Author Topic: Homework help, Australian culture  (Read 9301 times)

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StarFaerie

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #105 on: April 30, 2013, 10:46:40 PM »
I love voting. You go to your local school on the Saturday, spend 5 minutes or so marking some boxes on a piece of paper (I've never had to line up) and then you get to go out th exit door and buy a sausage from the sausage sizzle and a cake from the cake stall. I call it sausage sizzle and cake day. I look forward to it as a treat. It's like a mini school fete without the crowds or children. Bring on September 14!

Julian

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #106 on: May 01, 2013, 01:53:51 AM »
Where I live the local polling booth is around 200m from my house.  A gentle stroll, and there you are.  Alas, very little usually on the cake and sausage sizzle front though.  And apparently voting for local government here isn't compulsory either.   ??? 

Re not seeing the critters - lots of our natives are nocturnal, so they'll be curled up in burrows or hollow trees or branches all day.  The only time I've seen a possum out in daylight hours was in FN Queensland, and it was a blind one.

I've only seen two or three wallabies here (Tasmania) during daylight hours, but at night...  wow.  One night a few months ago I counted 27 in a 15km stretch of road.  Poor things were crossing to get to the river on the other side, and there was a bush fire up in the hills behind them.  Pademelons come out in shadier forested areas sometimes, if you want a native animal to squee over, these are it.  Tiny little fat kangaroo-like things, about half the size of the average house cat.  If you're very quiet and still, they'll come right up to you. 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ron-alenka/2048205518/

I've seen one wild wombat, at night right next to the road.  They look so much like rocks sometimes, it's hard to tell.   I do see a few echidnas about, they're adorable things.  The Tassie ones tend to be more furry and less prickly than the mainland ones.  And you can still occasionally see platypus in the local rivers on overcast days.

We also get flocks of yellow-tailed black cockatoos here - they sit in the top of my pine trees and rob the cones.  Noisy as heck, but they're spectacular in flight.  Flocks of sulphur crested cockies and pink and grey galahs are common, and in the rural areas I often see other small parrots such as green lorrikeets feeding on grass seed.

The best place to see Tasmanian Devils now, unfortunately, is in one of the wildlife parks.  The facial tumour disease has really knocked the population badly - they estimate around 90% of wild devils have been affected and died.  It's tragic.  Devils are gorgeous, awkward, dopey looking things about the size of a small dog - they sort of wander around, blinking a lot at the light, staggering slightly as if they're drunk.  They can open their mouths incredibly wide, and they really do turn into Taz at feeding time!
http://tasmanpeninsula.com.au/wp/attractions/tasmanian-devil/
http://www.animalpictureplace.com/tasmanian-devil-pictures/tasmanian-devil-growling.jpg.php

Iris

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #107 on: May 01, 2013, 02:28:40 AM »
Where I live the local polling booth is around 200m from my house.  A gentle stroll, and there you are.  Alas, very little usually on the cake and sausage sizzle front though.  And apparently voting for local government here isn't compulsory either.   ??? 

I got a 'please explain or pay a fine' letter after the last local government election, so I'm guessing in my state at least it's compulsory. I'm a fan of compulsory voting. You are quite free to write "get nicked" across your ballot paper so I don't see it as compulsory voting, I see it as compulsory turning up and getting your name marked off.

Quote
Re not seeing the critters - lots of our natives are nocturnal, so they'll be curled up in burrows or hollow trees or branches all day.  The only time I've seen a possum out in daylight hours was in FN Queensland, and it was a blind one.

I have a fond memory of being on a bus all day with a group of US tourists going around our local vineyards. At the end of the day after the last vineyard, one of them asked me where would be the best place to travel to to see kangaroos. I replied "They're all around, it's just got to be the right time of day, when the sun is going down. About now would be right. See, there they are" and pointed to the 'roos hopping through the vines on the hill across the road. It's the most perfect timing of anything in my life.  :)

We saw dozens on the drive home, after not seeing a single one all day.
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cabbageweevil

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #108 on: May 01, 2013, 02:58:53 AM »
No, we're born the only ones. There's one other country, Switzerland, I think.

We also don't take away the right to vote. They set up polling in jails, for instance.

As for being told what to do...well, it has the trade off of being able to put your vote in and tell who you don't like to **** off. Elections are held on weekends, so there's no excuse. But, we're not very political. We'd like our pollies to get on with governing and not grandstand or waffle on. You'd never see filibustering in Australian parliament, they'd be told to shut up and sit down.

Thanks KG, and everyone else, for information about voting matters. I imagined its being compulsory nowhere but in Australia, but learn that "definitely no so".

I've had perhaps an exaggerated notion of the Australian loathing of being rule-constrained and ordered about. Comes partly perhaps, from what I've read about the amazement felt by the British armed forces in the World Wars, at how "democratic" their Australian counterparts seemed -- privates arguing, and disputing things, with captains, etc. -- and at what highly effective fighters the Aussies were, notwithstanding.

To a question from another PP: various reasons imaginable, for not wanting to vote. I personally feel that to be allowed to vote, one should have a certain minimal level of knowledge and interest about politics and current affairs, which not everyone has. Having almost zero such knowledge and interest myself, I abstain from exercising my right to vote.

cabbageweevil

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #109 on: May 01, 2013, 03:05:39 AM »
Re not seeing the critters - lots of our natives are nocturnal, so they'll be curled up in burrows or hollow trees or branches all day.  The only time I've seen a possum out in daylight hours was in FN Queensland, and it was a blind one.

I've only seen two or three wallabies here (Tasmania) during daylight hours, but at night...  wow.  One night a few months ago I counted 27 in a 15km stretch of road.  Poor things were crossing to get to the river on the other side, and there was a bush fire up in the hills behind them.  Pademelons come out in shadier forested areas sometimes, if you want a native animal to squee over, these are it.  Tiny little fat kangaroo-like things, about half the size of the average house cat.  If you're very quiet and still, they'll come right up to you. 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ron-alenka/2048205518/

I've seen one wild wombat, at night right next to the road.  They look so much like rocks sometimes, it's hard to tell.   I do see a few echidnas about, they're adorable things.  The Tassie ones tend to be more furry and less prickly than the mainland ones.  And you can still occasionally see platypus in the local rivers on overcast days.

We also get flocks of yellow-tailed black cockatoos here - they sit in the top of my pine trees and rob the cones.  Noisy as heck, but they're spectacular in flight.  Flocks of sulphur crested cockies and pink and grey galahs are common, and in the rural areas I often see other small parrots such as green lorrikeets feeding on grass seed.

The best place to see Tasmanian Devils now, unfortunately, is in one of the wildlife parks.  The facial tumour disease has really knocked the population badly - they estimate around 90% of wild devils have been affected and died.  It's tragic.  Devils are gorgeous, awkward, dopey looking things about the size of a small dog - they sort of wander around, blinking a lot at the light, staggering slightly as if they're drunk.  They can open their mouths incredibly wide, and they really do turn into Taz at feeding time!
http://tasmanpeninsula.com.au/wp/attractions/tasmanian-devil/
http://www.animalpictureplace.com/tasmanian-devil-pictures/tasmanian-devil-growling.jpg.php

Thanks. Fascinating stuff -- I definitely want to visit Tasmania !

I'd read elsewhere about the Tasmanian Devil being in bad trouble -- heartbreaking. What I'd really love to see -- and greatly regret -- is the thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger: by all accounts a splendid, and splendidly weird, animal. Last seen for certain, in 1936 -- one gathers that there's thought to be a tiny possibility that a very few might survive, undetected, in remote locations; but not many people are holding their breath over that.

StarFaerie

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #110 on: May 01, 2013, 03:28:23 AM »
Re not seeing the critters - lots of our natives are nocturnal, so they'll be curled up in burrows or hollow trees or branches all day.  The only time I've seen a possum out in daylight hours was in FN Queensland, and it was a blind one.

I've only seen two or three wallabies here (Tasmania) during daylight hours, but at night...  wow.  One night a few months ago I counted 27 in a 15km stretch of road.  Poor things were crossing to get to the river on the other side, and there was a bush fire up in the hills behind them.  Pademelons come out in shadier forested areas sometimes, if you want a native animal to squee over, these are it.  Tiny little fat kangaroo-like things, about half the size of the average house cat.  If you're very quiet and still, they'll come right up to you. 
http://www.flickr.com/photos/ron-alenka/2048205518/

I've seen one wild wombat, at night right next to the road.  They look so much like rocks sometimes, it's hard to tell.   I do see a few echidnas about, they're adorable things.  The Tassie ones tend to be more furry and less prickly than the mainland ones.  And you can still occasionally see platypus in the local rivers on overcast days.

We also get flocks of yellow-tailed black cockatoos here - they sit in the top of my pine trees and rob the cones.  Noisy as heck, but they're spectacular in flight.  Flocks of sulphur crested cockies and pink and grey galahs are common, and in the rural areas I often see other small parrots such as green lorrikeets feeding on grass seed.

The best place to see Tasmanian Devils now, unfortunately, is in one of the wildlife parks.  The facial tumour disease has really knocked the population badly - they estimate around 90% of wild devils have been affected and died.  It's tragic.  Devils are gorgeous, awkward, dopey looking things about the size of a small dog - they sort of wander around, blinking a lot at the light, staggering slightly as if they're drunk.  They can open their mouths incredibly wide, and they really do turn into Taz at feeding time!
http://tasmanpeninsula.com.au/wp/attractions/tasmanian-devil/
http://www.animalpictureplace.com/tasmanian-devil-pictures/tasmanian-devil-growling.jpg.php

Thanks. Fascinating stuff -- I definitely want to visit Tasmania !

I'd read elsewhere about the Tasmanian Devil being in bad trouble -- heartbreaking. What I'd really love to see -- and greatly regret -- is the thylacine or Tasmanian Tiger: by all accounts a splendid, and splendidly weird, animal. Last seen for certain, in 1936 -- one gathers that there's thought to be a tiny possibility that a very few might survive, undetected, in remote locations; but not many people are holding their breath over that.

Tassie animals are nuts.

We stopped the car in a car park on the Freycinet Peninsula and the car was mobbed by wallabies. We couldn't get out without smacking one with the door. Stop moving and you may become wallaby food (may be exaggerating but only due to them not eating meat).

And those pademelons are brazen thieves. Be quiet and still and they'll approach nothing! I have a photo of one of them trying to break into our Esky at Cradle Mountain in broad daylight and it didn't move even when we tried to shoo it. Apparently they can open the latches on eskies to get to the bread and other goodies within (mutters about crazy Tassie animals)

Julian

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #111 on: May 01, 2013, 03:37:04 AM »
Bwahahahaha!!!  Crazy indeed!  Sorry you got mobbed and robbed, you must have run into the ones we train to rob the tourists!   ;D ;D ;D

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #112 on: May 01, 2013, 03:47:29 AM »
No, we're born the only ones. There's one other country, Switzerland, I think.

We also don't take away the right to vote. They set up polling in jails, for instance.

As for being told what to do...well, it has the trade off of being able to put your vote in and tell who you don't like to **** off. Elections are held on weekends, so there's no excuse. But, we're not very political. We'd like our pollies to get on with governing and not grandstand or waffle on. You'd never see filibustering in Australian parliament, they'd be told to shut up and sit down.

Thanks KG, and everyone else, for information about voting matters. I imagined its being compulsory nowhere but in Australia, but learn that "definitely no so".

I've had perhaps an exaggerated notion of the Australian loathing of being rule-constrained and ordered about. Comes partly perhaps, from what I've read about the amazement felt by the British armed forces in the World Wars, at how "democratic" their Australian counterparts seemed -- privates arguing, and disputing things, with captains, etc. -- and at what highly effective fighters the Aussies were, notwithstanding.

To a question from another PP: various reasons imaginable, for not wanting to vote. I personally feel that to be allowed to vote, one should have a certain minimal level of knowledge and interest about politics and current affairs, which not everyone has. Having almost zero such knowledge and interest myself, I abstain from exercising my right to vote.

Remember, in Australia you are not constrained by party. You can vote for a minor party or independent on any government level.

And we deplore voting machines and all their works! Paper was good enough for our grandfathers, it's good enough for us!

StarFaerie

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #113 on: May 01, 2013, 04:26:17 AM »
No, we're born the only ones. There's one other country, Switzerland, I think.

We also don't take away the right to vote. They set up polling in jails, for instance.

As for being told what to do...well, it has the trade off of being able to put your vote in and tell who you don't like to **** off. Elections are held on weekends, so there's no excuse. But, we're not very political. We'd like our pollies to get on with governing and not grandstand or waffle on. You'd never see filibustering in Australian parliament, they'd be told to shut up and sit down.

