Author Topic: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"  (Read 12502 times)

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MrsVandy

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2013, 11:53:26 PM »
My one cat hates the vet. He never bites but he does at the vets office. He has to wear a special mask when the vet checks him out. I wouldn't let anyone to pet him at the vet!




Rohanna

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #16 on: April 23, 2013, 12:45:00 AM »
The mother (or other caregiver) should without question have been watching the child , but what happened to being proactive on the part of the pet owner as well? Were they unable to speak to warn anyone or ask for help with an out of control dog? Why is it terrible parenting to not be able to control your child in public, but not equally bad to have a pet that is threatening to injure someone and you have to struggle to control it?

A dog that is snarling should be immediately removed from the situation, and if its a known problem, alternate arrangements should be made when taking it to the vet (whether that be physical bite restraints or arranging appointments with a vet so that the dog can wait outside or In a safe and private  area). Even if this was completely uncharacteristic behaviour for a sick animal, a simple "please watch out" or "I need a hand here" to a tech would have been better than simply endangering a child, regardless of whose fault it was that te child was their at all. Having a bad parent shouldn't be an excuse to allow an animal to potentially maim a child- the child is a person in their own right, and it is negligence on the part of all parties involved that the situation was allowed to carry on the way it did. I would expect even a vet receptionist to be able to step in and either handle or call the appropriate people to handle a situation with upset animals regardless of who the fault lies with.

Pet owners should be at least as responsible for the behaviour of their animals in public as parent are expected to be of their children- a small child is generally at worst an annoyance , whereas an animal can be lethal.
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*inviteseller

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #17 on: April 23, 2013, 01:04:07 AM »
When I take my kids with me to the vets, I tell them before we go in not to approach any of the animals.  This was not a dog walking down the street.  It was a dog at the dog hospital.  While the lady might have yelled a little help here, the mother wasn't paying any attention and yacking on her phone and OP was trying to get the woman's supplies.  The owner was controlling her dog, the parent was not controlling her child.  This is a place for pets, most of whom are scared, sick, hurt and I would no more as let a 4 yr old be unattended there as I would let the child play in a parking lot.  And as a parent of 2 legged and four legged kids, I vote the mother was the problem here, not the pet owner, especially because she kept her dog from eating the child and did not lose her temper and scream at anyone.

Shortylicious

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2013, 08:21:17 AM »
Where is the etiquette question or observation here? I must have missed it?????

*inviteseller

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2013, 08:28:20 AM »
How to maintain politeness in the face of supreme special snowflakiness?

OSUJillyBean

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2013, 09:39:14 AM »

A dog that is snarling should be immediately removed from the situation, and if its a known problem, alternate arrangements should be made when taking it to the vet (whether that be physical bite restraints or arranging appointments with a vet so that the dog can wait outside or In a safe and private  area). Even if this was completely uncharacteristic behaviour for a sick animal, a simple "please watch out" or "I need a hand here" to a tech would have been better than simply endangering a child, regardless of whose fault it was that te child was their at all. Having a bad parent shouldn't be an excuse to allow an animal to potentially maim a child- the child is a person in their own right, and it is negligence on the part of all parties involved that the situation was allowed to carry on the way it did. I would expect even a vet receptionist to be able to step in and either handle or call the appropriate people to handle a situation with upset animals regardless of who the fault lies with.

Pet owners should be at least as responsible for the behaviour of their animals in public as parent are expected to be of their children- a small child is generally at worst an annoyance , whereas an animal can be lethal.

The problem was the dog wasn't making a peep and our counters are so high I had no idea the child was even there until about ten - fifteen seconds before the technician came out to take the lab to the back.  By that point you bet your backside I was running around the counter to get between them because in my head the dog biting me was better than the kid getting bitten.  But the counter was long and I had gotten to them about the same time the tech called out for Mrs. Lab to bring her pooch to the exam room. 

Where is the etiquette question or observation here? I must have missed it?????

My own etiquette problem came from not laying into SS Mommy who couldn't be bothered to get off her cell phone to make sure her child wasn't becoming Kibbles & Bits.  The things I wanted to say were not eHell approved and I couldn't think clearly enough at that point to think of anything appropriate. 

Poor SS Jr. never did get the gist that the dog wasn't just playing.  I was just glad she wasn't hurt.

GoTwins

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2013, 10:22:47 AM »
That's one reason I'm glad our vet has separate entrances for dogs and cats.  You can see over to the dog side as they're separated inside by the reception desk and a wall, but they can't get to each other.

That is a fantastic idea. 

But which door do the rats, birds, ferrets, turtles, etc. use?
Ours is like this too. I always took my bunnies in the cat side. The cats were always in carriers where the dogs were on leashes.

gen xer

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2013, 10:52:41 AM »

That dog should have been muzzled.  At the very least.

Now I understand the importance of teaching kids how to behave around animals.  I have taught my own that they must ask before petting or approaching, not to harass or pester them and I would certainly remind them again to leave the animals alone at a vet's office.  It's not just about etiquette but it is for their own safety.

