Author Topic: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate  (Read 8064 times)

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Thipu1

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #45 on: May 12, 2013, 09:54:33 AM »
That's true. 

Decades ago I was on a bus tour of Spain that spent a few days on the Costa del Sol.  On the tour were two ladies from Puerto Rico.  They took a look at the beach outside the hotel and turned to each other.  'Not much like home, is it?'

Well no, it isn't.  The sand on Mediterranean beaches tends to be much coarser than the fine sand you find in Puerto Rico.  It's still beautiful and the guy who grilled the flapping-fresh fish for lunch on the beach for next to nothing is someone I will always remember. 

Things may not be exactly like home but don't we travel for new experiences that widen our horizons? 

« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 09:59:01 AM by Thipu1 »

Venus193

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #46 on: May 12, 2013, 10:10:19 AM »
Indeed.

While Law & Order was still in production and being seen all over the planet many people were under the impression that every city block here was a crime scene.  The late Jerry Orbach reacted to that by saying "Maybe we should have an episode of everyone hanging out at the 27 eating donuts."

WillyNilly

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #47 on: May 12, 2013, 10:28:11 AM »
Indeed.

While Law & Order was still in production and being seen all over the planet many people were under the impression that every city block here was a crime scene.  The late Jerry Orbach reacted to that by saying "Maybe we should have an episode of everyone hanging out at the 27 eating donuts."

As a NYer this is one of those things I don't like about people from from other places. I mean a bit of mis-guidedness ok I get it, but honestly? NY has very low crime. We don't even make it onto the list of 100 most dangerous cities in the US and if you got to the list of 500 most dangerous cities we are in the 400's.
Of course number-wise we might have more crime then other places, but per capita not so much; you have to remember NYC is very geographically large and by far has the most people of any city in the country.
And even on Law & Order, much like anywhere else, most crimes are not committed by random strangers on strangers, the victims usually have a connection to their assailant.

Yet its not uncommon to have people move here and talk about the crime and say how certain neighborhoods are dangerous and how they wouldn't live/shop/go [insert random neighborhood] in a snotty tone as they wax poetic about their quaint little 'hood and as a life-long NYer that does make my blood boil. Yes you always need to be street smart in NYC, but no you won't get mugged for wearing a leather jacket on the subway or for walking through any particular neighborhood. Especially since in the last 20 years many former very bad neighborhoods have become ultra-posh. Its laughable for a long term NYer to hear a transplant who lives in Alphabet City or Bed-Stuy talk about how dangerous somewhere random like Harlem or Ridgewood is - many of us remember how folks wouldn't dare step foot in the first two neighborhoods not too long ago, and now no-where is dangerous. Its especially insulting when they are calling the neighborhood I live in, or frequent, dangerous. Its not, its a lovely family orientated community.

Venus193

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #48 on: May 12, 2013, 12:29:35 PM »
Absolutely!

One thing in NYC that does bother me is the borough snobbery I've been on the receiving end of a few times.  I have known a few Manhattanites slip and go on rants about how Brooklynites and Queens residents should "stay where they belong."

My neighborhood has become cool in recent years and I pay less for my apartment than they pay for something half the size.

Amanita

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #49 on: May 12, 2013, 01:28:21 PM »
Yeah, when my mom found out I'd be going to NYC, she was kinda worried. She said to my dad that she wished I was going back to San Francisco instead.
Well, I've been to NYC twice and my meat's still attached to my bones. As one wag on tripadvisor says, "Law and Order and CSI:NY are not documentaries!"

On my first visit, I was bored one evening, so decided that instead of sitting on my butt in my hotel room, I was going to walk the Brooklyn Bridge, in the wind and drizzle. It was awesome! Partway through the walk, I let the kimono I was wearing slip down off my shoulders (I had a tank top underneath) and let its tail blow in the breeze behind me. With my loose hair blowing in the wind and robes in disarray, I must have looked like a grinning wild woman. But it felt amazing! I even got a bit playful with the bridge itself, grasping its suspender ropes and gently pushing myself off, springing from one to another. Nothing crazy or flamboyant, just having some fun with that handsome old bridge.

When my mom found out I'd been on the Brooklyn Bridge at 11 pm, she was all like "Taking your life in your hands, aren't you?" As if I had done something horribly dangerous.

When I was growing up, my mom trash talked NYC so much, going on about how nasty it was, that I referred to her as a "NewYorkaphobe".
Oh well, I know where my loyalties lie- The city flag of NYC hangs proudly on my bedroom door!
And a nice little book I've got called "NYC: An Owner's Manual" talks about nice neighborhoods to live in, in all the boroughs, not just Manhattan:)

sparksals

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #50 on: May 12, 2013, 02:02:59 PM »
What is an everything with nothing?

Come to NYC and find out 

An everything bagel with nothing on it    ;D

And what is an everything bagel?

A bagel is a specific kind of bread, that is boiled before its baked. It has a distinct donut shape, a super smooth shiny crust and a chewy center. NYers are very picky and particular about bagels (if you have only ever had mass produced grocery store bagels, or from somewhere like Dunkin' Donuts, to most NYer's you have never had a bagel - bagels are only edible within hours of being baked. Many consider toasting a bagel blasphemy.) They are purchased at specific bagel stores, from delis, some groceries but not all, and from street carts throughout the city.

A plain is self explanatory. But then there are toppings baked on: poppy seeds, sesame seeds, big chunks of salt (like you might get on a large soft pretzel), onion flakes or garlic (brown and slightly soft and moist, not dry and hard and crunchy). There are also a few standard dough flavors - regular, pumpernickel and egg, and of late whole wheat. A few places do weird things like blueberry bagels, but those are mostly seen as novelties not standard bagels. An everything bagel is regular dough and has all five of the standard toppings baked on.

A very NY right-of-passage is being out at 4-5am (perhaps having stuck around till bars closed at 4) and going to one of the few major bagel bakeries like H&H, and getting an ultra fresh bagel. Sure you can get a fresh bagel occasionally in a shop mid-morning, but there is something magical about these bakeries that supply the city daily with our favorite bread, and getting a bagel from that stash destined to be carted off to the various delis or picked up by the street cart guys.


My SIL took me to a bagel shop on Columbia (I think) that had the BEST bagels.  It was next to a bra store owned by a Jewish Lady.  I know she is jewish b/c we went on a Jewish holiday and it was closed.  Apparently, she is well known for her bra fitting and taking control of the girls. 




Thipu1

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #51 on: May 12, 2013, 03:50:45 PM »
Indeed.

While Law & Order was still in production and being seen all over the planet many people were under the impression that every city block here was a crime scene.  The late Jerry Orbach reacted to that by saying "Maybe we should have an episode of everyone hanging out at the 27 eating donuts."

In the late 1990s, our neighborhood was chosen to be the background for a TV series.  Merchants were thrilled.  Their businesses would be seen weekly on national TV and the area would become a place tourists would want to visit.  The owner of a diner across the street from our building was very
proud that his place was chosen to be a backdrop for the opening credits of every episode. 

As soon as the first show aired, that opinion changed.

The series was 'Brooklyn South'. It was an extremely violent police show that had nothing at all in
common with the neighborhood. In the first show, one cop says to another, 'That's seven dead this
week'.  The other cop answers, 'So, what's new?

 Around  here it would be very new. For several decades before the show started filming, our neighborhood was considered one of the safest in a city that was becoming more and more safe. 

Everyone was up in arms about this.  The NYPD was not at all happy.  The Mayor made his displeasure loudly known. There were even neighborhood rumors that the owner of the diner was filing suit against the producers for defamation of character.

'Brooklyn South' lasted only one season and, I can almost guarantee that, after that eagerly awaited first episode, no one in the neighborhood watched the thing. It was up against tough competition and, all bias aside, it wasn't a good show and it presented a quiet, pleasant place to live and work
as a Hell-Hole.

