Author Topic: Opinions on school uniforms  (Read 12039 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

fountainof

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 668
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #120 on: April 19, 2014, 05:12:53 PM »
In my area they only have uniforms for private school.  I probably wouldn't want to wear them as they don't look that comfortable.

I don't see how they equalize people though.  People can tell by things like your shoes, your back pack, your outer wear if you have designer brands.  Also, even without make up, done up hair there will be good looking kids and those not so much.  I actually think uniforms could make it harder for kids to express themselves as that is a big part of growing up and figuring out who you are and gain confidence.

WolfWay

  • They burnt down my house... They ate my tailor!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2578
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #121 on: April 22, 2014, 12:32:37 AM »
In my area they only have uniforms for private school.  I probably wouldn't want to wear them as they don't look that comfortable.

I don't see how they equalize people though.  People can tell by things like your shoes, your back pack, your outer wear if you have designer brands.  Also, even without make up, done up hair there will be good looking kids and those not so much.  I actually think uniforms could make it harder for kids to express themselves as that is a big part of growing up and figuring out who you are and gain confidence.
All the schools in South Africa have government approved uniform supply stores. This includes shoes, and our outer wear is also part of the uniform (jerseys/jumpers, blazers, socks, stockings, hats, sports wear). You can also get things like wooly hats, scarves and trenchcoats as part of the uniform.

You aren't told "you need black pants and a longsleeved white shirt", you are told "You will go to XX shop and get the following for ABC school". When you go to buy the uniforms, they ask which school its for (sometimes they ask for an official letter head from the school to make sure it's a legitimate request) and direct you to the appropriate set of uniforms.

You can't buy designer brand items and use those, you will be forced to replace them with sanctioned pieces. The only thing you can possibly personalise with a branded item is probably your backpack and maybe your pencil case, but that's about all.

Also for my school (and many others near mine), no makeup/jewelry was allowed, and hair styles were strictly enfored. The most you could do is maybe roll up your skirt at the waist to shorten it, and undo a top collar button and wear your school tie askew, even then you could get detention for modifying the uniform by wearing it incorrectly. You could get detention for not wearing your blazer over your jumper if you left the school grounds dressed like that.
It's best to love your family as you would a Siberian Tiger - from a distance, preferably separated by bars . -- Pearls Before Swine (16-May-2009)

Jones

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2670
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #122 on: April 22, 2014, 12:40:27 AM »
That sounds...stifling, to me. A little extreme, though I'm sure if it's culturally accepted it's fine; such detailed rules wouldn't fly in my area.

Katana_Geldar

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1971
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #123 on: April 22, 2014, 12:47:06 AM »
Having a uniform isn't about expressing yourself, it's about being part of something. By wearing the uniform you represent your school in public in a very recognisable way, this is why they crack down on things like kids smoking in uniform outside of school hours. It's how schools get a reputation, good and bad, and influences how parents choose schools for their children.

Children have many, many ways to express their individuality, I can't see how a uniform stops that. And most children don't buy their own clothes anyway or have limited choice on what their parents buy for them.

WolfWay

  • They burnt down my house... They ate my tailor!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2578
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #124 on: April 22, 2014, 02:17:26 AM »
That sounds...stifling, to me. A little extreme, though I'm sure if it's culturally accepted it's fine; such detailed rules wouldn't fly in my area.

It depends what you've grown up with. I honestly hadn't thought about how restrictive my school was until I started writing out all the rules in an earlier post in this thread. It never struck me as restrictive at the time. When it's how you've always been educated and everyone else you know is in the same boat, it doesn't seem wierd.
It's best to love your family as you would a Siberian Tiger - from a distance, preferably separated by bars . -- Pearls Before Swine (16-May-2009)

CakeEater

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2883
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #125 on: April 22, 2014, 03:05:12 AM »
That sounds...stifling, to me. A little extreme, though I'm sure if it's culturally accepted it's fine; such detailed rules wouldn't fly in my area.

It depends what you've grown up with. I honestly hadn't thought about how restrictive my school was until I started writing out all the rules in an earlier post in this thread. It never struck me as restrictive at the time. When it's how you've always been educated and everyone else you know is in the same boat, it doesn't seem wierd.

My high school had its 'speech night' (kind of like a graduation, but all grades are involved - awards given out for subject areas for each grade and the year 12s walked up on stage - but nothing like what I'm imagining a US graduation to be) about 2 weeks after the year 12s finished officially, and a boy had dyed his hair red in those two weeks. Not fire engine red, just a natural red, but not his natural colour, which was blonde, I think. He wasn't allowed up on stage, because part of the uniform policy was hair to remain undyed.

Hair longer than collar length on girls had to be tied up, and boys' wasn't to reach collar length. Plain black, white or brown hair ties. Boys' socks to be pulled up Hats on when outside, and when travelling to and from school. One pair of sleepers or studs allowed in girls' ears, and none in boys'. No other jewellery allowed apart from a watch. That's actually a pretty standard rule even in state schools here.

At boarding schools near me, the students have to wear their uniforms if they leave the school grounds even on the weekends. Shopping centres on Saturday are full of boarders in school uniforms. One school I taught at insisted that the kids wear their full uniform or none of it outside the school. So if they dropped into the shopping centre after school, they couldn't take their black lace up shoes off and wear slip ons if they had their school clothes on.

I love it. I loved wearing a uniform - I was proud to be associated with my school, even though the uniform was pretty ugly. I liked knowing what to wear every day - it would have been agonising for me to choose clothes for school.

