Author Topic: Opinions on school uniforms  (Read 9852 times)

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lowspark

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #105 on: April 08, 2014, 02:43:52 PM »
Yeah. My son is tall and thin and always has been so the waste band was fine. In high school, he only ended up uniformed for two years now that I think of it. Three years in middle school and I purposely bought the shirts too big.

I know, I know. I'm cheap and it was awful to do that. But a) my son didn't really care at all and b) his clothes (white shirt required in middle school!) were pretty much stained within the first few weeks anyway.

jedikaiti

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #106 on: April 08, 2014, 03:13:16 PM »
Just wanted to add - and it might have been posted earlier in this thread - I really saw no stigma from people wearing second hand uniforms.  Most people who had older siblings wore hand me downs, even if the family was well off, and new uniforms were NOT cool so no-one was jealous!

My MIL told me that older clothes had more status than newer clothes.  It meant you had been attending the school for a long time.  They were softer, too.  She said by her senior year she had to be very careful of her pants at the leg crease because they were thread-bare.  Her mother had bought her new ones but she didn't want to wear them.

In my school, the status was in the material - the older hand-me-down skirts were a heavier, nicer fabric, whereas the newer ones were brighter colors but a cheaper polyester. But it wasn't so much status as maybe a bit of envy.
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katycoo

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #107 on: April 08, 2014, 10:00:01 PM »
I like the idea of a school uniform, but in practice you still have the same types of "classism".  We have black, white, or school color polo style shirts, khaki, black, or navy trousers/shorts that reach the knee.  Some kids have the more expensive brands that you can tell are expensive even without logos (which are banned).  Other students do get uniforms at Goodwill or Wal-Mart and it shows just as much.  You still get just as much teasing and bullying about clothing as you did before uniforms.

I don't dispute your experience, but this certainly didn't happen in practice at my school.

kherbert05

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #108 on: April 08, 2014, 10:14:32 PM »


As soon as you specify a specific brand/vendor that turns into a Uniform and either under Texas law or Title I the district now has to supply it to everyone on free or reduced.

Does this mean that any child in a Texas school who has to wear a specific uniform gets it all for free? Apologies if I'm interpreting this incorrectly, but I'm wondering how this can be financially feasible for a school/district/state?
Uniforms that are very specific - like have logos or having to be a specific vendor/brand - would have to be provided at least to Title I kids (qualify for free or reduced lunch because their family is below or close to poverty level).


In public (State run) schools in Texas are free for the student. Textbooks are paid for by the state, unless the district gets an unapproved textbook for some reason then the district has to pay for it they can't charge students.


Example our state purchased science books are years out of date - as in the state standards have changed at least 2 if not 3 times since they were adopted. Our campus voted to buy a digital curriculum developed by Rice University to meet the current standards. We paid for that out of campus funds. We couldn't charge the kids.


We are having a field trip. We can sell Field Trip T-shirts, because they are optional*. We can even ask parents to pay a fee for admission (we are going to the Zoo but didn't apply early enough to get one of the Title I scholarships), but in our case our PTO pays the fee. But if a child is on free or reduced, the parent doesn't have to pay the admission fee and the school is required to pay for the child's admission (we get federal funds to do that).


*I had several kids who's parents couldn't afford the T-shirts, so I paid for them so the kids will have them on the day of our trip.
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WolfWay

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #109 on: April 09, 2014, 05:33:00 AM »
I like the idea of a school uniform, but in practice you still have the same types of "classism".  We have black, white, or school color polo style shirts, khaki, black, or navy trousers/shorts that reach the knee.  Some kids have the more expensive brands that you can tell are expensive even without logos (which are banned).  Other students do get uniforms at Goodwill or Wal-Mart and it shows just as much.  You still get just as much teasing and bullying about clothing as you did before uniforms.

I don't dispute your experience, but this certainly didn't happen in practice at my school.
Fortunately at my school, there was only one official uniform supplier you could use so everyone had to wear the same quality grade of uniform (the school also had a second-hand supply of uniforms at a discount that were either donated to the school by leaving students or sold back to the school by leaving students at a discount, but the rules about how badly worn or damaged the uniform was allowed to be were strict, so you couldn't get away with an old uniform for too long).  It's hard to form visually obvious cliques when you are all forced to dress alike in very strict limits of variability for accessorising or personalizing.

At most, we had the smart/geeky girls, the sporty girls and the religious girls, but we were defined by our interests and extramural activities, not our appearence. I really don't remember anything in the way of people being picked on for any aspects of their clothing. I'm sure bullying must have happened but to be honest, I can't remember any obvious instances of it (and I was a fat geeky girl who loved the library and chess club, so you think I'd have been a prime target for that sort of thing). Mind you, I suck at picking up social clues, so it's possible people were trying to pick on me, but I was too dumb to realise it.  ::)
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sammycat

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #110 on: April 09, 2014, 05:41:46 AM »
Fortunately at my school, there was only one official uniform supplier you could use so everyone had to wear the same quality grade of uniform (the school also had a second-hand supply of uniforms at a discount that were either donated to the school by leaving students or sold back to the school by leaving students at a discount, but the rules about how badly worn or damaged the uniform was allowed to be were strict, so you couldn't get away with an old uniform for too long).  It's hard to form visually obvious cliques when you are all forced to dress alike in very strict limits of variability for accessorising or personalizing.

I concur. This is the situation with every school in my area and also the ones I attended.

perpetua

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #111 on: April 09, 2014, 06:56:02 AM »
I like the idea of a school uniform, but in practice you still have the same types of "classism".  We have black, white, or school color polo style shirts, khaki, black, or navy trousers/shorts that reach the knee.  Some kids have the more expensive brands that you can tell are expensive even without logos (which are banned).  Other students do get uniforms at Goodwill or Wal-Mart and it shows just as much.  You still get just as much teasing and bullying about clothing as you did before uniforms.

I don't dispute your experience, but this certainly didn't happen in practice at my school.
Fortunately at my school, there was only one official uniform supplier you could use so everyone had to wear the same quality grade of uniform (the school also had a second-hand supply of uniforms at a discount that were either donated to the school by leaving students or sold back to the school by leaving students at a discount, but the rules about how badly worn or damaged the uniform was allowed to be were strict, so you couldn't get away with an old uniform for too long).  It's hard to form visually obvious cliques when you are all forced to dress alike in very strict limits of variability for accessorising or personalizing.

At most, we had the smart/geeky girls, the sporty girls and the religious girls, but we were defined by our interests and extramural activities, not our appearence. I really don't remember anything in the way of people being picked on for any aspects of their clothing. I'm sure bullying must have happened but to be honest, I can't remember any obvious instances of it (and I was a fat geeky girl who loved the library and chess club, so you think I'd have been a prime target for that sort of thing). Mind you, I suck at picking up social clues, so it's possible people were trying to pick on me, but I was too dumb to realise it.  ::)

I'm not so sure about that, or at least that wasn't the experience I had. Even with the uniform, there were still girls who were just... cooler than everyone else. Their hair was cooler or their 'look' was cooler or they figured out a way to wear their uniform so it looked better - trendier, sassier, whatever. At the other end of the spectrum, there were the girls who still managed to look 'square' (as the term was then, I'm sure it's different now - 'frumpy', is the descriptor I'm going for), no matter that we were all in uniform. And they all did tend to stick together, so we still had groups who gravitated towards each other based on appearance. I was somewhere in the middle: not frumpy, but very definitely not one of the cool kids, and hung out with other girls who looked/dressed/behaved the same.

That said, I'm very much in favour of the uniform.


WolfWay

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #112 on: April 09, 2014, 07:27:48 AM »
I like the idea of a school uniform, but in practice you still have the same types of "classism".  We have black, white, or school color polo style shirts, khaki, black, or navy trousers/shorts that reach the knee.  Some kids have the more expensive brands that you can tell are expensive even without logos (which are banned).  Other students do get uniforms at Goodwill or Wal-Mart and it shows just as much.  You still get just as much teasing and bullying about clothing as you did before uniforms.

I don't dispute your experience, but this certainly didn't happen in practice at my school.
Fortunately at my school, there was only one official uniform supplier you could use so everyone had to wear the same quality grade of uniform (the school also had a second-hand supply of uniforms at a discount that were either donated to the school by leaving students or sold back to the school by leaving students at a discount, but the rules about how badly worn or damaged the uniform was allowed to be were strict, so you couldn't get away with an old uniform for too long).  It's hard to form visually obvious cliques when you are all forced to dress alike in very strict limits of variability for accessorising or personalizing.

At most, we had the smart/geeky girls, the sporty girls and the religious girls, but we were defined by our interests and extramural activities, not our appearence. I really don't remember anything in the way of people being picked on for any aspects of their clothing. I'm sure bullying must have happened but to be honest, I can't remember any obvious instances of it (and I was a fat geeky girl who loved the library and chess club, so you think I'd have been a prime target for that sort of thing). Mind you, I suck at picking up social clues, so it's possible people were trying to pick on me, but I was too dumb to realise it.  ::)

I'm not so sure about that, or at least that wasn't the experience I had. Even with the uniform, there were still girls who were just... cooler than everyone else. Their hair was cooler or their 'look' was cooler or they figured out a way to wear their uniform so it looked better - trendier, sassier, whatever. At the other end of the spectrum, there were the girls who still managed to look 'square' (as the term was then, I'm sure it's different now - 'frumpy', is the descriptor I'm going for), no matter that we were all in uniform. And they all did tend to stick together, so we still had groups who gravitated towards each other based on appearance. I was somewhere in the middle: not frumpy, but very definitely not one of the cool kids, and hung out with other girls who looked/dressed/behaved the same.

That said, I'm very much in favour of the uniform.

We had a very strict set of rules for how uniforms could be worn or accesorized (also: no make up, no elaborate/fancy hair cuts, hair past your collar had to be tied up in a simple neat pony tail/plait, no fringe past your nose unless it was clipped back or held back with an alice band, no long nails, no nail polish, no dying your hair, no tinting your eye lashes or eyebrows, no fancy braiding for the non-white girls, no fancy earrings).

