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  • December 05, 2016, 04:45:24 AM

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Author Topic: No, I won't be your carrier  (Read 4081 times)

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Aquamarine

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #45 on: December 03, 2016, 11:52:32 AM »
These people use "magical thinking", acting as though what they're asking takes up no space or has any weight.  They just don't stop and critically work it all out in their heads, they are focused instead on the items they want to get their hands on.  Just keep saying no, that you travel carryon only.  If they press, excuse yourself and walk away.  Repeat as needed.  If they won't stop nagging, you can at least stop listening.
Always be polite, even to nasty people. Not because they are nice, but because you are.

Amanita

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #46 on: December 03, 2016, 03:14:55 PM »
Depending on the item in question (something small and inexpensive), I wouldn't think it inherently unreasonable to ask somebody who's traveling to bring something back, just as long as you're prepared to accept the answer. A friend of mine is in Chicago at the moment, and I asked him to take some skyscraper pics for me. But for various reasons he hasn't gotten the chance to go downtown so far (staying with a friend and attending a con near the airport), so I'm not going to get upset with him.

In your case (tight connections and no bag space), I don't think you're being mean or unreasonable to refuse. The problem is that the person asking won't take no for an answer and keeps arguing.

blarg314

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #47 on: December 03, 2016, 06:30:36 PM »

Just a comment on checking bags -

For international flights, it's typical to have to pick up your bags when you transfer in a new country, even on the same airline, because you have to clear customs upon entry into the country. In the US, you have to do this even for transfer flights where the only part of the US you visit in the airport.   

So it's not the fee that's necessarily the issue, but the additional time it takes to wait for your bags between immigration and customs, find out where to drop them off again, walk there, and wait in line to do that, then get to your gate.  That can be enough to push a tight connection into missing a plane.

artk2002

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #48 on: Yesterday at 10:22:11 AM »
I'm going to go against the majority on the sister issue. In my family when we'd travel to visit family in a different country, it was standard to ask what they'd like us to bring to them.

If I were you with your sister I would say "I'm not checking my bags because I have tight connections with different airlines. I'm happy to try and check one through for you if you want to pay the checked bag fee. I understand lots of the fear of lost bags, but in reality it's really less than 2% of all bags get misrouted.

I agree with the other posters who pointed out, it's not the checked bag fee that OP seems concerned about in this particular situation. Because they aren't connected flights, OP would have to go to baggage claim herself, wait for the item (that always seems to take longer than I anticipate!), then go back and check the bag with the new airline and go through security once again. The only way I would do this is if my layover was a few hours, and even then it seems like a lot of hassle. A hold-up at any one of those steps would mean a missed flight.

If the flights were connecting flights, I would agree with you.

I've checked luggage through many times when traveling overseas on different airlines using separately purchased tickets. For example last May I used a United ticket using airline miles from Houston to Washington and then a purchased ticket to Paris on British Airways. I checked the bags through in Houston and they arrived Paris on my flight. On our way back, we went from Dublin(Aer Lingus) to Amsterdam to Houston(Lufthansa)... again not connecting flights as we actually did a full day stop in Amersterdam so did 10 hour layover. Four checked bags arrived with us.

That's been my experience. The only caveat is that I have had luggage delayed when the flights were too close together. I was going to Toronto from San Francisco via Los Angeles (go figure) and the flight from SFO to LAX was United while the flight from LAX to TOR was Air Canada. The two gates are on opposite sides of LAX and *I* barely made it. My luggage took an additional two days. (That's when I learned to keep underwear, pyjamas and a toothbrush in my carry on.) I've had that happen with the same airline, too. British Airways from Los Angeles to Frankfurt via London Heathrow.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.

Darcy

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #49 on: Yesterday at 05:36:51 PM »
I have my carry-on packing to a fine art.  :-*

I don't think there's a problem in pointing out that you can order anything online nowadays, and it'll probably arrive faster, cheaper, and less beaten-up.

Sara Crewe

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #50 on: Yesterday at 08:38:44 PM »

Just a comment on checking bags -

For international flights, it's typical to have to pick up your bags when you transfer in a new country, even on the same airline, because you have to clear customs upon entry into the country. In the US, you have to do this even for transfer flights where the only part of the US you visit in the airport.   

So it's not the fee that's necessarily the issue, but the additional time it takes to wait for your bags between immigration and customs, find out where to drop them off again, walk there, and wait in line to do that, then get to your gate.  That can be enough to push a tight connection into missing a plane.

Actually, I have never had to do this, even in the US where you have to clear immigration even if you are only transiting.  I've transferred planes (on one ticket) in LA, Hong Kong, Dubai and Sydney and not collected my bags until I did customs in my destination country.

