Author Topic: Applying by email  (Read 1865 times)

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Knitterly

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Applying by email
« on: April 17, 2013, 09:14:36 AM »
I am applying for a new job.  The job posting requests that resumes be send by email.

When one applies for a job by email, does one put the cover letter as an attachment or as the body of the email?

(If this should be under technoquette, I apologize - wasn't sure where this fit the best).

hjaye

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #1 on: April 17, 2013, 09:47:13 AM »
I would always put it in the body of the email.

I would give them my name, tell them I am responding to their need for whatever the job title was, tell them I believed I was an excellent fit for their company, and then a brief explanation of why I believed that. I would tell them how long I have been working in the industry, give them a brief run down of the responsibilities I have had, some of the important things I accomplished and tell them I was attaching my resume for their considerations, give them my contact information, the best times and way and to contact me. I would end it by telling them I was looking forward to talking with them and discussing this opportunity in greater detail.

Knitterly

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #2 on: April 17, 2013, 09:52:36 AM »
Thanks.  My first impulse was to put it in the body of the email.  I already have the letter written and proof-read (mr K is an amazing proofreader). 

I am sure it doesn't technically matter.  I don't expect them to actually be inundated with applications for the role.  They will likely get 3 or 4 applications at most. 

DaDancingPsych

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2013, 10:37:01 AM »
I don't know what etiquette says, although I figure by now there must be a rule, but I have seen it both ways. Using the body of the letter as the cover letter, as well as including the cover letter as the first page of the document attached. I, personally, prefer a mix of both. In the body of the email, include a short explanation of why you are sending this, sell yourself a smidge (give the main reason you are perfect for the job), and include your contact information. Then include a longer, more formal cover letter with the resume. This way, I can save off your resume and pass it along to the hiring manager with the cover letter included, but then I also know what I am opening when I read the email.

reflection5

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2013, 10:51:07 AM »
I am applying for a new job.  The job posting requests that resumes be send by email.

When one applies for a job by email, does one put the cover letter as an attachment or as the body of the email?

(If this should be under technoquette, I apologize - wasn't sure where this fit the best).

The cover letter is the application.
The attachment should be the resume.

audrey1962

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2013, 10:52:04 AM »
I always include the cover letter and resume as a pdf that is attached. I do this to make it easier for the hiring manager. I've been on the hiring side before and whenever someone included the cover letter in the e-mail I had to copy it, paste it into a Word doc, and someone attach it to the resume so that it could be included when the team was reviewing all the materials.

I don't think there is any definitive rule on this however.

jmarvellous

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #6 on: April 17, 2013, 11:45:17 AM »
I hired a career coach when looking for my current job. Cover letter in body of email, no question; you can attach it as a properly formatted PDF or Word doc if you want, as well. Resume attached as PDF or Word file, too -- keeping in mind that formatting can be lost between word versions, so any special fonts or designs should be PDFs.

ladyknight1

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #7 on: April 17, 2013, 12:45:32 PM »
Thanks.  My first impulse was to put it in the body of the email.  I already have the letter written and proof-read (mr K is an amazing proofreader). 

I am sure it doesn't technically matter.  I don't expect them to actually be inundated with applications for the role.  They will likely get 3 or 4 applications at most.

You might be surprised! We have been getting 200 - 300 applicants for low level positions in my field.

Minmom3

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #8 on: April 17, 2013, 09:49:00 PM »
I always include the cover letter and resume as a pdf that is attached. I do this to make it easier for the hiring manager. I've been on the hiring side before and whenever someone included the cover letter in the e-mail I had to copy it, paste it into a Word doc, and someone attach it to the resume so that it could be included when the team was reviewing all the materials.

I don't think there is any definitive rule on this however.

About half of the jobs I've applied for over the past 6 months have wanted the resume in the body of the email.  My resume is in Word, there's no reason it can't be opened as an attachment, but sometimes there IS a conflict, and it's less of a pain for people to have the thing in the email, even though formatting gets lost.  Better that than having to go back and say 'can you resend that, pleeze'....
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Deetee

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #9 on: April 17, 2013, 11:12:11 PM »
I always do the cover letter and resume as PDF attachments as I assume they will print those. I write a brief message listing what I'm sending.

