Author Topic: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.  (Read 5732 times)

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Margo

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #30 on: April 10, 2013, 03:39:56 PM »
I also dislike the smell of ripe/overripe banana (I can, and do, eat them if they are slightly under-ripe)

I work in two different offices and on days I'm not in office A, a colleague uses my office. She is very fond of bananas and eats one most days. I explained the situation and asked her if she would please but the skins into the kitchen bin rather than the one in our room. (our bins are not emptied every days)

In your case, I's simply explain to your boss - for most people, delaying 3-10 before eating something (or delaying a meeting by 5 minutes to eat first) would not be an issue.

If she is not willing to compromise then the suggestion to keep a strongly scented lip salve, or something such as Vicks or Olbas Oil so you can mask the scent is a good one.

Sophia

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #31 on: April 10, 2013, 03:50:24 PM »
You would hate my workplace.  A couple of months ago they started to get weekly fruit deliveries for the employees.  Bananas are very popular.  We only have about 30 people in the office, and the day it reaches that perfect ripeness I've seen 20 bananas disappear in a day.

jpcher

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #32 on: April 10, 2013, 06:08:02 PM »
Are we really talking about bananas?

Yup, really talking about bananas. ;)



Bananas are not an uncommon allergen and it is very common for one to find the smell of an allergen to be absolutely nauseating.  OP, if you haven't, you may want to get tested.  I know 3 people with this allergy, all of them found out because the smell of bananas is nauseating to them - for two of them, the allergy is anaphylactic (the third person 'just' gets hives).

Wow, I never realized that just the smell alone could cause an allergic reaction. I've never had a reaction except for slight nausea. (Maybe that's because I run away before any reaction can set in  ;))


Are you allergic to ragweed or similar plants?

When bananas get ripe, they release a chemical similar to ragweed. Often those with ragweed allergies find that RIPE bananas not only can cause them to have an allergic reaction, but also that RIPE bananas smell noxious to them.

Another interesting fact. ;D . . . no, I'm not allergic to ragweed.



The next time I see Boss eating a banana I will politely mention my aversion. I can definitely see that trying to put up with the smell the way I have been might come across in the wrong way (possible BO or non-interest in the conversation.)

Thanks for setting me straight.


Oh, and to those mention lip balm or somesuch thing to cover the smell, I'll try that, if she refuses to stop eating bananas around me.

Just Lori

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #33 on: April 10, 2013, 08:27:36 PM »
First of all, I really expected this to be a question about someone who ate too many beans the night before.

I agree with all the PP who say you should just be upfront about it.  Own it as your problem, and don't expect anyone to quit eating bananas.  Just ask them to be understanding when you move away from the scent.

FWIW, I have an equal reaction to seafood, especially shrimp.  If someone is frying shrimp, I have to go somewhere else.  I figure my body is trying to warn me away from seafood for some reason.  I do not, however, have an aversion to chocolate.  Obviously my body welcomes good chocolate, and I should listen to my body.

pinkyblue

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #34 on: April 10, 2013, 11:16:48 PM »
How reassuring to discover how many other people find the smell of bananas revolting!

Add me to this list! I thought I was the only one.  I can't stand even the least bit of banana-related smell - I find it  overwhelming and nauseating, and nothing I've employed by way of countermeasures makes any dfference.  My co-workers have been wonderfully understanding in terms of taking their banana remains to the kitchen bin rather than just dumping them in their cubicles' bins where they smell up the place all day and into the next (at least, for me - it seems to linger).  They've even made a joke out of it, which is cool.  :)   

I'm intrigued by a previous post (sorry, forget which one) that mentioned not having this sensitivity until about age 10 or so.  I'm told I had no problem with bananas until I was about 8 or 9, at which time I suddenly and definitively could not stand any contact with them, let alone eating them.  I'd really like to know the reason behind such a sudden and major shift like that. 

I agree that it would be best to mention the sensitivity/aversion openly and thus avoid any misinterpretation that might come about due to being more oblique/subtle.   

leaf_eater

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #35 on: April 11, 2013, 12:30:29 AM »
I loooathe bananas. 

I see what you did there. :) One of my favorite POTA lines.

