Author Topic: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.  (Read 17773 times)

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Lorelei_Evil

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #150 on: May 19, 2013, 04:06:50 PM »
There's an interesting take on 50's food here: http://www.collectorsweekly.com/articles/the-1950s-most-nauseating-jell-o-soaked-recipes/

I'm fascinated by the amount of Jello used in US cooking back then- although it does appear in UK recipes of the time, they are usually sweet- although we did still eat a lot of preserved foods back then, including the new frozen foods. Fishfingers* anyone?


*Made in Grimsby by Youngs from the fifties onwards

I collect cookbooks.  I have some of those that she talked about.  The Black Magic chocolate cake that she talked about is really delicious, but oh the batter looks disgusting! 

m2kbug

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #151 on: May 19, 2013, 04:15:24 PM »
Slightly OT, but this thread reminds me of the first time I made my (now legendary) chocolate cake from scratch.  My husband (fiance at the time) took a couple of bites and decided it was the best chocolate cake he'd ever had.  He asked me, "What brand mix is this again?"

Yeah, he lived to tell the tale, if only barely.   >:D  I (sort of) forgave him because I think, to him, at the time, it was unheard of to make a cake without using a boxed mix.

I don't understand why he would have been in danger of not living to tell anyone about it.  He thought it was great.

Because she cooked it from scratch and he asked if it was a mix.   :D 


camlan

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #153 on: May 19, 2013, 08:26:33 PM »
I grew up in the 60s and we had plenty of Jello at my house. But always for dessert, not as a salad. Sometimes Mom would put a can or two of fruit cocktail in the Jello, but that was about as fancy as things got.

One of my aunts though--she put shredded cabbage and carrots in the Jello. Which just seemed weird--the sweet fruit taste of the Jello with the vegetables didn't make sense to my taste buds.

The 50s and 60s were full of inventions that made preparing and cooking food easier and faster. I'm sure my mom saw frozen vegetables as labor-saving, what with having to prepare dinner for nine people every night. I'm sure a lot of family cooks felt that way. And some of the prepared foods were cheaper. I know we didn't use the Hamburger Helper type things because Mom figured out it was cheaper to make casseroles from scratch, but we did eat Campbell's soups because they were cheaper than following Mom's recipes.
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Katana_Geldar

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #154 on: May 19, 2013, 08:44:21 PM »
DH refuses to eat canned soup and certain kinds of canned veggies. I did manage to get him to eat it once as part of a caserole though.

mechtilde

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #155 on: May 20, 2013, 03:34:14 AM »
Slightly OT, but this thread reminds me of the first time I made my (now legendary) chocolate cake from scratch.  My husband (fiance at the time) took a couple of bites and decided it was the best chocolate cake he'd ever had.  He asked me, "What brand mix is this again?"

Yeah, he lived to tell the tale, if only barely.   >:D  I (sort of) forgave him because I think, to him, at the time, it was unheard of to make a cake without using a boxed mix.

I don't understand why he would have been in danger of not living to tell anyone about it.  He thought it was great.

Because she cooked it from scratch and he asked if it was a mix.   :D

My father did the same thing when he asked my mother if the particularly delicious curry she had made him was from a Vesta packet (they made dehydrated curries)

Now to be fair the steak she'd cooked for him on their previous date, and the first thing she ever cooked for him was like shoe leather, so he thought she couldn't cook. He was very very wrong about that.

The good news for me was that Mum took it in good humour, and still married him.
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Hazmat

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #156 on: May 20, 2013, 04:02:51 AM »
I grew up in the 60s and we had plenty of Jello at my house. But always for dessert, not as a salad. Sometimes Mom would put a can or two of fruit cocktail in the Jello, but that was about as fancy as things got.

One of my aunts though--she put shredded cabbage and carrots in the Jello. Which just seemed weird--the sweet fruit taste of the Jello with the vegetables didn't make sense to my taste buds.

The 50s and 60s were full of inventions that made preparing and cooking food easier and faster. I'm sure my mom saw frozen vegetables as labor-saving, what with having to prepare dinner for nine people every night. I'm sure a lot of family cooks felt that way. And some of the prepared foods were cheaper. I know we didn't use the Hamburger Helper type things because Mom figured out it was cheaper to make casseroles from scratch, but we did eat Campbell's soups because they were cheaper than following Mom's recipes.
When I was in grade school in the 60s, about 3 times a week there would what looked like shredded cabbage & carrots in a block of green Jello on our lunch trays.  I say "looked like", because I never knew anyone to actually eat the stuff, I assumed it was a garnish (although I didn't know that word at the time, I understood the concept).
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Thipu1

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #157 on: May 20, 2013, 10:11:31 AM »
Sadly, I'm afraid that was meant to be a salad.  It was probably thought that children would eat it because of the Jello and get a little vegetable in the process.