Dindrane

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #10 on: April 17, 2013, 11:15:36 PM »
I would think that, ultimately, it doesn't really matter all that much (if they haven't specified), as long as it's a formal cover letter.

However, personally, I would never put my cover letter in the body of an email. I'd do what one poster said up above and attach the formal cover letter to the email, but include a short paragraph in the email indicating what I am applying for, what documents I have attached, and perhaps one reason why I'd be a good candidate for the position. I would also definitely, definitely include my full contact information in the email itself, as well as on the cover letter and in the resume.

Speaking as someone who processes all the resumes for my department, my favorite applications are the ones that have the brief email statement with all contact information (so it's easy for me to record their pertinent info), but attach their cover letter, resume, etc. as a single .pdf document. My department distributes resumes electronically, so if they attach 5 different files, I have to compile them into a single .pdf anyway. Bonus points if the applicant has vague names for their files and/or attaches them in a strange order (i.e. resume then cover letter).

It's not a problem to get multiple documents, or Word documents, or cover letters in the body of the email, but it does annoy me and increases the odds that their application materials won't present well. I include all emails anyway, and I have Acrobat Pro (which means I can compile various document types into a single .pdf relatively quickly). So a cover letter in an email will still be present, but it never looks as nice as one that was sent as a separate document.

A few other tips, since you are emailing your resume (at least) as an attachment:
  • The best way to name the file is with your name (first initial and last name is usually good, to save on length) and be sure to include what the document is (i.e. "JSmith Resume" or "GJones Cover Letter").
  • Make sure that you don't have any stray blank pages, because that is either something that somebody has to take out, or it gets left in and potentially works against you.
  • Color can be a really nice touch on a resume, but make sure it will still look okay if it's printed in black and white
  • Send it as a .pdf if at all possible, unless you can be reasonably certain that the person receiving it has your word processing software. It's a relatively safe bet that a business has Word. It's somewhat more rare that they have Pages (unless the industry is one that tends to use Apple computers heavily). It's annoying for me when I have to ask candidates for a position to send their materials in a different format, and I'm sure some employers just ignore any applications with documents they can't open.
  • Make sure your email address shows up with your first and last name (i.e. "John Smith <jsmith@email.com>"). It's really hard to find an email from someone who has not done that.


cicero

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #11 on: April 18, 2013, 06:55:49 AM »
first - read the instructions because some employers request the cover letter and resume as one or two separate (attached) documents. personally, i always attach the cover letter with the resume (as an employer who sometimes has to deal with applications i find it easier to handle when it's all in one document), then i put my contact info (basically copy-paste my "heading") on the email, and a brief message "dear so and so, attached please find my cv and cover for this position. I look forward blah blah"


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Knitterly

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Re: Applying by email
« Reply #12 on: April 18, 2013, 09:10:34 AM »
Thanks all.

I submitted my resume yesterday.  I did as some suggested earlier and put the letter in the body of the email, but also attached it as a pdf for easy printing.  I attached my resume as a pdf, too, rather than a word document.

I also considered what someone else said about possibly being surprised about the number of applicants.  I think they may be right.  I still would be flat out shocked if more than a dozen people applied, but I may have some more competition than I originally had considered.  If so, I wouldn't be sad to lose out on the job. 
It's a position at my church, so the applications will come from within the body of the church.  The most likely applicants will be fresh graduates - probably teaching grads - looking for something part-time to pay the bills while they look for something full time in their field.  If I lost out to such a person, I'd actually be quite happy for them.

I decided firmly against asking the current coordinator for a reference.  I know she would provide one, but given the above, there could be several people whom she has formed friendships with who may ask her for the same.  Better not to put her in the awkward position of having to choose.  If her reference goes to someone else, I'm okay with that.  :)  She did give me a heads up on whom I should specifically address my letter to, so that was helpful.

I hope to hear by next week.  I know they want the position filled asap.