Author Topic: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket  (Read 4851 times)

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Luci45

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #30 on: May 21, 2013, 10:21:14 AM »
To me the most unnecessary packaging are the ginormous plastic things on electronics that are harder to break into than Fort Knox.  I don't know if that stuff can be recycled, but if it can't there needs to be a better solution.

I agree, there has to be a better solution, but I can't come up with it except put the security alert on the box itself. Here, at least, most of the CD and movie packaging are for instore, so it is taken off with a special machine and reused.

I looked this up a long time ago because of toy packaging when the grandchildren were little. I guess the toy packaging makes more sense for the retailer to keep his stock from unsupervised kids, and the electronics is of course for retail theft. I do recycle most of it. Here, anything with a number on it can be recycled.

At my house, the wrapping is more likely to be recycled because I take the time to do it, whereas if I left it in the store, I'm sure it just goes into the landfill. No one looks through the small trash at the store - just the big things like shipping cartons.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wrap_rage

http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-9912173-54.html#!

Hmmmmm

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #31 on: May 21, 2013, 10:42:04 AM »
I had seen something on 60 minutes or another news show about his documentary and had planned to see it. But this publicity stunt seems so idiotic that it has turned me off him and his documentary.

Redneck Gravy

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #32 on: May 21, 2013, 11:35:44 AM »
I had seen something on 60 minutes or another news show about his documentary and had planned to see it. But this publicity stunt seems so idiotic that it has turned me off him and his documentary.

POD


lowspark

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #33 on: May 21, 2013, 02:48:23 PM »
I just found the perfect place for Mr. Irons to get his groceries. In another thread we were discusing the (imo) inconvenience of grocery stores who make you bring your own bags and it was pointed out that Austin has legislated that people must do so. I was just googling that when I came across this article: http://www.rodale.com/plastic-bag-ban-0.

And from that, I quote:
Quote
Austin does seem to be a pioneer in reforming wasteful packaging. Last June, the city served as home to the country's first "no-packaging" grocery store, called in.gredients. You have to bring your own boxes, bags, jars, bottles, and other containers to fill up on the store's selection of only organic or local products, from beer to baby shampoo.

hmmmm... not someplace I'd shop, but what the heck do I know? I'm guessing that in addition to not providing packaging, this place probably charges way more than conventional stores. Cute gimmick though!

Venus193

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #34 on: May 21, 2013, 03:07:23 PM »
Oy, vey.

I just wish they would recycle glass like they did in my extreme youth, when soda bottles were sterilzed and reused.

DottyG

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #35 on: May 21, 2013, 06:13:11 PM »
lowspark, take that article with a grain of salt.  Paper isn't illegal in Austin.  Nor is plastic "illegal" (that's ludicrious).  You just won't get a plastic bag anymore when you shop.  You can still get paper bags in just about any store.

And some stores actually sell some plastic bags.  Randalls, for instance, sells plastic bags for 20 cents that are very sturdy and very much reusable.  You can't destroy the things.

The fear of doing away with plastic bags is actually unfounded.  It's not anywhere as horrible as it sounds at first.


SamiHami

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #36 on: May 21, 2013, 08:05:33 PM »
I agree with his cause -- excess packaging really bothers me.  But this isn't the way to handle it, and I agree with previous posters that it just puts the problem on the store workers, who have nothing to do with packaging decisions.

What I do is I refuse to buy products that have excess packaging, and I write a letter telling the company why.  For example, I bought store brand peppermint tea from my local grocery store, and when I got home I discovered that each individual tea bag was wrapped in plastic inside the box.  Yuck!  So I emailed them explaining why I wasn't going to buy the tea again, and suggesting that they reduce the packaging, because it was delicious tea and if it weren't for the packaging, I'd be a repeat customer.

No idea if my one letter made a difference, but surely if everyone who was annoyed by packaging contacted the supplying company, they'd take it into consideration?

