General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

Ah! I didn't meant that at all!

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BuffaloFang:
So someone asked me to look at a Word document that kept freezing and crashing.  Besides it being a rather large document, I noticed a ton of superfluous styles, so I said I could try to clean up the stylesheet a bit to see if that would help.

Next thing I know, the person asking me for help is sending a mass email saying I was fixing the stability issues, and that whoever set up the document probably needed MS Word training, etc.

I didn't mean that at all! I just thought I'd try something to see if it'd help.  Whoever set up the document actually seems to have a very good grasp on Word, and it looks like things just got muddled a bit as it went through several hands.

So should I send a corrective email to this person?  To everyone? Or should I just keep quiet?  I know the person was trying to compliment me, sort of, so I feel bad correcting them, but I also don't want whoever set up the document to be on the line for something that isn't their fault, and may or may not even be a problem.

Hmmmmm:
If you were copied on the email, then yes I would send a note saying "That is not what was said." and then explain your plan of action.

sweetonsno:

--- Quote from: Hmmmmm on April 09, 2013, 05:24:04 PM ---If you were copied on the email, then yes I would send a note saying "That is not what was said." and then explain your plan of action.

--- End quote ---

I agree. If you weren't copied on the email and just heard about it through the grapevine, I'd send an email clarifying what you said. I'm not sure whether it should go to the person who you helped or the original author's supervisor (or both), but your phrasing is pretty good.

"It wasn't my intention to say or imply that X needed Word training. I just adjusted some things on the style sheet to see if it would help. X seems to have a very good grasp on Word, and it looks like things just got muddled a bit as the document went through several hands."

Maybe you could send it to both and add a "I'm glad I was able to help you" when you email the person who asked for your help.

LazyDaisy:
If someone asks you about it directly, you can clarify you didn't say that, but please for the love of all that is holy, please don't reply all to the email. I say this as someone who gets emails on subjects I care nothing about, and then the rely all emails to follow.

Mostly, I would remain silent. Let the email reflect on the sender. Did she/he word the email exactly like you did? If I read it the way you wrote it -- someone was fixing the issue and then a snark about whoever set it up needing training -- I wouldn't necessarily think you said that exact quote; I would assume it was a statement by the email author.

reflection5:

--- Quote from: Hmmmmm on April 09, 2013, 05:24:04 PM ---If you were copied on the email, then yes I would send a note saying "That is not what was said." and then explain your plan of action.

--- End quote ---

Yes, I agree.

The person who asked for your help had no business sending that email.  What on earth was her motivation?  ??? I might ask her (in person, not email) why she did it, and if you were misquoted (about saying someone needed MS training) ask why she made that comment.  It kind of looks like she was trying to cover herself (her own lack of skills) and stir something up.  I'd be very careful when interacting with her.

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