think "goth", "emo", or "greaser" for a comparable look with a specific name).  The "macaroni" types ate a newly fashionable dish at times - which is probably where the noodle got its name......

It was mentioned that Yank had negative connotations.  While it's true that it's derived from Yankee, for me, the term really started coming into its own with our soldiers abroad in WWII, so I have only good connotations with Yank.  Yankee, on the other hand, i almost never positive.  Two little letters, but so influential.

My experience has been the opposite.  The only time I've ever been called a Yank was in a derogatory manner, while traveling through some southern states.  Maybe it's a mid-western thing, but I've never heard the term around here.

As for USians, meh.  I don't have feelings toward it either way, which seems odd, as I usually get irritated at shorthand.

Reading the talk about Yankee Doodle Dandy, the first thought that popped into my head was "So that's the Gangnam Style song from back then, making fun of posers?"

LOL

That (bolded) pretty much nails it!
« Last Edit: April 09, 2013, 09:01:24 AM by VorFemme »
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snowdragon

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #22 on: April 09, 2013, 12:32:47 PM »
It was mentioned that Yank had negative connotations.  While it's true that it's derived from Yankee, for me, the term really started coming into its own with our soldiers abroad in WWII, so I have only good connotations with Yank.  Yankee, on the other hand, i almost never positive.  Two little letters, but so influential.

My experience has been the opposite.  The only time I've ever been called a Yank was in a derogatory manner, while traveling through some southern states.  Maybe it's a mid-western thing, but I've never heard the term around here.

As for USians, meh.  I don't have feelings toward it either way, which seems odd, as I usually get irritated at shorthand.

Reading the talk about Yankee Doodle Dandy, the first thought that popped into my head was "So that's the Gangnam Style song from back then, making fun of posers?"


Now that's odd.  I've never heard an American call another American a Yank.  A Yankee, yes, but not a Yank.



I have. Usually, while traveling for concerts in Canada. There used to be a band from Toronto that had a member who was very, vocal about being anti American and some of the fans took umbrage.   Even in conversation with each other a certain section of the fans took to calling themselves and their countrymen "Yanks" - you could hear the sarcasm dripping from their voices when they'd say " Tell a Yank about X the referendum, what's that about?" or "I'm just a Yank - who is X member of Parliament that they are interviewing on TV?" or some such. Or "Exactly why does Z band member hate Yanks so much?"  - in a certain faction of the fans, it became a thing to mock his hatred of us openly.
  I heard it to a much, much lesser extent in NS, Canada- but then it was all in fun. :)

Hazmat

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #23 on: April 09, 2013, 02:04:28 PM »
The USian discussion has been interestly.  About 10 years ago was the first time I learned some citizens of countries in North and South American countries were irritated or offended by US citizens referring to themselves as Americans.  It immediately made sense to me so I stopped and when asked would say I was from the US or from the States.

About a year ago my teen son asked why I did that and I explained. He said he thought it silly.  Amercian's were called Americans while still a colony.  We didnt' name outselves that. Also, the USofA is the only country with America in their name so why not continue to use the long standing globally accepted terminology of an American can be a citizen of the US.  He asked me if I'd ever met a Argentenian or a Chilean who referred to themselves as an American or even a S. American and I had to admit that no. He also asked me how I expected African Americans to refer to themselves, African "from the States".  He also pointed out that if we were to change the definition of American to just generalized continent we'd really mess up the term Mexican American.  With the revised American definition, Mexican American would mean a person from Mexico living on the continent of America, i.e. most Mexican citizens. 

After that discussion, I decided to drop the global political correctness and have gone back to referring to myself as an American... but of course being 4th generation I'm just as likely to say I'm a Texan.

And speaking on generation tracking, what other states do people of other states track the number of generations their families have lived that specific State? Or for that matter, do Canadians? The only other states I've ever heard anyone mention it was in California and it was friend who's family still owned real estate from a family Mexican Land Grant and Louisiana Cajuns will talk about when their family's arrived.
Here's my view on the subject.  From the "Phrases/sayings you hate" thread.

USian.

I am many things: a Hoosier, a Disabled Combat Veteran, an American.  But my license plates don't read "Disabled USian Veteran", they read "Disabled American Veteran".  As an American and a Veteran, I find this insulting.  I'm not saying it's meant to be insulting, far from it.  I think most (if not all) of the posters who use the term (The Transatlantic Knowledge Thread is one example) are using it respectfully.  Other Americans, other Veterans, might not mind it at all.  I do.  I get defensive, and unfortunately (and unfairly) affects my view of what the poster has to say.

The discussion got pretty heated, and I had to step away from the thread.

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marcel

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #24 on: April 09, 2013, 02:32:59 PM »
I just have a question for people who say I am an American, not a USian. Will youi at least recognize the fact that a person from Guatemala is just as much an American as you are? Because that erson is, and that is the problem with the word American for a person from the USA, there is no word left to indicate a person from America in general, that does not confuse.