Thanks KG, and everyone else, for information about voting matters. I imagined its being compulsory nowhere but in Australia, but learn that "definitely no so".

I've had perhaps an exaggerated notion of the Australian loathing of being rule-constrained and ordered about. Comes partly perhaps, from what I've read about the amazement felt by the British armed forces in the World Wars, at how "democratic" their Australian counterparts seemed -- privates arguing, and disputing things, with captains, etc. -- and at what highly effective fighters the Aussies were, notwithstanding.

To a question from another PP: various reasons imaginable, for not wanting to vote. I personally feel that to be allowed to vote, one should have a certain minimal level of knowledge and interest about politics and current affairs, which not everyone has. Having almost zero such knowledge and interest myself, I abstain from exercising my right to vote.

Remember, in Australia you are not constrained by party. You can vote for a minor party or independent on any government level.

And we deplore voting machines and all their works! Paper was good enough for our grandfathers, it's good enough for us!

I think Australia is very open about politics. Almost everyone has an opinion on how the government is doing and I have had political discussions with near strangers (and I'm not that political and didn't bring it up with them). It's not really polite to ask directly who someone voted for but it is just fine to discuss political topics at the dinner table and to argue it with your friends who have differing views. I think because everyone has to vote, they at least have a vague idea of what's going on and who they are annoyed at currently and what for.

Also politics is high up in our news broadcasts. If I go to CNN.com, I have to look to find US political news (maybe because it is night there, you aren't currently in election mode and have a lot more news to fill the space). But on abc.net.au and news.com.au the top stories are currently political stories and it is regularly like that.

Edited to say, BTW Blooming Onions are not Australian. I only just heard of them and found out some people think they are from here.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2013, 07:28:09 AM by StarFaerie »

dawnfire

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #114 on: May 02, 2013, 09:07:17 PM »
No, we're born the only ones. There's one other country, Switzerland, I think.

We also don't take away the right to vote. They set up polling in jails, for instance.

As for being told what to do...well, it has the trade off of being able to put your vote in and tell who you don't like to **** off. Elections are held on weekends, so there's no excuse. But, we're not very political. We'd like our pollies to get on with governing and not grandstand or waffle on. You'd never see filibustering in Australian parliament, they'd be told to shut up and sit down.

Thanks KG, and everyone else, for information about voting matters. I imagined its being compulsory nowhere but in Australia, but learn that "definitely no so".

I've had perhaps an exaggerated notion of the Australian loathing of being rule-constrained and ordered about. Comes partly perhaps, from what I've read about the amazement felt by the British armed forces in the World Wars, at how "democratic" their Australian counterparts seemed -- privates arguing, and disputing things, with captains, etc. -- and at what highly effective fighters the Aussies were, notwithstanding.

To a question from another PP: various reasons imaginable, for not wanting to vote. I personally feel that to be allowed to vote, one should have a certain minimal level of knowledge and interest about politics and current affairs, which not everyone has. Having almost zero such knowledge and interest myself, I abstain from exercising my right to vote.

Remember, in Australia you are not constrained by party. You can vote for a minor party or independent on any government level.

And we deplore voting machines and all their works! Paper was good enough for our grandfathers, it's good enough for us!

I think Australia is very open about politics. Almost everyone has an opinion on how the government is doing and I have had political discussions with near strangers (and I'm not that political and didn't bring it up with them). It's not really polite to ask directly who someone voted for but it is just fine to discuss political topics at the dinner table and to argue it with your friends who have differing views. I think because everyone has to vote, they at least have a vague idea of what's going on and who they are annoyed at currently and what for.

Also politics is high up in our news broadcasts. If I go to CNN.com, I have to look to find US political news (maybe because it is night there, you aren't currently in election mode and have a lot more news to fill the space). But on abc.net.au and news.com.au the top stories are currently political stories and it is regularly like that.

Edited to say, BTW Blooming Onions are not Australian. I only just heard of them and found out some people think they are from here.

most of the things in outback steak house aren't traditionally Australian. (we had a chain called lonestar steakhouse and saloon with almost exactly the same menu). There isn't even a pavlova or a lamington in sight.