Of course, if you are changing airlines, as OP is, the rules are different.

I'm willing to pay extra to hand in my suitcases in airport 1 and get them back in airport 4, maybe the OP's sister always does the same and it never occurred to her this could be an issue (though she needed to stop pushing when told 'no').

MariaE

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #51 on: Yesterday at 11:50:50 PM »

Just a comment on checking bags -

For international flights, it's typical to have to pick up your bags when you transfer in a new country, even on the same airline, because you have to clear customs upon entry into the country. In the US, you have to do this even for transfer flights where the only part of the US you visit in the airport.   

So it's not the fee that's necessarily the issue, but the additional time it takes to wait for your bags between immigration and customs, find out where to drop them off again, walk there, and wait in line to do that, then get to your gate.  That can be enough to push a tight connection into missing a plane.

I've from international with transfers in other countries tons of times and never had to do this - even when changing airlines.

The only exception is if you're changing from an international to a domestic flight - then they'll sometimes require you to do it even with the same airline, as the end airport might not be set up to handle customs. I've still never had to do it, but I think that's more a matter of chance than anything else - my sister has experienced it a few times.
 
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iridaceae

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #52 on: Today at 12:07:48 AM »
The U.S. does not recognize transit (we don't even do transit visas)  so I don't know how you would have been able to avoid picking up your luggage after immigration and then handing back over, Sara Crewe. If it's on one ticket after you clear customs you hand your bags over to waiting employees then continue on to security.
Nothing to see here.

MariaE

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #53 on: Today at 02:34:49 AM »
The U.S. does not recognize transit (we don't even do transit visas)  so I don't know how you would have been able to avoid picking up your luggage after immigration and then handing back over, Sara Crewe. If it's on one ticket after you clear customs you hand your bags over to waiting employees then continue on to security.

That must be a fairly new thing. I've done transit in the US several times (no visa needed, as we weren't allowed to leave the transit lounge), and we definitely didn't have to get our luggage. But again, that was from one international flight to another (UK-->US-->NZ) - it's probably different from international to domestic.
 
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athersgeo

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #54 on: Today at 02:43:14 AM »
The U.S. does not recognize transit (we don't even do transit visas)  so I don't know how you would have been able to avoid picking up your luggage after immigration and then handing back over, Sara Crewe. If it's on one ticket after you clear customs you hand your bags over to waiting employees then continue on to security.

That must be a fairly new thing. I've done transit in the US several times (no visa needed, as we weren't allowed to leave the transit lounge), and we definitely didn't have to get our luggage. But again, that was from one international flight to another (UK-->US-->NZ) - it's probably different from international to domestic.

It's not new - my father talked about having to do it when he flew to LA back in the early 80s and I had to do it when I used to fly via Washington Dulles, travelling to Philadelphia upwards of ten years ago. That said, mine was definitely an international-to-domestic journey and I'm assuming my father's was as well, so that may well be the difference.

MariaE

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #55 on: Today at 03:25:56 AM »
The U.S. does not recognize transit (we don't even do transit visas)  so I don't know how you would have been able to avoid picking up your luggage after immigration and then handing back over, Sara Crewe. If it's on one ticket after you clear customs you hand your bags over to waiting employees then continue on to security.

That must be a fairly new thing. I've done transit in the US several times (no visa needed, as we weren't allowed to leave the transit lounge), and we definitely didn't have to get our luggage. But again, that was from one international flight to another (UK-->US-->NZ) - it's probably different from international to domestic.

It's not new - my father talked about having to do it when he flew to LA back in the early 80s and I had to do it when I used to fly via Washington Dulles, travelling to Philadelphia upwards of ten years ago. That said, mine was definitely an international-to-domestic journey and I'm assuming my father's was as well, so that may well be the difference.

Oh, it's absolutely different for international-->domestic journeys. I just assumed iridaceae was talking about international-->international since she mentioned transit visas.
 
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iridaceae

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #56 on: Today at 03:50:18 AM »
For the U.S. -depending on the nationality and the individual-you either need a visa or an ESTA, even if you are in transit. I thank Canadians might be exempt.
Nothing to see here.

MariaE

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Re: No, I won't be your carrier
« Reply #57 on: Today at 04:00:45 AM »
For the U.S. -depending on the nationality and the individual-you either need a visa or an ESTA, even if you are in transit. I thank Canadians might be exempt.

It's been awhile, but during my last transit stay in the US (back in 1999) neither was necessary for a flight coming from Heathrow to L.A. But we absolutely, positively weren't allowed to leave the transit lounge.
 
Dane by birth, Kiwi by choice