Author Topic: Rolling Pins  (Read 1555 times)

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Amara

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Rolling Pins
« on: April 11, 2013, 12:56:55 PM »
Although this isn't a recipe request, it is not too far off topic. I have ordered a French, that is, tapered rolling pin to use. I grew up on the standard wooden rolling pin so am looking forward to this. I have never owned a marble one and would love to buy a tapered one of those but they apparently don't exist. :( In searching Amazon, I came across some stainless steel ones as well. But if you use them, I would like to know which one(s). Do you have more than one or just one for everything? If so, what size and type(s)? Do you use them for different thing? Tell all!

nrb80

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2013, 12:58:43 PM »
What are you using it for?   Marble is great for pastry.   I have used steel, but only if I prechill for pastry.  I LOVE silicone, btw.

alkira6

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2013, 01:05:56 PM »
I have a wooden rolling pin with no handles. I am kind of "meh" about it.  I wish I had marble one, but I am currently "borrowing" a stainless steel one from a relative to see how I like it.  I love it for pastry!  It has an insert that can be chilled or frozen and that sucker stays cold forever.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2013, 01:28:38 PM »
I used a wooden one with handles for years.  A friend gave me her old marble one with handles.  I like it for pastry but not so much for cookies - I find it harder to get an even roll out with it.

I've never used a handleless one.
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Amara

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2013, 01:52:39 PM »
I'll be using it mostly but not exclusively for pastry. I just ordered the tapered French wooden one from Amazon, but am considering buying a marble one too.

The stainless steel caught my eye, and I am very interested to hear about the inset that can be chilled. Which one do you have, Alkira6?

And Nrb80, tell me more about your silicone one. I have never heard of that. How does it work and what do you use it for?

Sheila Take a Bow

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2013, 01:52:52 PM »
A friend once gave me a variety of rolling pins, plus I already owned one, so here's my take:

I grew up using a wooden rolling pin with handles.  I like it, but I wish the surface was a bit bigger.

The French rolling pin is okay, but I am not always a fan of the tapering.  It takes some getting used to.

My favorite is a wood one with no handles and no tapering.  I like it because it's easier for me to keep everything even.  It's wide enough for everything I do, it's easy to use, and it's not too heavy.

Then there's my marble rolling pin.  It's *so* heavy that it's really easy to roll the pastry too thin.  I don't really like to use it; the wooden one is so much easier for me.  (Though I have told my husband that in case of the zombie apocalypse, I'm arming myself with the marble rolling pin.)

alkira6

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2013, 02:02:58 PM »
I'll be using it mostly but not exclusively for pastry. I just ordered the tapered French wooden one from Amazon, but am considering buying a marble one too.

The stainless steel caught my eye, and I am very interested to hear about the inset that can be chilled. Which one do you have, Alkira6?

And Nrb80, tell me more about your silicone one. I have never heard of that. How does it work and what do you use it for?

I can't find the exact one but it is similar to this http://www.amazon.com/Cuisipro-Stay-Cool-Rolling-Pin/dp/B000G1EA1S

That one you can fill with cold water and/or ice cubes for weight and chilling power.  The one I am borrowing is very similar, but the handle screws off and there is a slender rubberish tube that comes out that can be filed with water and chilled or frezen and then put back.  I'll text my cousin and see if she can remember where she got it. It might be pampered chef, a lot of her stuff is from them.

jpcher

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2013, 02:52:04 PM »
I'm curious, Amara, what are the benefits of a tapered rolling pin?

It would seem, to me, that there would be an uneven thickness of the dough. Or is there a trick to using it? Pressing down on one side, then the other? Is this something that takes skill and needs to be mastered?


I have a plain wooden pin with the handles which suits me just fine, but I'm not much of a baker. I do like my mother's marble pin (with handles) because it's heavier and you don't need to use as much pressure to roll the dough out.

Amara

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2013, 04:31:40 PM »
I've always used the familiar American ones with handles but thought about the tapered ones for a while now. Apparently, they are better for pie and other pastry dough. I'm not sure why though. I know it will take a bit to get used to it, but that's okay. This is the one I got: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000KESQ1G/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

I also just ordered one without handles but not tapered ( http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000IYYG26/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 ) because of this from The Splendid Table: http://www.splendidtable.org/story/rolling-pins

It's interesting that they dislike both the marble and the aluminum ones as well as the ones you can chill. Alkira6, do you have any condensation problems? I don't (yet) have a subscription to ATK online. If anyone does (and is willing to look), do they have a recommendation?

With all the fresh fruit coming up pies are in the air, especially blueberry and cherry.
« Last Edit: April 11, 2013, 04:34:11 PM by Amara »

alkira6

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #9 on: April 11, 2013, 04:48:17 PM »
I have had absolutely no problems with condensation, I have no idea why. I take it as magic and just keep going.

PastryGoddess

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #10 on: April 11, 2013, 06:01:15 PM »
I have both a marble and wooden rolling pins with handles.  I like the tapered ones, but they don't have quite enough heft to keep unruly dough in line.  I have found that the handled ones are more versatile for me. 

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #11 on: April 11, 2013, 06:29:14 PM »
I have a wooden handleless one that has a cord which hangs on the cupboard when I'm not using it. I use it for pastry and the end is good as a basic pestle.

DH calls it a husband tamer.

Raina

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2013, 06:07:00 PM »
My pin is wood and tapers, no handles.  I love it and have used it for years.  It's glorious for rolling out pie crust :) I love how it tapers because I'll just keep one hand on one tapered end to sort of hold that end still while I use the other hand to roll and it helps keep the crust even (it obviously doesn't roll straight like this, so you kind of make a curve with the pin).  Really love it, use it for everything from croissants, puff pastry etc to biscuits if I want an even top.

I have used a marble pin before, straight with no tapers and handles, and found it super unwieldy because it was so heavy! Really did not enjoy it at all and would not purchase one for myself.  I have a slab of marble that is like a cutting board but with little feet on it, the kind used for rolling out pastry that I can chill in the fridge before using and I prefer to use that plus the french pin. 

ladyknight1

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2013, 06:26:46 PM »
I have a plastic rolling pin to use for fondant, or small pieces, with bands to control thickness. We have a marble rolling pin with handles we received as a wedding gift that is too heavy and bulky for me to use. We do have a wooden pin with handles.

I use a tapered French rolling pin 99% of the time, over a few months of using it, I have grown to love it and I prefer it to all others. The pins with handles seem to always be too narrow, or the handles get in my way.

Amara

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Re: Rolling Pins
« Reply #14 on: April 12, 2013, 10:13:10 PM »
The rolling pin arrived!
( http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000KESQ1G/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1  )

I am surprised at how lightweight it is, but it feels sturdy nonetheless. It is a true beauty, and I can't wait to make some pasta tomorrow. (I do own a handcranked pasta mill, but want to try using a pin instead.)

I may buy another one without handles but that is not tapered. It depends on how well this does with some pie crusts as well as pasta. If not this weekend, maybe a blueberry pie next week as fresh blueberries have been out for a while now. Have to wait on the cherries, though.