Etiquette School is in session! > "I'm afraid that won't be possible."

Move to the worst seat on the plane so we can sit together!

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quiescent:
Last time I flew I was called to desk before boarding to be told that a man wanted to 'give' me his 'upgraded' seat so he sit with his kid. this was a 10hr flight ant the 'upgraded' (as the flight attendent put it ) was a middle row seat which is obviously the most unconmfortable seat for a long flight. It had extra leg room making it 'upgraded'. Now obviously they had gone thru the manifest to find single people traveling alone to try and find these people seats together since after I said 'no' some other passengers traveling alone were called.

Sitting with other travelers isnt the only reason people select theri seats. I selected my window seat in a specific are of he plane to make my journey as compfortable as possible and I resented being picked out to be asked to move to a seat I didn't want just becauseI was a single passenger and some other people wanted to sit together !

I should add this wasn't a youg kid, but a teen

Outdoor Girl:
I don't have a problem being asked.  If the seat is equivalent or better to the one I'm in, I'd be happy to switch.  But asking me to switch out of my aisle seat for a middle or even a window?  Not going to happen.  Switching to another aisle seat that isn't right at the back of the plane?  I'd probably agree.  But if it is in the last 10 rows, I'll probably say no - I have severe motion sickness and being at the back of the plane makes it worse.  I try to get within a few rows of the wing or further forward to alleviate the motion sickness.  I do take meds for it but if it is a rough flight, they are only so effective.

Annoyed in America:

--- Quote from: Outdoor Girl on November 09, 2013, 03:32:20 PM ---I don't have a problem being asked.  If the seat is equivalent or better to the one I'm in, I'd be happy to switch.  But asking me to switch out of my aisle seat for a middle or even a window?  Not going to happen.  Switching to another aisle seat that isn't right at the back of the plane?  I'd probably agree.  But if it is in the last 10 rows, I'll probably say no - I have severe motion sickness and being at the back of the plane makes it worse.  I try to get within a few rows of the wing or further forward to alleviate the motion sickness.  I do take meds for it but if it is a rough flight, they are only so effective.

--- End quote ---

I, too, have severe motion sickness.  The first thing I do when I board is look for the barf bag.  If DH and I are separated I explain to my neighbor and they always seek out my DH to switch.  No one wants to sit near the vomitmeister! 

One time on an international flight they (FA) wanted to switch and put me in the bulkhead seats.  I told them my still healing arm would prohibit me from being strong enough to manage the door.  They then put me in business class for the 12 hour flight.  I did not complain! 

My worst flight was sitting next to a 300 pound man who overflowed into my seat (4 hour trip).  My back was sore for two days after from trying to position myself away from him. Ugh!

Funniest trip was when I sat next to a nervous man who drank and drank to ease his fear.  He kept talking and getting louder and louder.  He wasn't offensive, other than loud talking and was actually a bit amusing, but I think I was the only one amused.  I had several people approach me at baggage claim to complain and comment on his drunken behavior.  These people were actually more offensive than the drunken guy, in my mind.

StuffedGrapeLeaves:

--- Quote from: cass2591 on October 04, 2013, 10:11:00 PM ---My point was the OP of that post shouldn't have to prove she bought the seat as long as she has the boarding pass. Sure, passengers can be jerks and decide who/what is proper for a seat, but flight attendants and gate agents should know if that a ticket has been purchased if there's a boarding pass, no questions asked. That's what I don't understand.

And Dragons 8, I don't understand what you mean. If you buy a seat, you get it. Unless you're bumped but that's a whole different story.

--- End quote ---

Sorry, Cass, I just saw this.  I agree that a boarding pass would normally be enough, but there have been occasions where the person would just assume that we didn't purchase a seat for DS when he was under two, and would continue to insist that we need to put the baby on our laps.  We found that during those times saying the words "we paid for this seat and here's a receipt" and showing them the receipt gets them to stop insisting and to reevaluate the original assumption faster than just trying to show them a boarding pass.  I think seeing the actual dollar amount seems to get through faster than just a seat number. 

doodlemor:

--- Quote from: StuffedGrapeLeaves on January 05, 2014, 08:24:55 AM ---
Sorry, Cass, I just saw this.  I agree that a boarding pass would normally be enough, but there have been occasions where the person would just assume that we didn't purchase a seat for DS when he was under two, and would continue to insist that we need to put the baby on our laps.  We found that during those times saying the words "we paid for this seat and here's a receipt" and showing them the receipt gets them to stop insisting and to reevaluate the original assumption faster than just trying to show them a boarding pass.  I think seeing the actual dollar amount seems to get through faster than just a seat number.

--- End quote ---

The very first time that I ever flew was on People Express, and the plane was quite full.  I was asked by the flight attendant to put my 'baby" on my lap.  I answered "She is three years old, and has paid for her ticket."   That was the end of the exchange, and the FA went on down the aisle looking for other seats to squeeze more people on to the plane.

[It's no wonder that the plane was filled to capacity.  The price for a nonstop flight from Buffalo to Sarasota was $75.]

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