           
« Last Edit: May 12, 2013, 03:54:45 PM by Thipu1 »

Mopsy428

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #52 on: May 12, 2013, 06:47:42 PM »
When I told my former boss that I lived in Queens, she said, "QUEENS?! I can't picture you in Queens!! That's a rough neighborhood!" OK. First, there are many neighborhoods in Queens. Second, I lived in Astoria. The biggest danger to me was bad baklava.  ::) I've never felt unsafe in Queens, as opposed to other places. I was viciously attacked in my hometown when I was 14. I lived next to Golden Gate Park, and I would NOT walk next to it after dark. I lived in a rough neighborhood in Philly where you just did not turn right after you left my apartment. So, someone telling me that Queens was rough, and no one could picture me in Queens was a bit odd.

Just Lori

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #53 on: May 12, 2013, 08:13:01 PM »
I lived in SW Florida for several years, where much of the population is from somewhere else.  Sometimes people make the mistake of thinking that they're doing the new location a favor simply by being there.  It's much better to take some time to get to know the locals and appreciate the local way of doing things, rather than showing up and saying, "This is how we did things up north."  Communication makes a huge difference.

Nobody wants to hear their beloved hometowns criticized.  My BIL and his family love living in the mountains.  I understand why they love it so.  But I don't know why they have to criticize our city when they visit.  It's home for us, and we're not impressed by their negative reviews.


Thipu1

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #54 on: May 12, 2013, 09:30:36 PM »
This sort of thing happens a lot in small towns all over the world.  It happened to our little town in the 1950s.

At that time, people wanted to move out of NYC. The opening of the New York Thruway and the Tappan Zee Bridge made our area very desirable.  They could live in the country but have an easy commute to NYC. 

Places that used to be open fields started to bristle with housing developments. More people meant more business for local merchants.  That was fine. They needed the trade. The county also liked new people coming in because that meant more money from property taxes.   

What wasn't fine was that the new people thought they could come in, run for public office and tell the rubes who had lived there for generations the way things should be done. 

Everyone who has been born and raised in a small town knows that natives will dig in their heels against the folks they call 'Carpet Baggers'.  That's what happened. 

The town could have been better than it was but the people, black, white, Jew, Protestant, or Catholic were not going to let the new arrivals dictate what the town was going to become.

Town meetings were not pleasant.  Eventually, a compromise was reached and the new people had a reasonable say in what the town did.  The newcomers just didn't get everything the way they wanted it.         

 

iridaceae

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #55 on: May 13, 2013, 03:15:55 AM »
Quote from: sparksal


My SIL took me to a bagel shop on Columbia (I think) that had the BEST bagels.  It was next to a bra store owned by a Jewish Lady.  I know she is jewish b/c we went on a Jewish holiday and it was closed.  Apparently, she is well known for her bra fitting and taking control of the girls.
To jump off of this I'm still uncertain as to why all bagels are supposed to be just like NYC bagels or they're unfit for human consumption; they didn't originate there,  after all.

Venus193

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #56 on: May 13, 2013, 06:06:47 AM »
I thought pizza did until I found out that there was a form of it in ancient Rome (probably more like foccaccia).

Someone from Spain told me that a friend of his who had spent a lot of time in NYC tried to open a pizzeria in Madrid but could never replicate the flavor of a NY pizza.  It could have been the water or the local tomatoes; he couldn't figure it out.

Thipu1

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #57 on: May 13, 2013, 08:49:56 AM »
I thought pizza did until I found out that there was a form of it in ancient Rome (probably more like foccaccia).

Someone from Spain told me that a friend of his who had spent a lot of time in NYC tried to open a pizzeria in Madrid but could never replicate the flavor of a NY pizza.  It could have been the water or the local tomatoes; he couldn't figure it out.

I think it's probably the water.  A few years back there was an article about a pizzeria in Los Angeles that couldn't duplicate a New York pizza without special water treatment.  I understand the the water in LA is not the best. 

