Author Topic: Appropriating a picture on FB  (Read 9269 times)

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BigBadBetty

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #75 on: June 09, 2013, 10:27:50 PM »
Instead, by saying nothing, she implied that she took the picture herself and therefore credit for the picture (and the compliment) belonged to HER.   It was one of those 'lies by omission' that are not looked upon kindly by serious  photographers whether they're amateur or professional.  It's dishonest.

I completely disagree with this. When I post pictures that I took, I don't imply that I did. When others post pictures that I took, they don't imply that they did. Unless you're using Facebook differently than everybody I know, nobody implies anything.

I'm glad I am not the only one who feels this way. In my group of friends, posting a photo has no implication that the poster is the photographer. My friend Kate just posted 5 photos. I know for a fact that she did not take them since she is in them. She didn't credit the photographer. That is how most of the people in my group do it. My three friends who are professional photographers watermark their photos. I would never try to remove their watermarks. It never occurred to me that I would credit the person who took it. I usually hit the share button so the name of the original poster shows, but the original poster may or may not be the photographer.

TootsNYC

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #76 on: June 09, 2013, 10:38:41 PM »
I feel like I live in a different world than a lot of you.  Everyone I know shares other people's photos all the time on Facebook, and none of us care. 

In fact, I almost expect people to take my photos sometimes.   Multiple relatives get photos of my children that way, they save and print them from my facebook page, and I see them later framed in their homes.  I shared them for the actual purpose of sharing them, so why would that bother me?  And if they want to re-post them on their wall saying "look at my cute nephew" or whatever, I expect that to happen on Facebook.  It's a medium I use for that purpose, to share photos of my kids for other family to enjoy.  It has never occurred to me to need credit for taking the photo in question.  I just don't relate to this.

That's what the "share" button is for.  It allows FB users to share other people's photos while still showing who the original photographer was/is.  I like using the share button.  It's a lot easier than downloading and then uploading the same picture again.

And in fact, if I read the OP right, she'd have had no problem with the woman's using the "share" button. But she downloaded the pic and then uploaded it again so that it looks as if SHE took the photo.


And that might have been a bit forgivable, except for the bolded below:

Instead, by saying nothing, she implied that she took the picture herself and therefore credit for the picture (and the compliment) belonged to HER.   It was one of those 'lies by omission' that are not looked upon kindly by serious  photographers whether they're amateur or professional.  It's dishonest.

I completely disagree with this. When I post pictures that I took, I don't imply that I did. When others post pictures that I took, they don't imply that they did. Unless you're using Facebook differently than everybody I know, nobody implies anything.

THAT is where the woman was wrong. However, I think the OP should have immediately commented and said, "Thanks! That's one of mine. WomanWhosePageItIs got it from my Facebook album."

It's not the *posting* of the photo; that's minorly bad, especially since she DID have the option to SHARE it. What makes it really bad is that she didn't come back and acknowledge that the compliment wasn't hers to receive.

Roe

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #77 on: June 09, 2013, 10:47:52 PM »
Instead, by saying nothing, she implied that she took the picture herself and therefore credit for the picture (and the compliment) belonged to HER.   It was one of those 'lies by omission' that are not looked upon kindly by serious  photographers whether they're amateur or professional.  It's dishonest.

I completely disagree with this. When I post pictures that I took, I don't imply that I did. When others post pictures that I took, they don't imply that they did. Unless you're using Facebook differently than everybody I know, nobody implies anything.


My DH took a great picture of me and my children which I now use as my profile pic.  I didn't "credit" my DH with taking the picture.  Was I rude? He doesn't think so.  Also, it's obvious in the pic that I didn't take the picture as I have my arms around my children. 

With the amount of pictures being shared on FB, I think it's pretty silly to assume that every picture you post or share is taken by "you" unless otherwise credited.  At least, that's not the way I use FB and neither do my friends.

Mrs. Tilney

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #78 on: June 10, 2013, 09:55:47 PM »
I am wondering if the photographers in the his thread would be upset if someone took a picture that they had posted on Facebook, printed it out and displayed it in their home, or mailed it to relatives or used it as a Christmas card. Credit is stripped in that case as well. Would that be considered the same thing?

When I got my parents' Christmas letter last year, I discovered they included a picture of me that they had taken from my Facebook page. (Taken by a friend, with my camera.) Totally fine with me--it was a cute picture.

miranova

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #79 on: June 11, 2013, 12:20:07 PM »
Instead, by saying nothing, she implied that she took the picture herself and therefore credit for the picture (and the compliment) belonged to HER.   It was one of those 'lies by omission' that are not looked upon kindly by serious  photographers whether they're amateur or professional.  It's dishonest.

