General Etiquette > Life...in general

proactive in the restaurant

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Mikayla:

--- Quote from: TootsNYC on April 27, 2013, 02:32:06 PM ---
My only concern would be getting the process started for getting me my forgotten beer. How the restaurant's staff handles it is their territory, not mine.

--- End quote ---

My take on this is I always ask the waitress to get my waitress, rather than trouble her with what I need.  In fact, I'd guess about half the time she asks me anyway what I want.

I don't have a big problem with the way you handled it, but on the above, the process didn't get started for the simple reason you didn't know what kind of beer your DH ordered.  So this waitress ended up wasting her time asking you about it.

Even typing that I realized how picky that sounds.  But I think in the real world of waitressing, it may not be as ecumenical as you think.  IME, my station was my sole responsibility.  Sure, I was happy to help someone else if and when I had time, but I never saw it as an obligation.  Too much of my income depended on my tips, and that was my first priority.  So yeah, if it was the middle of lunch or dinner rush, I ignored waving arms from other stations. 

TootsNYC:

--- Quote from: pennylucy on April 28, 2013, 12:02:19 AM ---
--- Quote from: TootsNYC on April 27, 2013, 02:32:06 PM ---

As the customer, I wouldn't care about whether you got snapped at. Your problem.


--- End quote ---

That's a bit unkind. If that waitress wasn't serving your table I don't really see how it's her problem either.

--- End quote ---

I didn't mean it to be unkind. It's just a matter of fact.

My point is, *your coworker snapping at you* is not something I, as a customer,  need to worry about.

I'm not going to deny myself a pleasant meal because you *might* be afraid that your coworker would be mad at you for passing on my message or taking care of my need. I don't *need* to think that far ahead and speculate about the interaction between coworkers who are the employees of the business I am patronizing as a customer.

As a customer, I wouldn't even be IN that conversation, so how is that waiter's nastiness *my* problem?

TootsNYC:
I did it again last night. My meal arrived, and I realized I didn't have any salt for the mashed potatoes. It was a busy, crowded bar/restaurant, with a band playing. Waiters hadn't seemed all that frequently appearing, so I went back and asked for salt.

As I said, this is my issue. I don't even want to wait 20 seconds for the salt to be on its way. Since I'm that impatient, I've decided I'm going to take care of it myself. Nicely, etc., etc. But I'm going to get up if I have to, and go ask someone who can help them.

I wish I'd thought of this years ago!



--- Quote from: Mikayla on April 28, 2013, 01:19:30 PM ---
--- Quote from: TootsNYC on April 27, 2013, 02:32:06 PM ---
My only concern would be getting the process started for getting me my forgotten beer. How the restaurant's staff handles it is their territory, not mine.

--- End quote ---

...

I don't have a big problem with the way you handled it, but on the above, the process didn't get started for the simple reason you didn't know what kind of beer your DH ordered.  So this waitress ended up wasting her time asking you about it.

Even typing that I realized how picky that sounds.  But I think in the real world of waitressing, it may not be as ecumenical as you think.  IME, my station was my sole responsibility.  Sure, I was happy to help someone else if and when I had time, but I never saw it as an obligation.  Too much of my income depended on my tips, and that was my first priority.  So yeah, if it was the middle of lunch or dinner rush, I ignored waving arms from other stations.

--- End quote ---

You're right -- that wasn't the most efficient; I wish I'd asked him the beer since she seemed willing to actually get the beer and not just get my waiter. I think I only mentioned the beer so that she could tell my waiter, and my waiter could just go get the beer instead of coming to our table first to find out what was wrong.

Which is what happened.

Note: I would never, and did not, interrupt a waiter while she was serving another table. I caught her at the waiter station in the middle of the floor.

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