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Opinions on school uniforms

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Piratelvr1121:
As a kid who constantly got bullied about my wardrobe growing up (K-Mart Kid was an insult I heard often even though I didn't have a single article of clothing from there) I often begged my parents to enroll me in one of the parochial schools.  I loved the idea of  going to a private school with the uniforms and everyone wearing the same thing. 

My mother liked to dress me like a mini 40 year old. Basically like her.  Add in a short hairstyle that was very popular amongst 40 year old women in the  90's and I got teased a LOT for my style in middle school. 

But they wouldn't.  Character building, or something. 

MommyPenguin:
I didn't have to wear a uniform (only private school kids did), and wished I had!  I hated the whole clothing thing, trying to understand fashion, the treatment kids got from other kids, etc.  Of course, I've heard people say that since they go to a school with uniforms, kids have to find another way to choose who the fashionable kids are and who aren't, so they'll go with who pays their tuition versus who is there on a scholarship/voucher (if it's private school) or what-not.  But I guess kids left to their own devices in large groups always try to find a way of sorting themselves into groups/cliques.  I like the look of uniforms in general, too, although my neighbor went to a private school with a uniform that was just boring and not very cute or flattering at all, poor thing.

camlan:
I went to both public schools and Catholic schools growing up in the US. No uniform in the public schools, uniforms in the Catholic schools.

I liked the uniform. Easy and simple to get dressed in the morning. No one was judged by their clothing. And in the long run, it's probably cheaper, as you don't need nearly as much clothing. I think I had one jumper and five shirts in high school--that's all I wore for two years. Plus so many pairs of navy blue knee socks that they didn't all wear out until after I graduated college.

There's nothing wrong with wearing your own clothes to school. But uniforms can remove some of the status of the students and level the playing field a little.

There's also the psychological aspects of a uniform. You put a uniform on to do a certain job. For students, the uniform means that they are there to learn. You are part of a group, all doing the same thing. It can help bonding in some ways.

camlan:

--- Quote from: MommyPenguin on May 01, 2013, 08:27:53 PM ---I didn't have to wear a uniform (only private school kids did), and wished I had!  I hated the whole clothing thing, trying to understand fashion, the treatment kids got from other kids, etc.  Of course, I've heard people say that since they go to a school with uniforms, kids have to find another way to choose who the fashionable kids are and who aren't, so they'll go with who pays their tuition versus who is there on a scholarship/voucher (if it's private school) or what-not.  But I guess kids left to their own devices in large groups always try to find a way of sorting themselves into groups/cliques.  I like the look of uniforms in general, too, although my neighbor went to a private school with a uniform that was just boring and not very cute or flattering at all, poor thing.

--- End quote ---

Even in Catholic school, with the nuns breathing down our backs, people found ways to differentiate. Different hair styles. Colored ribbons. How they wore their name tags. Folding down the tops of their socks.

You'd be surprised at how kids can alter a seemingly identical uniform.

Sharnita:
As somebody who has taught with and without them - emphayic yes. I haye having to deal with shirts imploring society to "Free Boosie" or homemade RIP gear yhay may or may not memorialize a gang member. That says nothing of the MILF sweatshirt, cleavage to the belt line, teasing the kids who can't afford brand name clothes ...

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