Author Topic: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.  (Read 4844 times)

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MOM21SON

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Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« on: April 28, 2013, 04:55:27 PM »
I swear with the way things have gone the past few weeks, I am hoping someone finally jumps out and tells me I am on Candid Camera.

I totally suck at gardening, as in I kill everything.  So, I started slow this time.  I have 4 plants in my flowerbed that I have been pampering for about 3 weeks.  They are still alive and there is hope.

My neighbor that I have lived next to for about 12 years has been following my progress and adding her 2 cents.  I just smile and nod and say how excited I am.

Well today I game home, to a new plant in my flowerbed!  Just so happens it is the same kind she has in her yard!

This is not a plant I would have chosen at all.  And, I only had room in there for 3-4 new plants, now there is room for 2-3.

Does anyone else find this odd?


CrochetFanatic

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2013, 04:57:59 PM »
Very.  She didn't ask you what you wanted, and she didn't have your permission to mess around in your garden. 

jayhawk

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2013, 05:00:35 PM »
Take it out and throw/give it away.

reflection5

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2013, 05:03:23 PM »
Yeah, I find it odd and a few other things.  Neighbor apparently took it upon herself to "help things along" on your property in your garden.  Not cool.  She should have asked and given you the opportunity to answer.

I'd remove that plant/flower, throw it away, proceed with my garden as I want it to be.  If she asks "what happened to (x plant)" I'd say, "I don't care for (xplant).  I'm coming along okay on my own.  Hope things turn out well - spring is here!"  I would not thank her.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #4 on: April 28, 2013, 05:04:32 PM »
I agree. I'd remove tin before she gets a chance to ask how you liked her suprise. If you've already removed it up you can say you didn't know she did it and that you already have plans to add more plants later.

Mopsy428

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #5 on: April 28, 2013, 05:05:34 PM »
Not only is it odd, but she's trespassing on your property. I'd ask her if she's the one who planted it. Then I'd ask her not to do it again and uproot the flower.

rose red

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2013, 05:27:39 PM »
I wouldn't say anything.  If she says anything, I would tell her I didn't know where that plant came from, but it wasn't part my plans so I got rid of it.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2013, 05:29:18 PM by rose red »

MOM21SON

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2013, 05:28:59 PM »
And, I know this sounds petty, but I looked forward to watering everyday.  I found it very relaxing and enjoyed the silence.  My watering for the day has already been done. :(

Jones

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2013, 05:30:00 PM »
I'd just uproot it. Don't care who put it there, don't want it, just get rid of it. If she says something you can say that, since you hadn't planted it and didn't want it, it was the same as a weed.

Good luck with your flower bed; I have pulled up grass and planted snapdragons this spring, my first time in years trying to grow something myself (not generally green-thumbed).

JoieGirl7

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2013, 05:32:34 PM »
I really don't think that etiquuette wise its a good idea to pretend that you didn't know who put the plant there and then throw it out,  In fact, that seem pretty vindictive,

Also, a neighbor of 12 years who you know and are on good terms with is not a trespasser.

Having a good neighbor is a great thing even if she pkants something in your flower bed. 

It's just a plant for crying out loud!  It's not permanent.  She didn't graffiti up the garage!

This has to be handled politely and with grace.

"Hey, Alice!  Did you plant this in my garden?!  I thought it sprung up awfully fast!  I appreciate the gesture but its really not my style.  Maybe we could plant it somewhere else or you could take it back,  My garden is my own little domain and I only have enough attention for the things I have planted there.   Again, I appreciate the thought, but I am kind of terrotorial about my little domain.  What should we do with this new guy here?"

There really is no reason to be unfriendly.  She overstepped.  But, its a bad idea to turn her into an enemy because of it.

MOM21SON

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #10 on: April 28, 2013, 05:35:23 PM »
I really don't think that etiquuette wise its a good idea to pretend that you didn't know who put the plant there and then throw it out,  In fact, that seem pretty vindictive,

Also, a neighbor of 12 years who you know and are on good terms with is not a trespasser.