See, now that is a reasonable way to make your point. If you and enough other customers make the same complaint/point to the company, it might actually effect a change. Making a mess at the checkout line just screams "look at meeeee! I'm special! Aren't I great?" without actually accomplishing anything more than annoying the store employees.

What have you got? Is it food? Is it for me? I want it whatever it is!

Yarnspinner

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #37 on: May 22, 2013, 05:35:45 PM »
Perhaps Mr. Irons could unwrap his items at home, then put each in a package or envelope and mail it to the offending company to let them dispose of it?  Because doing this to innocent store clerks is not, as someone else noted, going to end with Lipton Tea saying "Oi, I will now stop selling my tea in a cardboard box because Mr. Irons keeps leaving it all at the store....."

Not that I believe mailing lots of discarded packaging to the offending companies will make a difference either.  It just makes a wee bit more sense than dumping on store employees who have no influence over Heinz Ketchup or Monsanto Green Peas.

And yeah, I was wondering...does he open up the canned goods, too, and dump them into plastic bags or does he carry them home in his hands?

LEMon

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #38 on: May 25, 2013, 08:39:38 PM »
Main reasons I can figure for packaging:

advertisement of the product (larger box = more visible plus more room for information)
need for information on the packaging (if medical product, or ingredients and calorie info)
protection from damage during transportation and while on the shelf
safety sealing ability to prove no tampering
preservation of freshness or wholeness
loss prevention (bigger box less likely to be stolen easily)
making things able to be easily placed on the shelves (an odd shaped item inside a box, or placed in plastic so it can be hung on a hook)

Businesses have lots of reasons for what they do.  And they probably paid someone a pretty penny to create that packaging.
I still believe there are ways to cut down on packaging, but you still have to be reasonable about why they do it.  And leaving it at the store does nothing to solve the problem.

photochick

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #39 on: June 11, 2013, 12:58:20 AM »
Honestly, I think that's a horrible way to do it (and agree that it's likely a stunt).

If anyone wants to know good ways to do it read http://myplasticfreelife.com/
She's blogged about not having plastic/excessive packaging for ages and has a book.

Basically she buys items for the bulk food and brings her own containers. Also she writes companies that use plastic/excessive plastic. That's the way to do it.

Honestly when I was still in retail the story of a customer leaving all their packaging probably won't have made it past my supervisor, let alone corporate or the companies that made the product.

Isometric

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #40 on: June 11, 2013, 01:19:47 AM »

If anyone wants to know good ways to do it read http://myplasticfreelife.com/
She's blogged about not having plastic/excessive packaging for ages and has a book.


I'm having a bit of trouble getting the site to load, but I saw her (or someone doing a similar thing!) on TV and she was extremely inspiring.

I agree with the general consensus - but he has got us all talking about it, so perhaps it's actually a good thing? There's nothing like opening packaging to find... more packaging!

Where I live we also have no plastic bags in supermarkets, bring your own or you pay 20c or $1 each depending on the type of bag. It's generally not an issue once you're used to it, everyone occasionally forgets their bags and has to buy enough for their weekly shop, but IME people recycle them for other uses. I'm really proud of my state for doing it actually!

Winterlight

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #41 on: June 11, 2013, 10:13:37 AM »
Lately I've been bringing my own containers to the farmer's market. It means that they save on bags and my strawberries make it home unpulped. He could advocate for something like this, which is practical and other people can actually do, instead of making a mess and annoying people who have nothing to do with the packaging of food items.
If wisdom’s ways you wisely seek,
Five things observe with care,
To whom you speak,
Of whom you speak,
And how, and when, and where.
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Scottie

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Re: Jeremy Irons and littering packaging in a supermarket
« Reply #42 on: June 24, 2013, 03:37:44 AM »
Most supermarkets here in Germany have an area after the checkout with recycling containers for paper and plastic. The idea is that you can get rid of any excess packing straight away. I think it's a pretty good solution and I'm surprised it isn't more common.