Julian

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #115 on: May 02, 2013, 10:20:47 PM »
Where I live the local polling booth is around 200m from my house.  A gentle stroll, and there you are.  Alas, very little usually on the cake and sausage sizzle front though.  And apparently voting for local government here isn't compulsory either.   ??? 

I got a 'please explain or pay a fine' letter after the last local government election, so I'm guessing in my state at least it's compulsory. I'm a fan of compulsory voting. You are quite free to write "get nicked" across your ballot paper so I don't see it as compulsory voting, I see it as compulsory turning up and getting your name marked off.

I have a fond memory of being on a bus all day with a group of US tourists going around our local vineyards. At the end of the day after the last vineyard, one of them asked me where would be the best place to travel to to see kangaroos. I replied "They're all around, it's just got to be the right time of day, when the sun is going down. About now would be right. See, there they are" and pointed to the 'roos hopping through the vines on the hill across the road. It's the most perfect timing of anything in my life.  :)

We saw dozens on the drive home, after not seeing a single one all day.

Nice timing on the roos!   ;D

Non-compulsory local government voting seems to be a Tasmanian thing.  I honestly didn't know until I heard on the news a few weeks ago that they want to make it compulsory.  I've been here four years, and it's the first I knew about it!

twiggy

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #116 on: May 02, 2013, 10:24:23 PM »
new question real quick:


most of the things in outback steak house aren't traditionally Australian. (we had a chain called lonestar steakhouse and saloon with almost exactly the same menu). There isn't even a pavlova or a lamington in sight.

what is traditional Australian food? Do you have a recipe that calls for things I could easily get in the US? Culture class is done, and we're having our party on Wed. (Pretty sure I aced the paper, thanks for all the insights!) I'd love to bring in some food from Australia since that was my country.
In the United States today, there is a pervasive tendency to treat children as adults, and adults as children.  The options of children are thus steadily expanded, while those of adults are progressively constricted.  The result is unruly children and childish adults.  ~Thomas Szasz

StarFaerie

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #117 on: May 02, 2013, 10:34:02 PM »
new question real quick:


most of the things in outback steak house aren't traditionally Australian. (we had a chain called lonestar steakhouse and saloon with almost exactly the same menu). There isn't even a pavlova or a lamington in sight.

what is traditional Australian food? Do you have a recipe that calls for things I could easily get in the US? Culture class is done, and we're having our party on Wed. (Pretty sure I aced the paper, thanks for all the insights!) I'd love to bring in some food from Australia since that was my country.

Pavlova would be good.It's basically a meringue cake topped with cream and sliced fruits. Or lamingtons are also awesome - sponge cakes dipped in a chocolate sauce then coated in desiccated coconut. For savoury stuff, sausage rolls and meat pies with tomato sauce would go down a treat.

Katana_Geldar

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #118 on: May 02, 2013, 11:26:38 PM »
ANZAC biscuits (NOT COOKIES) are also easy to make. Rolled oats, self raising flour, butter, sugar, coconut, bi-carb soda, butter and golden syrup. Make sure it's actually golden syrup from sugar, not corn syrup. Golden syrup has a distinctive toasty flavour quite unlike corn syrup.

Interesting fact: prior to ANZAC Day Woolworths had run out of coconut, golden syrup and rolled oats. Had to go to another supermarket so I could make them.
« Last Edit: May 02, 2013, 11:29:19 PM by Katana_Geldar »

dawnfire

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Re: Homework help, Australian culture
« Reply #119 on: May 03, 2013, 12:40:09 AM »
new question real quick:


most of the things in outback steak house aren't traditionally Australian. (we had a chain called lonestar steakhouse and saloon with almost exactly the same menu). There isn't even a pavlova or a lamington in sight.

what is traditional Australian food? Do you have a recipe that calls for things I could easily get in the US? Culture class is done, and we're having our party on Wed. (Pretty sure I aced the paper, thanks for all the insights!) I'd love to bring in some food from Australia since that was my country.

you could always bring some macadamia nuts , they are a native Australian nut, though Hawaii  grows a lot it these days.

you could bring ANZAC  biscuits,  pavlova (basically a meringue) , lamingtons (a sponges cake coated in a chocolate icing rolled in dessicated coconut). if it is an adult class you could always bring some Aussie wine or beer :)