I do remember the most the "cool" girls could get away with with to wear their top shirt button undone, their ties askew and to roll their skirts up at the waist to get a mini-skirt look, but woe betide them if a teacher saw it because they'd end up in detention for having a skirt that was too short. I got detention once because a button fell of my blazer right before dress inspection.
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mechtilde

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #113 on: April 09, 2014, 07:57:39 AM »
Fortunately at my school, there was only one official uniform supplier you could use so everyone had to wear the same quality grade of uniform (the school also had a second-hand supply of uniforms at a discount that were either donated to the school by leaving students or sold back to the school by leaving students at a discount, but the rules about how badly worn or damaged the uniform was allowed to be were strict, so you couldn't get away with an old uniform for too long).  It's hard to form visually obvious cliques when you are all forced to dress alike in very strict limits of variability for accessorising or personalizing.

I concur. This is the situation with every school in my area and also the ones I attended.

All the secondary schools are like that round here. Whilst it has its advantages, it can lead to problems if the supplier is expensive or the quality is poor.
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oz diva

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #114 on: April 09, 2014, 08:41:23 AM »
I run the 2nd hand uniform shop at school. We chuck out the ratty stuff.  It's pretty popular. No one minds the kids wearing hand me downs. The kids don't notice or care.

Victoria

Harriet Jones

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #115 on: April 09, 2014, 09:44:44 AM »
We've never had to deal with school uniforms, but, in theory, I don't think I'd mind, assuming that the uniforms weren't overpriced and the dress code wasn't overly strict (e.g., kids getting in trouble if their belt was a millimeter too wide)

alkira6

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #116 on: April 09, 2014, 11:38:59 AM »
The thing is, our district is only strict on certain parts of the dress code and couldn't give a flying flip about the rest, even though they are the ones who say that we have to have it.

It has been put forth repeatedly that we should have a single supplier for uniforms to cut out the above mentioned problems but that goes nowhere.  We have also suggested a reformation of the guidelines to something more reasonable considering the economic disparities across our district, also a no go.

z_squared82

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #117 on: April 09, 2014, 12:03:29 PM »
I had a school uniform for 12 years. I didn't think about if I liked it or not until I got the college (it's not like I had a choice in the matter). Once college started, I realized how awesome uniforms were. I had to start getting up earlier in order to give myself time to figure out what to wear! Never had that problem why my option was either plaid skirt or khaki pants.

The school uniforms were girls had to buy were not cheap, but all moms bought them big so they could be worn for years. I think I had one jumper from 1-3 grade, a bigger one for 4-6 grade, then we switched to skirts for 7-8 grade. Then onto high school, where you bought one three sizes too big for freshman year (and moved the button over) and by senior year, you were keeping it together with safety pins. Also, the skirts in high school got washed maybe once a month. Seriously, we joked that in case of nuclear holocaust, the only things that would survive were cockroaches and our uniform skirts.

jedikaiti

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #118 on: April 09, 2014, 04:56:20 PM »
I had a school uniform for 12 years. I didn't think about if I liked it or not until I got the college (it's not like I had a choice in the matter). Once college started, I realized how awesome uniforms were. I had to start getting up earlier in order to give myself time to figure out what to wear! Never had that problem why my option was either plaid skirt or khaki pants.

The school uniforms were girls had to buy were not cheap, but all moms bought them big so they could be worn for years. I think I had one jumper from 1-3 grade, a bigger one for 4-6 grade, then we switched to skirts for 7-8 grade. Then onto high school, where you bought one three sizes too big for freshman year (and moved the button over) and by senior year, you were keeping it together with safety pins. Also, the skirts in high school got washed maybe once a month. Seriously, we joked that in case of nuclear holocaust, the only things that would survive were cockroaches and our uniform skirts.

That reminds me of a poll question from our yearbook one year. They asked several students how they make their uniform skirt stand out from the rest. My friend's response was "I wash it." Many girls kept a skirt or two in their locker to wear each day - put it on the morning, take it off in the afternoon - and they might only go home for washing on holidays.
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mime

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Re: Opinions on school uniforms
« Reply #119 on: April 10, 2014, 10:34:16 AM »
My son has uniforms with very little flexibility:
Boys: Navy pants, red polo shirt, navy cardigan. All of these are a particular style from one particular store. The choices are: long or short sleeves, and you don't have to wear the cardigan.
Girls: Navy pants like the boys or a specific skirt. White short-sleeved blouse, navy cardigan (optional).

I have been so glad to have the uniforms becuase getting my 9 year old to *not* dress like a slob is a challenge! The thing I don't like is the limitations on supplier. The pants are $30 each and there aren't sales.

I had no uniforms in my own school back in the 80's. We were at an inner-city school and nobody had much money so name brands were very rare, and almost never used to judge or "class" each other. Kids separated themselves based on activities, sports, academics, and cultural background (about 1/3 of our student body had only been in the US for around 5 years before high school). We were very diverse and while I do remember a few of the popular-snob type kids, there wasn't much in the way of cliques. Uniforms wouldn't have been solving any problems there.