There's 18 other hours in the day to express yourself with your appearance - I can't see why kids need to do that during the 6 hours they're at school.

sammycat

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 6214
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #126 on: April 22, 2014, 03:24:36 AM »
I love it. I loved wearing a uniform - I was proud to be associated with my school, even though the uniform was pretty ugly. I liked knowing what to wear every day - it would have been agonising for me to choose clothes for school.

There's 18 other hours in the day to express yourself with your appearance - I can't see why kids need to do that during the 6 hours they're at school.

I so agree! I used to hate mufti day as I often used to be slightly out of sync with what a lot of the other girls wore, so having to go through that every day would've been a nightmare. (Most girls wore jeans in winter mufti days. As a teenager I hated wearing jeans and never really started wearing them until  I was adult, so always felt self conscious in my cotton pants).

Throwing on my uniform each day just made life so much easier.

paintpots

  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • Posts: 87
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #127 on: April 22, 2014, 05:30:07 AM »
Ditto- I remember the panic that set in the night before own clothes day!

jilly

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 344
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #128 on: April 22, 2014, 06:07:03 AM »
My school uniforms weren't as strict as some, they were white blouse/shirt, navy or black trousers / skirt, school sweatshirt and a school tie. If you didn't want to wear the school sweatshirt in the winter you could wear something under your shirt to keep warm so long as it didn't show. I personally hated the school sweatshirt so I had a tight white jumper I wore under my blouse.
Skirts had a minimum length of the top of your knee but that was the only style restriction. Even if parents wanted you to wear a traditional style pleated knee length skirt there were a couple of shops selling school uniforms so they weren't too expensive.
Shoes had to be closed toe and heel and black, dark brown or navy.
There were restrictions on jewlery too. All rules applied equally to boys and girls :)
I think there was much more individual style in uniform than on mufti day. On mufti day everyone wore blue jeans a t-shirt and trainers but on uniform days there was a variety some girls preferred trousers some knee length skirts, one year I had a button through maxi skirt, there are a variety of styles of white shirt too.
It also taught you how to dress for work as I can't think of any job that doesn't at least have a dress code of some sort.

Ereine

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1129
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #129 on: April 23, 2014, 12:51:29 AM »
I love it. I loved wearing a uniform - I was proud to be associated with my school, even though the uniform was pretty ugly. I liked knowing what to wear every day - it would have been agonising for me to choose clothes for school.

There's 18 other hours in the day to express yourself with your appearance - I can't see why kids need to do that during the 6 hours they're at school.

I think that here there's less emphasis on being part of something here, schools are for learning things, not for building teams. Schools are still pretty equal, though unfortunately it's changing and a good school is one that offers special programs or languages or for high schools, one that has good test scores.

I do think that my punk rocker friends would have had hard time expressing their personalities with the strictest uniform rules, maybe they could have worn wigs to school. And the no long hair on boys rule seems a bit bizarre.

katycoo

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3853
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #130 on: April 23, 2014, 01:28:56 AM »
I think that here there's less emphasis on being part of something here, schools are for learning things, not for building teams. Schools are still pretty equal, though unfortunately it's changing and a good school is one that offers special programs or languages or for high schools, one that has good test scores.

I believe there's evidence that students tend to learn better when part of a team.

WolfWay

  • They burnt down my house... They ate my tailor!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2578
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #131 on: April 23, 2014, 02:44:32 AM »
And the no long hair on boys rule seems a bit bizarre.
It's a neatness thing. It's very hard to look messy with a buzzcut or very short hair, whilst long hair can look unwashed and unkempt if you don't brush it or style it. It's the same reason that girls hair at my school had to be tied up once it was long enough to touch your collar. And if you had bangs, they had to be kept back off your face (alice band / clips) once it was longer than your eyebrows. I also forgot another restriction we had: the hair clips, hairties and alicebands had to be black or blue, no other colours.
It's best to love your family as you would a Siberian Tiger - from a distance, preferably separated by bars . -- Pearls Before Swine (16-May-2009)

Cherry91

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 738
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #132 on: April 23, 2014, 06:48:43 AM »
I'm from the UK, where uniforms are almost entirely a thing, but I've done the full circuit from the school where as long as you were wearing a school polo shirt they'd leave you alone, to a private catholic school with the full uniform - blazer, jumper, skirt that had to be knee length (they'd make you kneel on the ground and if your skirt didn't touch the ground you'd be in trouble. All it did was teach us how to roll a skirt in such a way that you could pull it to full length in under 5 seconds), etc. You had to ask the teacher's permission to remove your blazer, even in the summer, and some of the teachers would make you suffer for ages before they gav you permission.

Then I went to a Sixth Form with no uniform whatsoever and it was glorious. I went pretty mad with the freedom and dyed my hair about 10 times in two years.

jilly

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 344
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #133 on: April 23, 2014, 07:13:04 AM »
Then I went to a Sixth Form with no uniform whatsoever and it was glorious. I went pretty mad with the freedom and dyed my hair about 10 times in two years.

I went to a tech college and was excited to ditch the uniform, but I chose engineering. Health and safety made for even tighter restrictions on hair and jewellery then wearing overalls all day :(  hair dye was my only outlet, I even used hair mascara for daily changes!

Ereine

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1129
Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #134 on: April 23, 2014, 12:00:53 PM »
I think that here there's less emphasis on being part of something here, schools are for learning things, not for building teams. Schools are still pretty equal, though unfortunately it's changing and a good school is one that offers special programs or languages or for high schools, one that has good test scores.

I believe there's evidence that students tend to learn better when part of a team.

Is that for smaller teams or the whole school? I think there's probably too much emphasis on learning facts and measurable skills and not enough on interpersonal relationships and teamwork and things like that (though our PISA results show that we're doing at least something right). Being neat and formal doesn't seem to be much of a priority.