Author Topic: Age Limits and Managing Volunteers Small update #15  (Read 4648 times)

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MissBrit

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Re: Age Limits and Managing Volunteers
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2013, 07:13:33 PM »
Our bosses were the ones who came up with the age limit but didn't tell us. We just happened to notice it in the letter that was sent out to the volunteers. I would like to have a conversation with my bosses to find out why they chose age 9. I really like the idea of having to turn 9 during the calendar year. Tonight is the annual volunteer picnic so I am betting that this will come up. More updates soon!

gramma dishes

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Re: Age Limits and Managing Volunteers
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2013, 09:34:34 PM »
...   The rule can be amended slightly for the first year ONLY to say that any child with previous experience who is within one year of meeting the age requirement can be grandfathered in with permission from the theatre's managers who have final decision-making authority. (That leaves it in your hands.) And no, I wouldn't grandfather in Boy 2 primarily for his misbehavior but also because he is much too far away from reaching the new age requirement.


* You may want to have rules like misbehavior can only happen once before the child's right to usher is revoked for the season. In addition, a child of any parent found to have lied about the child's age will not be allowed to work as an usher for two seasons.)

I like this approach!

Virg

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Re: Age Limits and Managing Volunteers Small update #15
« Reply #17 on: May 07, 2013, 10:12:27 AM »
SingActDance wrote:

"I think you should be consistent. If the age limit is 9, then the age limit is 9. I understand feeling some affinity for the older child, but if you start giving wiggle room on this rule, it will do nothing but create a headache and bad feelings. The older child can volunteer again next summer."

Strict adherence to a rule that seems to have been arbitrarily declared will also create bad feelings.  How do you think the kid who's done the job well for years and will just miss the age limit by a little bit will feel about it?  Why are the feelings of a misbehaving child far too young for the job, or his mother who lied to get him in and won't supervise him, more important than the well behaved and proven child?  What makes you think he'll want to return next summer after being told, "you're great at it but because of the accident of your birth, you're not allowed to do the job"?

There's more than enough grounds to dismiss the younger child without any consideration of age at all, so drawing this particular line in the sand and then treating it like an edict from on high is counterproductive.  Letting this kid who likes doing a job that he's proven skilled at continue doing the job is far more important than any consistency derived from following the letter of this rule.

Virg

Margo

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Re: Age Limits and Managing Volunteers Small update #15
« Reply #18 on: May 07, 2013, 11:02:53 AM »
I really like GrammarNerd's approach, and Amara's suggestion about some wriggle room for the first year.

However, t sounds like you need to speak to management first just in case the rule change is down to something outside their/your control (I imagine situations where there might be rules around insurance, for example, or child protection, which could mean that the rule had to be strictly adheared to. If that is the case, then I think it would be sensible to explain this to parents so that they know it is not up to you.

I do not think it would be at all unfair or unreasonable to treat your two underage children differently, as their situations are totally different.

SingActDance

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Re: Age Limits and Managing Volunteers Small update #15
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2013, 12:04:51 PM »
SingActDance wrote:

"I think you should be consistent. If the age limit is 9, then the age limit is 9. I understand feeling some affinity for the older child, but if you start giving wiggle room on this rule, it will do nothing but create a headache and bad feelings. The older child can volunteer again next summer."

Strict adherence to a rule that seems to have been arbitrarily declared will also create bad feelings.  How do you think the kid who's done the job well for years and will just miss the age limit by a little bit will feel about it?  Why are the feelings of a misbehaving child far too young for the job, or his mother who lied to get him in and won't supervise him, more important than the well behaved and proven child?  What makes you think he'll want to return next summer after being told, "you're great at it but because of the accident of your birth, you're not allowed to do the job"?

There's more than enough grounds to dismiss the younger child without any consideration of age at all, so drawing this particular line in the sand and then treating it like an edict from on high is counterproductive.  Letting this kid who likes doing a job that he's proven skilled at continue doing the job is far more important than any consistency derived from following the letter of this rule.

Virg

I'm not denying the child might feel disappointed. If the OP feels the rule is arbitrary and unfair, she should take it up with her superiors. If they choose to adjust the rule to "turning 9 within the calendar year" or "children who have previously ushered and will meet the age requirement within the calendar year may continue to usher" then that will accommodate the child and still stay consistent with the rules. If they go with the former, be prepared to accept children who will turn 9 on December 31st of the year to want to usher as well.

I am saying that once you make an exception, it opens the door for more exceptions. And more and more. ("But my child will turn 9 just 5 weeks after that child, and you let them do it.")

Are there not other children (ages 6 or 7) who have previously ushered that are now being cut, or are these the only two affected by this rule change?
Most people look at musical theatre and think "Why are those people singing and dancing in the street?" I'm sort of the opposite. I see a street full of people and think, "Why aren't they?"

Eeep!

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Re: Age Limits and Managing Volunteers
« Reply #20 on: May 07, 2013, 12:27:44 PM »
...   The rule can be amended slightly for the first year ONLY to say that any child with previous experience who is within one year of meeting the age requirement can be grandfathered in with permission from the theatre's managers who have final decision-making authority. (That leaves it in your hands.) And no, I wouldn't grandfather in Boy 2 primarily for his misbehavior but also because he is much too far away from reaching the new age requirement.


* You may want to have rules like misbehavior can only happen once before the child's right to usher is revoked for the season. In addition, a child of any parent found to have lied about the child's age will not be allowed to work as an usher for two seasons.)

I like this approach!

I think this is a really good way of handling it.
I too am curious as to what is involved in "ushering". I would be quite suprised to arrive a theater and have a 5 year old take me to my seat. Unless it was a children's performance or something. 
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind." - Dr. Seuss

snowdragon

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Re: Age Limits and Managing Volunteers
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2013, 01:50:04 PM »
...   The rule can be amended slightly for the first year ONLY to say that any child with previous experience who is within one year of meeting the age requirement can be grandfathered in with permission from the theatre's managers who have final decision-making authority. (That leaves it in your hands.) And no, I wouldn't grandfather in Boy 2 primarily for his misbehavior but also because he is much too far away from reaching the new age requirement.


* You may want to have rules like misbehavior can only happen once before the child's right to usher is revoked for the season. In addition, a child of any parent found to have lied about the child's age will not be allowed to work as an usher for two seasons.)

I like this approach!

I think this is a really good way of handling it.
I too am curious as to what is involved in "ushering". I would be quite suprised to arrive a theater and have a 5 year old take me to my seat. Unless it was a children's performance or something.

I would too, and a child of any age is the last one that I would call in the event of an emergency or a problem with seats.   And those are the things I associate with ushers duties.