Author Topic: Solicitations at work - how to word email to HR or just let it pass??  (Read 2832 times)

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dawbs

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Re: Solicitations at work - how to word email to HR or just let it pass??
« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2013, 05:02:50 PM »
You may find, if you find a clear way to say 'no" (and someone above mentioned the thing like "I'm sorry, but I don't ever do donations at work--it can get messy.  I'm sure you understand"; I run with that one),  you may find that more people feel comfortable saying 'no'.
And culture in the corp. can change.

Of course, that is a risky move--I would and have made that move at jobs; I've made the opposite move, even though it grated me, for careers.

lilfox

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Re: Solicitations at work - how to word email to HR or just let it pass??
« Reply #16 on: April 30, 2013, 05:04:07 PM »
Sounds like OP's workplace is the root of the expression, "I gave at the office."

I've never worked in an environment as aggressive about fund-raising/participation as that, it sounds painful.  Agree with the PPs to at most send a generic "What's the policy?" question to HR rather than a complaint.  It's possible the policy is strict and people are abusing it, which is something HR should know and your email may trigger an inquiry anyway.  It's also possible that the policy is lax, in which case it's up to each person to say no or opt out.  Personally, I'd be opting out of every solicitation except for the occasional potluck or a close coworker's event.  Early on at my company, I made the mistake of shelling out $20 for a retirement party of a senior manager (who I barely knew) and received exactly 3 bite-sized appetizers and a cup of water for my donation.  Corporate culture should not drain your bank account.

I would suggest, though, if you have bought anything from anyone and not received your goods, a politely worded request on the "status of my purchase and expected delivery date" is a must.  And repeat twice a week or so until you get a refund or your stuff.  Drop by in person and don't leave without an acceptable response.  Do NOT let someone just take your money for nothing.  That's theft.

MyFamily

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Re: Solicitations at work - how to word email to HR or just let it pass??
« Reply #17 on: April 30, 2013, 05:07:57 PM »
I may have missed someone pointing this out, but obviously, you don't have to participate in everything - you just gave money towards a birthday party to someone who doesn't even give towards other people's gifts and your co-workers still did the normal birthday stuff for her!  If you see that your coworkers don't really like this person who doesn't give towards other's gifts, that is a message, but if they treat her just fine, then I think you have all the proof you need that you don't need to do this.


"The test of good manners is to be patient with bad ones" - Solomon ibn Gabirol

Margo

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I agree with PPs that sending the letter would be a mistake.

I also agree that you don't need to participate. My response would depend on how the approaches are made:

- general e-mail to all staff - ignore, unless it is an official request
- direct mail or personal request - polite, friendly "no thanks" 
- collection for a birthday or other life event - I would try to contribute if you can - fitting in with the culture of the workplace is usually a good idea. - if the person making the collection is requesting a specific amount and this is too expensive, then it might be worth raising it informally with co-workers to mention you're finding it's pretty expensive, and suggest perhaps a cap on how much is suqgested, or a change to a 'give what you want'.

You don't have to give any explanation for not participating, but if you are asked, and feel that some explanation is needed or the sake of good relations with co-workers I would stick to something vague "It's not in my budget at present" or "I'm already committed to supporting my daughter/neighbour/neice's troop" or something similar - that way, you are not coming across as critical of the individual collecting/selling, or of the culture of asking at work, but you can chose not to contribute to things you don't want to.

I would not involve HR unless you find yourself in a situation where you are being bullied or pressured if you don't join in. It seems like over kill to go straight to HR without first seeing whether a polite 'no thanks' will work.

In the case of the person you bought something from, I would send them a mail setting out what you ordered, when you ordered it, and when you understood you would be receiving your items. Ask them to confirm when you will get your items and then chase them again on that date if they haven't arrived. If the delay is excessive, you could request a refund instead.

If nothing happens, check the office manual (if there is one)  to see what policies there are.  Depending on what it says, you could ask HR to mediate between you and the co-worker who sold you the stuff to sort out a refund or timescale for your good to be provided, but unless she was selling on behalf of the company this would appear to be a private matter between you and her, not the company's responsibility to resolve.

If selling at work is against the company policy then you can report it to HR as a breach of policy but you may also be in breach for having bought from her, so check the policy first.

In my office, it's very common for people to do sponsored events, or to let everyone know that their child is doing a sponsored event, or to offer things for sale, or in return for a charity donation and there are always collections for life events such as the birth or adoption of a child, retirement, weddings and milestone birthdays - but these are all completely voluntary.Most people will contribute to some things bit not necessarily to everything, and no-one is pressured or 'chased' to contribute.

MrTango

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I would send an email to HR, but I wouldn't mention any specifics.  Instead, I would ask them to please clarify the company's policy regarding soliciting donations and sales.

Momiitz

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Sounds like OP's workplace is the root of the expression, "I gave at the office."

I've never worked in an environment as aggressive about fund-raising/participation as that, it sounds painful.  Agree with the PPs to at most send a generic "What's the policy?" question to HR rather than a complaint.  It's possible the policy is strict and people are abusing it, which is something HR should know and your email may trigger an inquiry anyway.  It's also possible that the policy is lax, in which case it's up to each person to say no or opt out.  Personally, I'd be opting out of every solicitation except for the occasional potluck or a close coworker's event.  Early on at my company, I made the mistake of shelling out $20 for a retirement party of a senior manager (who I barely knew) and received exactly 3 bite-sized appetizers and a cup of water for my donation.  Corporate culture should not drain your bank account.

I would suggest, though, if you have bought anything from anyone and not received your goods, a politely worded request on the "status of my purchase and expected delivery date" is a must.  And repeat twice a week or so until you get a refund or your stuff.  Drop by in person and don't leave without an acceptable response.  Do NOT let someone just take your money for nothing.  That's theft.

I agree with this completely. I could not have said it better myself.  Please ask about your order. Don't be a door mat. You paid for a product. You need to either receive it or get a refund. And say to yourself never again.

That Anime Chick

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Delete the entire letter and start practicing "It's not in my budget." Keep repeating as often as needed. I haven't given to the semi-mandatory company fundraiser for a national charity for the last several years due to several financial issues. This works for me, and people know better than to continue asking after I've said no the first time.
 
You might get people asking why, don't JADE. Just keep repeating.
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