Author Topic: S/O Interview Attire: taking their suggestion vs. overdressing: Up. #19  (Read 3267 times)

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Deetee

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If it was me I would go with the slacks and blazer, but would get a new funky or trendy bright top. I would get someone to help me because I find clothes difficult. ( I enjoyed working when I always wrote a suit as that is easy)

Library Dragon

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I'd wear the grey slacks over the black - I think that is slightly less formal.  And instead of the jacket, wear a cute cardigan, again to dress it down a little.  You shouldn't have to go shopping for something to wear that you might not wear again.

I couldn't bring myself to wear jeans to an interview - my jeans generally fit much tighter than any dress pants I might have and I just wouldn't be comfortable mentally OR physically wearing jeans.

This was my thought as well.  If you wear the jacket you can skip chunky jewelry and go with a whimsical pin.  A trip to the local thrift store may provide just the item to express yourself.  For example if it was me it may be my Star Trek communicator pin, my pomegranite pin, or the pin of a cat watching a goldfish. Take a look at www.naturesjewelry.com to get an idea of what I mean

The dress code isn't just about culture, but can you follow directions and pay attention to the details of what they want.   :)

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blarg314

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I have a strong suspicion that the original ad was written by/for men - the "no ties" environment, feel free to wear jeans or khakis comment.

If I were a guy, I would know exactly what to wear - either nice jeans with a short sleeve button down shirt (no tie), or khakis and a good polo shirt. I wouldn't wear casual jeans and a t-shirt as too informal for an interview (although probably fine in the office).

As a woman, though, it's a lot harder to guess. I still wouldn't wear casual jeans and a t-shirt.  I might go for nice dark jeans with a good fit (or casual slacks), and a simple, slightly fitted, top. 

TootsNYC

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I say skip any sort of blazer or jacket and bring a cardigan.

I think if you've got black slacks, that's fine. And wear a not-too-dressy top.

stitchygreyanonymouse

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As much as my college-career-center-indoctrinated brain was screaming "no, no, jeans and khakis are NOT professional enough!", I took the advice of many posters and followed what they suggested in a guessing how that translates to womenís clothing way.

I ended up with dark jeans, leather heels, a slub knit shirt, and a linen jacket. I really would have been overdressed in what I originally planned to wear. I felt totally chic and confident. Also, I discovered Loft, and my checkbook and wardrobe will never be the same again.

Thanks to everyone for your advice.

(In case anyone is wondering, I owned the jeans and heels, but I went with:
This jacket, except in a blue and beige stripe that isnít on the website
And this shirt/sweater)

Ed. spelling
« Last Edit: May 14, 2013, 08:17:23 AM by stitchygreyanonymouse »

Minmom3

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I would go with the dressiest style their suggested range allows, even if it's not as dressy as you think you should be. (I'm not good with clothes, so sorry I can't be more specific.) Sometimes people say you can't "over dress" for an interview, but that's not really true; if you came in wearing a very formal suit, you would probably stand out in a bad way. I don't think it would be as bad as showing up in your pajamas (under dressed) and I don't think it would be a HUGE bad thing, but every little bit counts, you know?

Maybe a nice top and slacks, and bring a jacket that you COULD wear, but wait until you get there and look at how others are dressed--more flexibility.

I'm a Vet Tech, we deal with animals and bodily fluids all day every day.  We frequently wear them.  We expect people coming in for an interview to have on mid-range decent slacks (Dockers, chinos of some kind, NOT a fine wool gabardine!)  Nice shirt or blouse, but NOT fancy.   I've seen people come in for interviews dressed in skirts suits or pant suits suitable for greeting the public in a high end bank.  It's not well received, because it's not appropriate garb for that venue.   People who over dress in our world are thought to be too prissy and unwilling to 'get dirrrty', because our experience is that, even after they put on scrubs, they don't handle the body fluids well, and in our field, it's inevitable that we will be wearing them at some point.

IMO, if somebody with knowledge of a field and a specific company culture tells 'you' to wear X style clothing, you should do that.  You don't want to be a clone, but you do want to look like you belong and can blend in with the existing corporate/company culture.
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Lynn2000

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I would go with the dressiest style their suggested range allows, even if it's not as dressy as you think you should be. (I'm not good with clothes, so sorry I can't be more specific.) Sometimes people say you can't "over dress" for an interview, but that's not really true; if you came in wearing a very formal suit, you would probably stand out in a bad way. I don't think it would be as bad as showing up in your pajamas (under dressed) and I don't think it would be a HUGE bad thing, but every little bit counts, you know?

Maybe a nice top and slacks, and bring a jacket that you COULD wear, but wait until you get there and look at how others are dressed--more flexibility.

I'm a Vet Tech, we deal with animals and bodily fluids all day every day.  We frequently wear them.  We expect people coming in for an interview to have on mid-range decent slacks (Dockers, chinos of some kind, NOT a fine wool gabardine!)  Nice shirt or blouse, but NOT fancy.   I've seen people come in for interviews dressed in skirts suits or pant suits suitable for greeting the public in a high end bank.  It's not well received, because it's not appropriate garb for that venue.   People who over dress in our world are thought to be too prissy and unwilling to 'get dirrrty', because our experience is that, even after they put on scrubs, they don't handle the body fluids well, and in our field, it's inevitable that we will be wearing them at some point.

IMO, if somebody with knowledge of a field and a specific company culture tells 'you' to wear X style clothing, you should do that.  You don't want to be a clone, but you do want to look like you belong and can blend in with the existing corporate/company culture.

Yes, I was just thinking about this, because I work in a place where our part-time college-student interns could get dirty doing normal chores--soil, dust, plant material, etc.. For the actual employees I always tell them it's a jeans-and-t-shirt place, and I don't want to hear them say, "I don't want to do that chore today, because I don't want to get my clothes dirty."

We don't put anything about dress code in the job advertisements, and most people wear jeans and a t-shirt to the interview or maybe a bit nicer, like a button-down and khakis. Every once in a while we have someone show up in a suit and it's kind of like...  ??? In the first place they're dressed about three levels higher than the rest of us, which is kind of weird. Second, you start to get the feeling that they're a bit desperate for this job, that they're pulling out all the stops, which isn't attractive (also depends on body language etc. too, of course). Third, you suspect they don't have a good sense of the kind of duties the job entails and you wonder if they'll have a problem with doing some of the dirty parts.

If someone walked in the door for an interview wearing a suit, I wouldn't tell them to turn back around, you're an automatic NO. There's a lot of other things that go into the decision, and I'd rather they wear a suit than their pajamas or a t-shirt with an obscene saying on it or something like that. But it's noticeable, and not in a good way. I would think it would be even more noticeable, and in an even less-good way, if the company actually told you what to wear, and you ignored it. So, good job, OP! :)
~Lynn2000