Having a good neighbor is a great thing even if she pkants something in your flower bed. 

It's just a plant for crying out loud!  It's not permanent.  She didn't graffiti up the garage!

This has to be handled politely and with grace.

"Hey, Alice!  Did you plant this in my garden?!  I thought it sprung up awfully fast!  I appreciate the gesture but its really not my style.  Maybe we could plant it somewhere else or you could take it back,  My garden is my own little domain and I only have enough attention for the things I have planted there.   Again, I appreciate the thought, but I am kind of terrotorial about my little domain.  What should we do with this new guy here?"

There really is no reason to be unfriendly.  She overstepped.  But, its a bad idea to turn her into an enemy because of it.

No, I don't plan on creating a uproar over it.  Nor do I think I implied I would.  Yes it is a plant that I did not plant in my flowerbed.

JoieGirl7

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #11 on: April 28, 2013, 05:43:49 PM »
I really don't think that etiquuette wise its a good idea to pretend that you didn't know who put the plant there and then throw it out,  In fact, that seem pretty vindictive,

Also, a neighbor of 12 years who you know and are on good terms with is not a trespasser.

Having a good neighbor is a great thing even if she pkants something in your flower bed. 

It's just a plant for crying out loud!  It's not permanent.  She didn't graffiti up the garage!

This has to be handled politely and with grace.

"Hey, Alice!  Did you plant this in my garden?!  I thought it sprung up awfully fast!  I appreciate the gesture but its really not my style.  Maybe we could plant it somewhere else or you could take it back,  My garden is my own little domain and I only have enough attention for the things I have planted there.   Again, I appreciate the thought, but I am kind of terrotorial about my little domain.  What should we do with this new guy here?"

There really is no reason to be unfriendly.  She overstepped.  But, its a bad idea to turn her into an enemy because of it.


No, I don't plan on creating a uproar over it.  Nor do I think I implied I would.  Yes it is a plant that I did not plant in my flowerbed.


I didn't think you would but some of the suggestions you have gotten come awfully close to retaliatory rudeness.  It is not possible to sidestep the issue and think that there will be no social consequences.

Yes, it was weird of her to do that, but I don't think she meant it in a mean or harrssing way.

Outdoor Girl

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #12 on: April 28, 2013, 05:45:19 PM »
I love gardening.  I'm slowly turning my front 'lawn' into all garden.  I'm sure it is driving some of my neighbours nuts that it is taking so long.  If I were to come out to my garden and found a plant I did not plant and did not want, I would dig it up and plant it in a pot.  I would then set it out in a conspicuous spot and continue to take care of it so it would live.

That way, if the neighbour put it in, she will hopefully ask about it.  You can let her know at that time, 'Oh, I wondered where that came from!  {said brightly}  Unfortunately, it doesn't fit in with the plan I have for the garden.  Would you like it back or shall I give it to someone else who might have room for it?'

We gardeners do love to share our plants when they have to be split.  But we generally ASK if someone wants it and don't generally plant them without the homeowner's knowledge.

I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

CaffeineKatie

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #13 on: April 28, 2013, 05:55:24 PM »
Oh that would freak me out!  I am a longtime addicted gardener, forced to start over again (my yard is bare dirt) due to a natural disaster and I STILL wouldn't want someone to plant a "gift" in my yard!  Leave it on the doorstep--sure.  Offer starts, cuttings, divisions--absolutely.  Dig in my dirt--no way!  I'd pot it back up and leave it near the sidewalk--she probably meant well, so she should have a chance to reclaim it and hopefully get the message.

DottyG

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Re: Planting stuff in your neighbors flower bed.
« Reply #14 on: April 28, 2013, 05:59:44 PM »
I can see Audrey's point. I think she has the right solution that works for both sides but doesn't cause tension in a good relationship.