LadyDyani

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #36 on: April 11, 2013, 01:20:45 PM »
Oranges.  When I was about 10, I spent an eight hour car ride with my mom and stepdad in the front seat, and my sister next to me. It was a hot and rainy July, which means extreme humidity and windows rolled up. My mom and stepdad were chain smokers. Sis ate two or three oranges over the eight hour ride, but since we drove straight through, the rinds were in a bag, right there next to me.  There was no getting away from the smell.  The only time I got out of the car over the eight hours was when they pulled over for me to be sick.

To this day I can't stand the smell.  No orange cleaners, no orange juice, nothing.  My DD loves oranges, so she peels them, takes the rinds out to the dumpster, then uses lemon cleaner on the counter.  DD loves her momma.  :-)  Hubby uses this orange scented hand cleaner when he works on cars, he keeps it in the garage, and he washes the rags so I don't have to deal with it.  He loves me too.  :-)
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sunnygirl

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #37 on: April 12, 2013, 09:15:21 AM »
Ever since I was born I've had a problem with the smell of cucumber - when I was a kid it genuinely made me throw up; now I can sort of handle it but if I get a proper whiff it makes me gag. My friends and family know about it and are fine with accommodating it. With other people, I either try to discreetly move away, or just very politely say, "I'm sorry but I have this unusual problem..." People are understanding, I feel, if it's presented in the right way.

I agree than bananas have a strong smell (to me).

Incidentally, a fun fact I learned in my undergrad degree - bell peppers have a certain compound (phenylthiocarbamide) which is incredibly bitter smelling and tasting. Green peppers have the most and red the least. But the ability to smell/taste this compound is genetic - you either have the gene to be able to identify it, or you don't. (Similar to the famous 'bitter almond' smell of cyanide - the ability to smell it is a recessive genetic trait, so unlike bell peppers the majority of people actually can't smell it.) So that's why a lot of people really can't stand green peppers, and think they taste/smell really strong, while a lot of other people love them think they don't have much of a smell/taste. I can't even walk past loose green peppers in the supermarket.

Sorry if that's too off-topic or if you already knew that!

Cami

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #38 on: April 12, 2013, 09:21:19 AM »
Ever since I was born I've had a problem with the smell of cucumber - when I was a kid it genuinely made me throw up; now I can sort of handle it but if I get a proper whiff it makes me gag. My friends and family know about it and are fine with accommodating it. With other people, I either try to discreetly move away, or just very politely say, "I'm sorry but I have this unusual problem..." People are understanding, I feel, if it's presented in the right way.

I agree than bananas have a strong smell (to me).

Incidentally, a fun fact I learned in my undergrad degree - bell peppers have a certain compound (phenylthiocarbamide) which is incredibly bitter smelling and tasting. Green peppers have the most and red the least. But the ability to smell/taste this compound is genetic - you either have the gene to be able to identify it, or you don't. (Similar to the famous 'bitter almond' smell of cyanide - the ability to smell it is a recessive genetic trait, so unlike bell peppers the majority of people actually can't smell it.) So that's why a lot of people really can't stand green peppers, and think they taste/smell really strong, while a lot of other people love them think they don't have much of a smell/taste. I can't even walk past loose green peppers in the supermarket.

Sorry if that's too off-topic or if you already knew that!
Thanks for that info! Just yesterday I was having a conversation with people about peppers and how some of us like red, but not green peppers.

camlan

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #39 on: April 12, 2013, 10:04:19 AM »
I love bananas and eat one almost every day. But even I think the banana peel gets a bit smelly after the banana is gone. That's why one of the reasons I don't consider them an office-friendly food, because the smell is sort of cloying and it lingers. (The other is that they get so bruised in a lunch bag.)

So, yeah, just tell your boss that the smell really bothers you and ask nicely if he could not eat them around you.
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Thipu1

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #40 on: April 12, 2013, 10:33:11 AM »
There can also be problems with cilantro. 

I like it in small doses but, in some dim sum dishes, the smell immediately jumps from 'tasty' to 'soap'.  It turns me right off. 

MariaE

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Re: Unappealing smells . . . not sure if I handled this correctly.
« Reply #41 on: April 12, 2013, 10:36:45 AM »
I'm intrigued by a previous post (sorry, forget which one) that mentioned not having this sensitivity until about age 10 or so.  I'm told I had no problem with bananas until I was about 8 or 9, at which time I suddenly and definitively could not stand any contact with them, let alone eating them.  I'd really like to know the reason behind such a sudden and major shift like that. 

That was me :) I wonder if it may have been a hormone thing. I entered puberty quite early and if my memory serves me right it would coincide with that.
 
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