Food is always a prime bone of contention between localities.  Just think of the regional barbecue battles and the undying devotion of Chicago and New York to their styles of pizza.  I've even meteople from Hawaii who claim that a pizza isn't a real pizza without spam and pineapple.  Of course, I just might have met Hawaiians with Naugahyde palates. 

A non-NYC bagel can be a perfectly nice thing to eat.  It just isn't a New York bagel. 

Sorry Lender's. 
« Last Edit: May 13, 2013, 10:29:28 AM by Thipu1 »

lowspark

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #58 on: May 13, 2013, 10:37:50 AM »
Yeah, I agree with PPs who say it's the same everywhere. I live in Houston and there are a lot of people who move down here for the jobs and then do nothing but complain about the weather, the traffic (so why did you move way out into the far suburbs?), etc.

If you live somewhere that you're not originally from, you can either adapt and make it your home or you can whine and moan about how it's not the same as where you were from originally. You can make your own misery but don't project it on to me!

As an aside, there's a bagel shop spittin' distance from my house which serves authentic New York Bagels. Back in the mid 70s, the owner of that shop went to live in New York and learned how to make real bagels. He then returned to Houston and opened this place. Yes, they boil then bake and yes they are the right texture and chewiness and yes, they turn into rocks if you don't eat them right away. And yes, people who live here who are from New York (and believe me, there are a lot of them!) swear by these bagels.

In NYC, I think you have to know where to go for good bagels because I've had some bagels there that can't hold a candle to the NY bagels at this shop. So not even all NY bagels are "real" bagels.

WillyNilly

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Re: Question for the New Yorkers- transplant hate
« Reply #59 on: May 13, 2013, 10:54:23 AM »
Quote from: sparksal


My SIL took me to a bagel shop on Columbia (I think) that had the BEST bagels.  It was next to a bra store owned by a Jewish Lady.  I know she is jewish b/c we went on a Jewish holiday and it was closed.  Apparently, she is well known for her bra fitting and taking control of the girls.
To jump off of this I'm still uncertain as to why all bagels are supposed to be just like NYC bagels or they're unfit for human consumption; they didn't originate there,  after all.

I'm not sure they do have to be like NYC bagels, but they do need to be actual bagels - boiled then baked - and not just rolls with a hole in the middle. NYC tends to make them correctly, and they are very popular in NYC, with is very populated, so they have become synonymous with NYC.

But another reason is because, and this is another I think reasonable "ugh transplants!" gripe NYers have - our city's name is co-oped by so many! A bagel, or pizza, or hot dog or anything else needn't be just like NYC does it else where... but if a store or company calls it a "NY bagel" or "NYC-style pizza", etc then yeah it better live up to that name. Otherwise just call it something else. And if you are from somewhere else and you are used to the pizza, or hot dogs or whatever from there, that were called "NYC style" don't come to NYC and say its wrong here in the city and this is not how a "NYC bagel" is supposed to taste!

I had a very frustrating conversation once. Apparently there is a chain of hotdog restaurants elsewhere in the country called Coney Island. So a person came to NYC and made a comment about wanting a Coney Island. Well to me, that sentence makes no sense whatsoever. Its like saying you want a Florida or you want a Wisconsin. Coney Island is a place, not a thing. Finally they explain - as if I'm the stupid one - they mean they want a hot dog. "Oh you want some Nathan's!" I replied finally understanding them. Oh my gosh they got so frustrated - again like I was stupid - that no they wanted an authentic NYC Coney Island hot dog. "Right, a Nathan's." We eventually had to just stop having the conversation.

I don't care what exists elsewhere in the country, but in NYC Coney Island is a neighborhood, and the famous hot dog place there is Nathan's. Don't come here and tell a NYer they are wrong about that as if we don't know our own city. Its fine, and even kind of cool that elsewhere "Coney Island" is a word like "McDonalds" but that definition does not work here.

People who come here ready to experience actual NYC are welcome and we don't have any hate towards them, tourist or transplant. But if you come here and try to tell NYC  that they are doing NYC wrong... no one's going to like you.

(Obviously all 'you" statements are general and not directed at anyone in particular.)