Author Topic: interrupting someone on the treadmill  (Read 5380 times)

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rigs32

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Re: interrupting someone on the treadmill
« Reply #60 on: May 17, 2013, 12:11:58 PM »
It is inappropriate to use equipment at an intensity where a pause or break could result in injury.

Really?  Isn't that the case for any heavy weightlifting?

When I do back squats, with the equivalent of my body weight on the bar, I absolutely need that level of concentration or I may break form and possible injure myself.  It happened to me a couple months ago.  One of the guys spotting me started talking about the firefighters that were ambushed.  Since I knew them, it broke my concentration and my workout was done for the day.  I couldn't get back into that focused mindset.  I spoke to him, and he hasn't done something similar since, but it was rude of him, IMO.

Yvaine

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Re: interrupting someone on the treadmill
« Reply #61 on: May 17, 2013, 12:20:56 PM »
I think of it this way, if a stranger stopped me in the street when I was in the n middle of something and asked me if "I'd got a minute", I'd probably say no too.  This is usually a lead into selling me something or getting me to sign up for a charity. You were fine op.    in my gym there are personal trainers that ply for trade by standing next to the machines and interrupting your work outs with "hey, if you've got a minute, I can help you get a better workout for only 40 a one hour session!"  No thanks!

Yes, this. It reminds me of the "Can I ask you a question" from the lotion kiosk people. It's almost always a line, whether a pickup line or a sales line. Most of the time when people approach me with "normal" questions (like directions or something), they just ask them, or they say "Excuse me" and then ask. And you don't keep prodding someone if they're giving the signals of "go away"; that's obnoxious.

Twik

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Re: interrupting someone on the treadmill
« Reply #62 on: May 17, 2013, 12:51:55 PM »
No matter where you are, if someone's body language makes it obvious that she is not interested in speaking to you, you don't persist in trying to speak to her. Especially if she's occupied with some kind of task. If it's an emergency, you lead with that. I doubt very much that this guy had something urgently important to communicate.

Yes. "RUN FOR YOUR LIFE - GODZILLA IS ADVANCING ON THE CITY!" is not something you start off with by asking, "Do you have a minute?"
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alis

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Re: interrupting someone on the treadmill
« Reply #63 on: May 17, 2013, 01:06:13 PM »
It is inappropriate to use equipment at an intensity where a pause or break could result in injury.

Really?  Isn't that the case for any heavy weightlifting?

When I do back squats, with the equivalent of my body weight on the bar, I absolutely need that level of concentration or I may break form and possible injure myself.  It happened to me a couple months ago.  One of the guys spotting me started talking about the firefighters that were ambushed.  Since I knew them, it broke my concentration and my workout was done for the day.  I couldn't get back into that focused mindset.  I spoke to him, and he hasn't done something similar since, but it was rude of him, IMO.

Actually, my sport is powerlifting, and I still disagree sorry. I don't see treadmill running as any comparison to a spotter (presumably on a max lift) start talking during the lift. There are very strict rules about not speaking when spotting in the sport. There is no similar rule for approaching a normal gymgoer just running on a treadmill.

As I said, I agree to disagree, I respectfully bow out of this because I guess I am the only one who doesn't think it's rude....

snowdragon

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Re: interrupting someone on the treadmill
« Reply #64 on: May 17, 2013, 01:39:57 PM »
I think it's fine if the OP said no, she didn't want to answer.

I just don't think he was rude for initially asking, as others have said. Everyone has a right to refuse a question but that doesn't necessarily mean asking a question is rude (the CONTENT may be rude of course, but not the actual act of asking a question during that activity).