The mother should have been watching more closely....but that dog owner is not off the hook.  She has an unpredictable animal and if you choose to keep an unpredictable animal then you are responsible for controlling it.

TootsNYC

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2013, 10:55:31 AM »
The mother (or other caregiver) should without question have been watching the child , but what happened to being proactive on the part of the pet owner as well? Were they unable to speak to warn anyone or ask for help with an out of control dog? Why is it terrible parenting to not be able to control your child in public, but not equally bad to have a pet that is threatening to injure someone and you have to struggle to control it?


The pet owner WAS right there and was doing her best. You notice that the child did NOT get bitten, completely through the actual *ability* of the owner to control it. As for asking for help, well, the OP was one her way around the corner. Speaking? Well, the snarling dog should have been enough. And I would bet the owner wasn't completely silent.

The only thing she didn't do was say, "Lady! Get your kid away from my dog, because he's cornered here, and I can't get *him* away from her.

Piratelvr1121

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2013, 11:03:03 AM »

That dog should have been muzzled.  At the very least.

Now I understand the importance of teaching kids how to behave around animals.  I have taught my own that they must ask before petting or approaching, not to harass or pester them and I would certainly remind them again to leave the animals alone at a vet's office.  It's not just about etiquette but it is for their own safety.

The mother should have been watching more closely....but that dog owner is not off the hook.  She has an unpredictable animal and if you choose to keep an unpredictable animal then you are responsible for controlling it.

POD.  My older two are good around animals and the toddler adores all animals and having 3 cats we have had the opportunity to teach him how to interact with cats through examples, talking and the occasional time out.   
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

artk2002

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2013, 11:26:29 AM »
Where is the etiquette question or observation here? I must have missed it?????

In general, that sort of question in a thread is discouraged. If you feel that the topic or discussion is out of bounds, please report it to a moderator. Secondly, not all thread here are required to have an explicit question. As *inviteseller pointed out, the issue is how to politely deal with a dangerous situation.
Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn't do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bow lines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover. -Mark Twain

whiskeytangofoxtrot

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2013, 01:07:23 PM »
I have a strong respect for an unfamiliar animal's personal space. Not only do I ask the person's permission, I ask the animal too- just because Fluffy's "mom" is ok with it, doesn't mean that Fluffy concurs!

Outdoor Girl

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #27 on: April 23, 2013, 01:11:34 PM »
I have a strong respect for an unfamiliar animal's personal space. Not only do I ask the person's permission, I ask the animal too- just because Fluffy's "mom" is ok with it, doesn't mean that Fluffy concurs!

LOL.  Ain't that the truth.  I was in the pet store the other day and there was a store cat up on top of a pile of bags of food.  I started talking to him and got closer and the clerk let me know that he can be kind of grumpy.  But I love cats so I held my hand out for a sniff and when he didn't do anything, I started scritching him around the ears.  I went to get my food (which they didn't have) and came back for more scritches.  The clerk was impressed and said something and when I turned to talk to her, still scritching grumpy store cat, he attacked and started batting at my arm.  No claws, though, so no damage done.  It was really quite funny.
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Firecat

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #28 on: April 23, 2013, 01:41:07 PM »

That dog should have been muzzled.  At the very least.

Now I understand the importance of teaching kids how to behave around animals.  I have taught my own that they must ask before petting or approaching, not to harass or pester them and I would certainly remind them again to leave the animals alone at a vet's office.  It's not just about etiquette but it is for their own safety.

The mother should have been watching more closely....but that dog owner is not off the hook.  She has an unpredictable animal and if you choose to keep an unpredictable animal then you are responsible for controlling it.

I disagree. We have no way of knowing if this kind of thing had ever happened with the dog before. And this was a veterinary office. A place where the animals can be reasonably expected to be scared, upset, and possibly in pain and/or feeling ill.

Nope, I put this one squarely on the special snowflake mother who couldn't be bothered to keep her child under control. After all, the dog owner DID control her dog and kept the child from being bitten.

Last but not least, all animals are inherently unpredictable to some extent. Dogs that normally love everyone can be afraid/stressed/in pain in the vet's office. Or can take a dislike to someone new for no reason apparent to the owners.

Moray

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Re: "Excuse me, your child is about to be eaten by a Labrador!"
« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2013, 01:48:52 PM »
The mother (or other caregiver) should without question have been watching the child , but what happened to being proactive on the part of the pet owner as well? Were they unable to speak to warn anyone or ask for help with an out of control dog? Why is it terrible parenting to not be able to control your child in public, but not equally bad to have a pet that is threatening to injure someone and you have to struggle to control it?


The pet owner WAS right there and was doing her best. You notice that the child did NOT get bitten, completely through the actual *ability* of the owner to control it. As for asking for help, well, the OP was one her way around the corner. Speaking? Well, the snarling dog should have been enough. And I would bet the owner wasn't completely silent.

The only thing she didn't do was say, "Lady! Get your kid away from my dog, because he's cornered here, and I can't get *him* away from her.

This. Absolutely this. The owner had control of the dog.
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