I completely disagree with this. When I post pictures that I took, I don't imply that I did. When others post pictures that I took, they don't imply that they did. Unless you're using Facebook differently than everybody I know, nobody implies anything.

I'm glad I am not the only one who feels this way. In my group of friends, posting a photo has no implication that the poster is the photographer.

Exactly. 

Why the assumption that the poster of the photo is "implying" anything?  Simply posting a photo is NOT an implication about who took the photo.  People are making a lot of uncharitable assumptions here.

GrammarNerd

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #80 on: June 11, 2013, 07:57:15 PM »
I don't understand what kind of 'credit' you wanted?  Glowing compliments?  Did you even have permission to post pictures of her daughters on FB? 

I covered this in post #12 when I clarified:

Quote
"It's a fine line, I think.  I don't necessarily want all of this praise or credit or glowing theatrical comments about my awesome photography skills.  But it annoyed me that it was reposted RIGHT AWAY and there was NO mention at all that even someone else took the picture.  Not even a 'thanks to the mom who took the picture...you know who you are!' or something like that.  (And that would have been fine.)"

I think it's obvious that people are in one of two camps on this.  I guess it's an 'agree to disagree' type of situation, somewhat affected by the level of friendship (or the relationship) or the dynamic of the friendship or family group.  Frankly, I'm surprised this thread is still getting responses!  I'll say it again, perhaps paraphrased in a different way: What irked me about the original situation wasn't that she used the picture.  It was the manner in which she used it, with the copying it and posting it to her own wall, and never saying that someone else (she wouldn't have even had to name me by name) took the picture, even after two separate people commented things like 'great shot!'.

And one other "interesting" thing: someone had a video of her same daughter doing another sport.  It was posted to youtube.  She put a link to the video on her wall, and said that 'one of the dads on the team made this video'.  So she didn't have a problem saying that someone else made the video even though she couldn't reference that the photo was taken by someone else.  I just rolled my eyes when I saw that.   ::)

Lynn2000

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #81 on: June 12, 2013, 10:49:39 AM »
I feel like there are definitely people coming from two different perspectives here, but I've not noticed anyone saying they don't think the original photographer deserves credit, or that they wouldn't credit someone who asked them to. It's just that Camp A seems to think about credit right away, and Camp B doesn't.

As a member of Camp B, I might not automatically remember/think to credit the original photographer, but I would happily do so if they made a polite comment about it. A member of Camp A can certainly say they refuse to remind Camp B people about credit and simply let it negatively affect their relationship with them, if they so choose, but that doesn't seem to be a very productive choice, IMO.
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PastryGoddess

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #82 on: June 12, 2013, 12:50:51 PM »
I feel like there are definitely people coming from two different perspectives here, but I've not noticed anyone saying they don't think the original photographer deserves credit, or that they wouldn't credit someone who asked them to. It's just that Camp A seems to think about credit right away, and Camp B doesn't.

As a member of Camp B, I might not automatically remember/think to credit the original photographer, but I would happily do so if they made a polite comment about it. A member of Camp A can certainly say they refuse to remind Camp B people about credit and simply let it negatively affect their relationship with them, if they so choose, but that doesn't seem to be a very productive choice, IMO.

As a firm member of Camp A I agree with you.  I believe that if credit is important, then it's on me to let people know that info upfront or with a gentle reminder.  I don't think you can have it both ways

Camarynne

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #83 on: June 14, 2013, 02:14:09 AM »
For many months I lived in a place where my only internet access was a phone with limited web access. Not a smartphone. I could see FB, and I could save pictures and upload them to my account but I could Not "share" them. That option simply didn't exist.  Could be something like that perhaps.
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BigBadBetty

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Re: Appropriating a picture on FB
« Reply #84 on: June 14, 2013, 11:31:21 AM »
For many months I lived in a place where my only internet access was a phone with limited web access. Not a smartphone. I could see FB, and I could save pictures and upload them to my account but I could Not "share" them. That option simply didn't exist.  Could be something like that perhaps.

My friend had a smartphone, but she had the same issue. Everything came from mobile uploads. About a year ago, there was some update to her phone that allowed her to share. I also notice that sometimes when I share, Facebook doesn't list the source. Of course, there is the whole other issue that some people don't want to be listed as the source. They would rather have their privacy. I don't think you can ever please everyone.