General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

Holding a Meeting Slot

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Sparkle Star:
This is something I've wondered before but, as it seems to happen quite a lot at the moment, it's prompted me to ask - what's the etiquette when it comes to holding open a meeting slot that someone has suggested and then doesn't confirm?

An example:
On Monday, a client requested a meeting next week, giving three days/times that worked for her - Monday before 1pm, Tuesday before 11am and Thursday after 1pm.

Only one of those fits with my schedule. I responded saying so and asked her to confirm with a venue, as that would also affect the meeting time. Two days later and I've heard nothing - no response so far to my email or voicemail.

In the meantime, somebody else has requested a meeting within the same timeslot and I've also been asked to participate in a conference call involving 3 other people. What does etiquette say I should do? Should I decline other appointments until I've heard back from Client A? The conference call is difficult to rearrange as it relies on four people being free at the same time - which technically I am, as Client A hasn't come back to me. But if I agree to the call and then she wants to meet during a time I'd indicated I'd be available, that wouldn't be good either....

What do you guys think, or what's the generally accepted behaviour?

Awestruck Shmuck:
If it was a matter of *getting*/doing business, I would probably be more lenient - but if it's a more routine matter, I would call - maybe twice, and leave messages. Then I would send an email explaining that you had to schedule other meetings.

Maybe give her a few hours to respond, then let her know that for this week, you will now only be available at...2pm Thursday - and that you could hold *that spot* open for her until Thursday morning.

I think if she's not communicating with you, the etiquette is a moot point, your business (or your bosses/companies business) could suffer more from delaying these other meetings.

Hmmmmm:
Depending on the relationship of with your client, I'd send her a note asking her to confirm the meeting. Explain you have another meeting that someone is trying to schedule for the same time.  She may think the meeting is already confirmed and just last minute logistics need to be worked out. 

"Hi, Client. I wanted to confirm our Thursday meeting. My schedule is getting booked up fast this week. Would you let me know if we are still on?" 

If you don't hear back, send another note this afternoon saying. "I've had to schedule another meeting for Thursday. Would you let me know times that work for you next week?"

bopper:
Turn this around.  You want to meet with someone and you said I can meet on A, B or C.  They say B and please send information.  Would you think at that point it is still up in the air?  Or would you think that you will get back to them once you have booked a meeting room?

PastryGoddess:

--- Quote from: bopper on April 10, 2013, 09:01:51 AM ---Turn this around.  You want to meet with someone and you said I can meet on A, B or C.  They say B and please send information.  Would you think at that point it is still up in the air?  Or would you think that you will get back to them once you have booked a meeting room?

--- End quote ---

I don't think it matters.  You confirm that you have received their request and will be back in touch with them with more details.  I mean a simple "Great, thanks for confirming a date.  Not sure of the venue, but I'll let you know ASAP" takes all of 2 minutes to type and send.  It lets the person know you are both confirmed for that date and that you'll be in touch with more info.

I think it's kind of rude to leave people hanging.

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