IME, a garnish has never been known to grace a school meal. 


ladyknight1

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #158 on: May 20, 2013, 10:14:26 AM »
I don't know if mine really falls in line with the topic, but we have a lot of a particular group in my area.  I was asked to bring a salad to the pot luck, which I did.  Turns out when they say salad, they mean Jello+stuff in it.  Who knew?  :D

What I grew up with as "salad" in Texas. Not just with church, but all family events featured at least 3 "salads".

nutraxfornerves

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #159 on: May 20, 2013, 10:30:36 AM »
That vegetables-in-gelatin thing is Perfection Salad. It was actually a third-prize winner in a 1905 recipe contest sponsored by the Knox Gelatin company. Fannie Farmer was one of the judges and it was published in the 1906 edition of her cookbook as "Jellied Vegetables."


The link above is a 1915 cookbook published by Knox. in case you can't read the recipe:

PERFECTION SALAD
1 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine,
1 cup cold water.
1 cup mild vinegar.
2 tablespoonfuls lemon juice,
2 cups boiling water.
2 cup sugar.
1 teaspoonful salt.
1 cup cabbage, finely shredded.
2 cups celery, cut in small pieces.
2 pimentoes, cut in small pieces.


Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes. Add vinegar, lemon juice, boiling water, sugar, and salt. Strain, and when mixture begins to stiffen, add remaining ingredients. Turn into mold, first dipped in cold water, and chill. Remove to bed of lettuce or endive. Garnish with mayonnaise dressing, or cut in cubes, and serve in cases made of red or green peppers, or turn into molds lined with canned pimentoes. A delicious accompaniment to cold sliced chicken or veal.




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magicdomino

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #160 on: May 20, 2013, 10:59:42 AM »


The most dramatic was the Halloween cake.  This was a chocolate cake poked with red Jello. To do it right, you didn't leave the cake in the fridge quite as long as the recipe said. As a result, red would ooze out of the innocent-looking chocolate cake when it was sliced. 

What could be better to serve at a Halloween party for 10 year-olds?   

*makes notes for the next Hallween cake*

ladyknight1

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #161 on: May 20, 2013, 11:10:04 AM »
I started real goulash in the crock pot this morning. I can't wait for dinner!  ;D

Ms_Cellany

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #162 on: May 20, 2013, 11:21:23 AM »
Chicken fried steak is not chicken.  The name always confused me growing up.  Even now I had to look it up.  My dad made a version of it growing up, but called it fried steak.  He coated it with a flour mixture and fried it in a frying pan.  I don't like fried anything with exception to french fries, but I thought it was very good when he made it. 


It's called "chicken fried steak" because it's fried in the same manner you fry chicken: battered/floured.  Many Texas places now list "chicken fried chicken."

I had a visiting German journalist staying with me once, and insisted he try chicken fried steak as the quintessential Texas dish. He tasted it, and said, unimpressed, "Zis iss Schnitzel."

I had a flash of "D'oh, of course!  German settlers!"
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DottyG

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #163 on: May 20, 2013, 02:02:18 PM »
Quote
The most dramatic was the Halloween cake.  This was a chocolate cake poked with red Jello. To do it right, you didn't leave the cake in the fridge quite as long as the recipe said. As a result, red would ooze out of the innocent-looking chocolate cake when it was sliced.

COOL!  I want to try that now!


camlan

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Re: Food That Isn't What People Think it Is.
« Reply #164 on: May 20, 2013, 02:41:01 PM »
That vegetables-in-gelatin thing is Perfection Salad. It was actually a third-prize winner in a 1905 recipe contest sponsored by the Knox Gelatin company. Fannie Farmer was one of the judges and it was published in the 1906 edition of her cookbook as "Jellied Vegetables."


The link above is a 1915 cookbook published by Knox. in case you can't read the recipe:

PERFECTION SALAD
1 envelope Knox Sparkling Gelatine,
1 cup cold water.
1 cup mild vinegar.
2 tablespoonfuls lemon juice,
2 cups boiling water.
2 cup sugar.
1 teaspoonful salt.
1 cup cabbage, finely shredded.
2 cups celery, cut in small pieces.
2 pimentoes, cut in small pieces.


Soak gelatine in cold water five minutes. Add vinegar, lemon juice, boiling water, sugar, and salt. Strain, and when mixture begins to stiffen, add remaining ingredients. Turn into mold, first dipped in cold water, and chill. Remove to bed of lettuce or endive. Garnish with mayonnaise dressing, or cut in cubes, and serve in cases made of red or green peppers, or turn into molds lined with canned pimentoes. A delicious accompaniment to cold sliced chicken or veal.




There is an interesting book that takes its name from this salad: Perfection Salad: Women and Cooking at the Turn of the Century. It goes into detail on the types of food that were eaten at the beginning of last century, and how and why "scientific" methods were applied to cooking. And things like green and white luncheons. And I seem to remember an odd salad that, in part, consisted of a ring of pineapple and half a banana arranged in a peculiar fashion.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn