General Etiquette > All In A Day's Work

Did I say too much?

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Lynn2000:
What's done is done. But, in the future, now that you know this kind of question might come up, you can work on a more positive answer. I tend to take things literally and might not have realized it was just a rephrasing of the "strengths and weaknesses" question as Skibunny suggests; but now, I know better.

I like SoCalVal's wording, "I would hope my boss would detail my stellar 13-year experience spent not only jumping through flaming hoops on one leg but also while balancing teacups on my nose."

My mom's company had a policy that they were not allowed to tell people anything other than that So-and-so did indeed work for them for X dates, and then refer them to HR. I have no idea what HR was allowed to tell them, but they would only be looking at a cold, hard service record, whereas my mom was the ex-employee's supervisor. (I think they had a few too many lawsuits over claims that supervisors were bad-mouthing ex-employees to potential employers.) One more reason to not take the question literally, I guess.

siamesecat2965:
Being that many companies will only verify dates, salary etc. I wonder if the interviewier, knowing this, asked you that question to see how you'd respond or to ferret any info out of you they wouldn't gert during a reference check.  Kind of sneaky, but still a legitimate question.

GSNW:
You can also come at it from... "Well, if she were truthful, she would say that I am willing to deal with a lot coming at me from all sides and maintain my  job performance."

She might not be truthful, but you can't control that.

TootsNYC:
Every question is one that you should use as an opportunity to highlight great things about you.

So it really doesn't matter so much what your boss would *really* say. You don't want to be wildly inaccurate.

But this is a chance for the applicant to indicate that they know what *A* boss would value, and to say whether they did things that *A* boss would value.

So, I like the phrase, "I hope that she would highlight..."

And things like,
"my reliability,"
"my willingness to stick with a project even when things get difficult,"
"my evenness of temperament,"
"my ability to keep the company's well-being uppermost in my mind,"
"my ability to work with all the different coworkers,"
and other sorts of stuff like that.

gramma dishes:

--- Quote from: RebeccainGA on May 03, 2013, 10:11:18 AM ---...    "My previous supervisor and I had a difference of opinion about work styles. However, every manager I've worked for before her would tell you that I'm hardworking, a self starter, frequently mentor others without losing focus on my own priorities, and never say no to learning a new skill." Seemed to work.

--- End quote ---

--- Quote from: TootsNYC on May 03, 2013, 06:59:05 PM ---Every question is one that you should use as an opportunity to highlight great things about you.

So it really doesn't matter so much what your boss would *really* say. You don't want to be wildly inaccurate.

But this is a chance for the applicant to indicate that they know what *A* boss would value, and to say whether they did things that *A* boss would value.

So, I like the phrase, "I hope that she would highlight..."

And things like,
"my reliability,"
"my willingness to stick with a project even when things get difficult,"
"my evenness of temperament,"
"my ability to keep the company's well-being uppermost in my mind,"
"my ability to work with all the different coworkers,"
and other sorts of stuff like that.

--- End quote ---

I like both these approaches.  You could use whichever one seemed to fit your particular interviewing situation best, or use both!

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