I spend some time on a city that called itself an all American city, and aal I could think everytime I saw that was: Duh, off course it is, it is a city in America. Buenos Aires is an all American city as well, and so is Rio de Janeiro or Quebec No city in America is more American then anbother city in America.


I really do not understand how some people can be insulted by the word USAian or USian. You are a citizen of the USA, except when you feel some kind of shame for your country (and for the people who feel insulted it seems to be the opposite) I do not see how it is insulting to recognize that a person is a citizen of a certain country. I would say that it is the exact opposite of insulting, it is a recognition of your country.


@ Hazmat, I assume you served in the US army/navy/air force, not in the American army/navy/air force.




edited spelling error, too much time posting on another site:)
« Last Edit: April 10, 2013, 05:22:02 AM by marcel »
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Cami

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #25 on: April 09, 2013, 02:42:59 PM »
I just have a question for people who say I am an American, not a USian. Will youi at least recognize the fact that a person from Guatemala is just as much an American as you are? Because that erson is, and that is the problem with the word American for a person from the USA, there is no word left to indicate a person from America in general, that does not confuse.


I spend some time on a city that called itself an all American city, and aal I could think everytime I saw that was: Duh, off course it is, it is a city in America. Buenos Aires is an all American city as well, and so is Rio de Janeiro or Quebec No city in America is more American then anbother city in America.


I really do not understand how some people can be insulted by the word USAian or USian. You are a citizen of the USA, except when you feel some kind of shame for your country (and for the people who feel insulted it seems to be the opposite) I do not see how it is insulting to recognize that a person is a citizen of a certain country. I would say that it is the exact opposite of insulting, it is a recognition of your country.


@ Hazmat, I assume you surfed in the US army/navy/air force, not in the American army/navy/air force.
I've never ever heard of someone from Canada or south of the US border refer to themselves as an American. In fact, I have a friend who is from Costa Rica and they all refer to the day they got their citizenship as "the day we became American."

Hmmmmm

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #26 on: April 09, 2013, 02:49:26 PM »
I just have a question for people who say I am an American, not a USian. Will youi at least recognize the fact that a person from Guatemala is just as much an American as you are? Because that erson is, and that is the problem with the word American for a person from the USA, there is no word left to indicate a person from America in general, that does not confuse.


I spend some time on a city that called itself an all American city, and aal I could think everytime I saw that was: Duh, off course it is, it is a city in America. Buenos Aires is an all American city as well, and so is Rio de Janeiro or Quebec No city in America is more American then anbother city in America.


I really do not understand how some people can be insulted by the word USAian or USian. You are a citizen of the USA, except when you feel some kind of shame for your country (and for the people who feel insulted it seems to be the opposite) I do not see how it is insulting to recognize that a person is a citizen of a certain country. I would say that it is the exact opposite of insulting, it is a recognition of your country.


@ Hazmat, I assume you surfed in the US army/navy/air force, not in the American army/navy/air force.

I can't see a huge need for anyone to say I'm American to indicate they are from the Western Hemisphere. As I said in my post, I've never had a Chilean, Guatamalean, Mexican, or Argentinian say I'm American. (For that matter, I can't imagine a Frenchman saying he was European instead of French.)  Even if someone decided they didn't want to indicate their country, I think the majority would either say they were North American or South American or Central American. The non-US definition of American includes an entire hemisphere.

I not offended by the term USian. I just don't agree anymore with the idea that US citizens are trouncing on other countries rights by continuing to use a term to describe citizens of the United States of America. As my teen son pointed out, we are the only country with the word in our name. It was used to identify us when we were still a colony.

There are many words that have dual definitions and most people are able to understand the appropriate meaning by how it is used in context.

Because the word American has had a long standing (over 200 years) definition to indentify citizens of the USofA, when the majority of us use it, is is recognizing our country.

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #27 on: April 09, 2013, 04:17:59 PM »

@ Hazmat, I assume you surfed in the US army/navy/air force, not in the American army/navy/air force.
It is one and the same.  Either is correct.
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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #28 on: April 09, 2013, 05:59:50 PM »
I've only had neutral conotations with yank/yankee.  Especially as I really know the latter word from history class, and Yankee Doodle Dandy.  Who must've been insane, come to think of it...

Who else would think a feather in the hat was macaroni? :o

Macaroni is an English term for a fop or dandy.

selkiewoman

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Re: File under Miscellaneous: Topics That Don't Deserve A Whole Thread
« Reply #29 on: April 09, 2013, 07:55:35 PM »
Having inadvertantly started a more lively discussion than I anticipated, I will say that I consider it a facet of etiquette not to take offense where none is intended.  I am frequently referred to as a 'Brit'.  Technically correct, I suppose, but that is not how I selfidentify.  If asked, I identify my nationality as "Scottish".  I no more think of myself as a Brit than a lady from Georgia would recognise herself as a Yank.  We may certainly correct, but we should not be offended where there is no intent to insult.

BTW, the designation "Yank" is still commonly used in the UK to denote a person fron the US.  Sometimes it's merely descriptive, sometimes it could be taken as insulting - it depends on the users opinions of the United States.