I don't go to the gym to hang out with strangers, to chat them up or whatever. The staff is there to answer questions about machine use - I am not.  My gym has enough cardio machines that no one should ever have to wait for a machine, so asking when they are going to be done is not an issue. There is no reason why a person working out should be interrupted because someone wants to ask a question. Why should someone in the middle of a workout have to be interrupted to explain something to answer questions for another member - that's not their job. And it's not why they come to the gym.
  I do think interrupting someone in the middle of their workout is rude. rude, self-serving and annoying. It does not matter if "not all questions need to be addressed by staff" that is what staff is there for. Other people are simply there to do their work outs.  And the reason I get most often from other patrons is some variant of either stop what I am doing and move to another machine or stop what I am doing and teach them what to do on a particular machine. Neither can be framed as  not being used.
  As for not using machines unless you can answer questions while using it - how the heck am I supposed to get to the point that I can do that - if I am not allowed to use it until I can????  I know of no one who the first time or even the first few times that someone uses a new machine or a new speed that they don't need to concentrate, so our only option is to stay home and work out there?  Yeah...understood.  Fortunately for me - that's not the way the world works.
  If I had been in the OP's situation I would have told the guy to go away the first time he tried to talk to me - getting in my space, waving at me and whatnot.  After telling him to go away I would be complaining to staff.  Even if she was using the only treadmill in the gym - she was using it, she has that right, he can wait in turn.
 

KenveeB

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Re: interrupting someone on the treadmill
« Reply #65 on: May 17, 2013, 02:16:35 PM »
Aren't headphones the universal gym symbol for "don't bother me"? I've even worn them sometimes when I didn't have anything playing just to communicate that I didn't want to chit-chat. I don't think that there's anything rude with briefly interrupting someone on a treadmill for an important issue, and I don't think there's anything wrong with throwing out some idle chit-chat to see if the other person wants to chat. But if it's an important issue, that should be clearly and quickly communicated. ("Your shoes are on fire" versus "Do you have a minute?") And if it's chit-chat, you don't interrupt the other person for it. So this guy's mistake was in interrupting someone in mid-workout in order to chit-chat, and that mistake is worse when it's someone already communicating that they're not interested in chit-chat by wearing headphones.

I do agree with alis, though, that working out at a level where a minor interruption will cause a major injury is not working out the right way. There are always going to be distractions. I do interval workouts on the treadmill and elliptical, so I understand the "I'm going all-out as hard as I possibly can right now" issue. But if it's at a risk of hurting yourself if someone does need to interrupt you for something important, then you're not doing it right. You need to either bring down the intensity level, get instruction for how to use the equipment more safely, or find a different kind of workout.

Tea Drinker

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Re: interrupting someone on the treadmill
« Reply #66 on: May 17, 2013, 02:22:33 PM »
At my former gym, the etiquette was that you could ask for a cardio machine if and only if the current user had been on it for at least half an hour (there were signs posted with the maximum time). For the nautilus and other resistance machines, I would wait until the person was between sets, or try to catch their eye if they seemed to be doing dozens of reps without a break, and then ask to work in.

Questions about the equipment should be taken to the staff. Things that are appropriate to say to someone else who is exercising are "you dropped something" or "is that your Kindle/cell phone/iPod?" Even if it's not meant as a come-on, don't interrupt me mid-set to tell me you like my tattoos. And don't ask "Do you come here often?" Yes, that actually happened.
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blahblahblah

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Re: interrupting someone on the treadmill
« Reply #67 on: May 17, 2013, 03:17:34 PM »
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If I had been in the OP's situation I would have told the guy to go away the first time he tried to talk to me - getting in my space, waving at me and whatnot. 
I might have if I hadn't been trying to focus on my running, because it sorta weirded me out how he just stood there watching me, not even using the treadmill he was on. So I finally turned to him when I was in recovery/walking mode to make him go away.

I mean, if his goal was really to hit on me, then dude had no game at all. ;) It's kinda creepy being stared at like that.
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But if it's at a risk of hurting yourself if someone does need to interrupt you for something important, then you're not doing it right. You need to either bring down the intensity level, get instruction for how to use the equipment more safely, or find a different kind of workout.
Right, but even if you're normally very coordinated, all it takes is one slip while running on the treadmill to fall and hurt yourself. 

I mentioned upthread that I almost slipped and fell while walking on the treadmill, because I inadvertently stepped partway off the belt. (Fortunately, I managed to catch the railing before I fell and completely embarrassed myself.) That doesn't mean that I'm no longer going to even walk on the treadmill; there is always a risk, no matter how slight, of hurting yourself. [Expletive] happens, after all. I just have an issue with someone unnecessarily increasing that risk by trying to chat me up if it's not necessary. I'm willing to risk it if the gym's on fire, of course. :P

ETA: And since others have mentioned it, yes, I think the fact that he stood off to the side aggravated the situation.
« Last Edit: May 17, 2013, 03:24:18 PM by blahblahblah »