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  • May 02, 2016, 08:38:11 PM

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Author Topic: Food complaints  (Read 3238 times)

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rose red

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Re: Food complaints
« Reply #30 on: Today at 01:44:57 PM »
With the clues given, I'm wondering if it's the "rain forest" place. They are crazy expense for the type of food they serve, but their portions are usually pretty hardy. Of course that's just a guess and it may be a different chain. I hope the OP comes back to tell us how many pieces there were and the size.

I'm still unclear about the rules of naming names, so I thought I'd play it safe.
« Last Edit: Today at 01:49:07 PM by rose red »

#borecore

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Re: Food complaints
« Reply #31 on: Today at 01:49:25 PM »
You can say Rainforest Cafe, but I don't think it really matters in this case if that was the restaurant.


floridamom

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Re: Food complaints
« Reply #32 on: Today at 01:50:59 PM »
Personally, I think he was rude and a bit OTT.  I would never complain about the size/portion if someone was treating me.  You said he wasn't your favorite person and I can understand why.  I would only complain as PP mentioned if the food was overcooked or undercooked.  Only one time did I really ever complain to a manager about the food I ordered.  That was in my previous life as long haul truck driver with my ex. We were at a chain truck stop in TX.  I had ordered chicken parm.  What I got was a piece of fried chicken with some marinara sauce and a slice of yellow american cheese on top. UGH. LOL

Hopefully you can talk to your daughter privately and find out more what happened.  She may want to vent as well.  I would be upset and embarrassed if one of my guests did that and was rewarded a second dish and a complimentary glass. 

rose red

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Re: Food complaints
« Reply #33 on: Today at 01:53:28 PM »
You can say Rainforest Cafe, but I don't think it really matters in this case if that was the restaurant.

No, but if someone is familiar with the dish, they can let us know the size. Right now, I'm imagining two shrimps and two scallops for $50 ;), and not the jumbo size.

eta: Again, I think the way he complained was rude, but I still think it's ok to give feedback politely if there's a real reason, especially if the waiter asked. I wouldn't speak up with clients or someone you just met, but I'm pretty comfortable with close friends and family (especially with family ;D)
« Last Edit: Today at 01:59:27 PM by rose red »

mime

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Re: Food complaints
« Reply #34 on: Today at 02:32:59 PM »
In this situation I'd be quiet. For a clear problem like getting eggplant when I ordered chicken, I'd definitely send my plate back, but for something so subjective as portion size, I'd have more to consider:

-I may feel justified in complaining, and it can be good for a business to get feedback. (and sure: free stuff  ::) )
-I would cause awkwardness with the others at the table, especially for the hosts who presumably wants their guests to be happy.
-The small portion size may just be a problem with my own expectations.
-I'd have to weigh one against the other and decide what I want more: feedback to the business or no awkwardness at the table of guests that *I'm* not hosting.

I'd go with keeping my mouth shut and remembering to go somewhere else in the future... or to order the turkey burger next time.


Zizi-K

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Re: Food complaints
« Reply #35 on: Today at 04:31:34 PM »
I think there's a difference between having a quiet word with the waiter that the portion you received was smaller than you expected and announcing that "the portion was the smallest on the face of the earth." The latter is hyperbole and seems calculated to "get something" out of the restaurant rather than provide feedback. As the host, I would be embarrassed by my guest, I would feel that they handled it poorly and were being ungrateful for a free meal, and would hope that they would eat another piece of bread or order a dessert rather than complaining like that.

Mammavan3

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Re: Food complaints
« Reply #36 on: Today at 08:10:39 PM »
DD and DSIL invited us and the other set of grandparents out to dinner to celebrate one of our DGSs' birthday. The restaurant is not a local one, but kid-friendly and extremely accommodating to food allergies, a necessity for one of the boys. It's a themed chain and not up-scale dining.

I ordered an inexpensive salad and DH had a burger. Both were good; DH said his fries were excellent. When the waitress inquired if our meal was satisfactory, DD's FIL told her that the shrimp and scallops (one of the most expensive options) were "the smallest on the face of the earth."  The manager came over to ask about his complaint, apologized profusely, and brought out another portion of shrimp and scallops.  They also brought out a Pilsner glass wrapped for him to take home, but I was talking with DGS and don't know how that came about.  The restaurant has signature drinks that (for an additional charge) come in a souvenir glass, but that was not an option for beer glasses.

If I received masked potatoes when I asked for baked or if my meat was well-done when I asked for rare, I would ask that the mistake be corrected, but as a guest of someone else I don't think I'd complain about the quality or portion size.

Am I seeing rudeness where none exists?  The man is not one of my favorite people so I wonder if something that I wouldn't notice if done or said by someone else just rubs me the wrong way when he does it.

In general, no I do not think a guest should make complaints when being treated unless it truly is severe issue. But my exception is with close family. Were I the DD or DSIL I would have actually appreciated him speaking up about any complaints. I don't want to pay for a meal my guests don't enjoy.

I would have been slightly irritated to learn you were focused on the cost and selecting your meal based on price instead of want. Unless you know because your DD told you that this plan to take the family out to dinner was significantly stretching her budget but she felt coerced into hosting it, then I think you as a guest should graciously accept their generosity and treat it as intended. My MIL used to order the cheapest if she knew we were treating and it drove me crazy because it was apparent when they were treating she'd order a standard main course but whenever we did it was always the lowest possible cost. The $6 difference wasn't going to make an impact on our budget and if it was then we really shouldn't be taking people out to eat. I finally got to where I'd say things like "MIL, I picked this place because I know you love stuffed shrimp and theirs are the best I've had."

I know that our opinions are shaped by our experiences, but in my circle it is considered rude to order the most expensive menu item when someone else is picking up the bill. Neither DH or I ordered the cheapest menu item; our entrees were in the middle of the price range, and since they are more in line with the type of restaurant it is, they were quite good. I know that DD and her DH are on a tight budget and are very careful with their money. There are probably things that they denied themselves to host a nice dinner for my DGS, and her FIL's meal cost 60% more than anyone else's. The last time DD and DSIL took us to dinner, the rest of us ordered only entrees since extended, multi-course meals were a little more than a very active two-year-old could sit quietly through; her FIL  ordered soup, an appetizer, an entree, and then another bowl of soup.  I remember it because I've never seen anyone else order soup at the beginning and end of a meal.


To clarify, the complaint was not about the size of the portion, but rather the size of the shrimp and scallops themselves.  There were three averaged-sized coconut shrimp and a ramekin of scallops; I didn't see their size, but bay scallops are often rather small. (Perhaps he was expecting sea scallops?) In my experience, that is a pretty usual serving.  My Cobb salad was huge, and DH's burger was a normal size.