Author Topic: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts  (Read 8561 times)

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Browyn

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #45 on: July 06, 2013, 02:21:50 PM »
I have also seen the two menus issue in my family.  Some elaborate fancy dessert - maybe with alcohol as an ingredient - for the adults; and something more kid friendly for the little ones, like ice cream.

Miss Understood

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #46 on: July 07, 2013, 12:50:48 AM »
I'm just perplexed by the idea that dessert is considered a standard course for an everyday family meal.  In my family, and all my friends' families, dessert was reserved for special occasions (whether at home or at a restaurant) - not a daily thing.  Do/did most families serve dessert on a daily basis?  I can see how that could interfere with not only children's digestion, but adults' as well.

Unless there is an alcohol component to the dessert in question, I don't see a reason to restrict it to adults, but just the idea of making dessert plus the meal every day would have put my mother in fits.

mechtilde

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #47 on: July 07, 2013, 07:57:32 AM »
My Granny always cooked something for desert- it was often something very filling: a steamed sponge, a crumble, a pie and always served with custard. I suspect that during the twenties and thirties pudding was a good cheap way to fill up and have a lot of calories through flour, sugar, suet and margarine. This would have altered during WW2 as sugar and fat were strictly rationed.

She always made one for after lunch, and then had cake at teatime.
NE England

Sharnita

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #48 on: July 07, 2013, 08:43:19 AM »
I'm just perplexed by the idea that dessert is considered a standard course for an everyday family meal.  In my family, and all my friends' families, dessert was reserved for special occasions (whether at home or at a restaurant) - not a daily thing.  Do/did most families serve dessert on a daily basis?  I can see how that could interfere with not only children's digestion, but adults' as well.

Unless there is an alcohol component to the dessert in question, I don't see a reason to restrict it to adults, but just the idea of making dessert plus the meal every day would have put my mother in fits.

Definitely not a regular thing in my family.

Thipu1

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #49 on: July 07, 2013, 08:45:26 AM »
I'm just perplexed by the idea that dessert is considered a standard course for an everyday family meal.  In my family, and all my friends' families, dessert was reserved for special occasions (whether at home or at a restaurant) - not a daily thing.  Do/did most families serve dessert on a daily basis?  I can see how that could interfere with not only children's digestion, but adults' as well.

Unless there is an alcohol component to the dessert in question, I don't see a reason to restrict it to adults, but just the idea of making dessert plus the meal every day would have put my mother in fits.

In our family, there was always something for dessert after dinner.  Usually, it was a simple cake or fruit pie.  It might just have been a dish of strawberries from the back yard but a meal wasn't considered dinner unless intended with something sweet. 

Yes, children were always included. 

camlan

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #50 on: July 07, 2013, 09:06:36 AM »
I'm just perplexed by the idea that dessert is considered a standard course for an everyday family meal.  In my family, and all my friends' families, dessert was reserved for special occasions (whether at home or at a restaurant) - not a daily thing.  Do/did most families serve dessert on a daily basis?  I can see how that could interfere with not only children's digestion, but adults' as well.

Unless there is an alcohol component to the dessert in question, I don't see a reason to restrict it to adults, but just the idea of making dessert plus the meal every day would have put my mother in fits.

Growing up in the 60s, we had dessert every night. Nothing fancy, usually some cookies or brownies Mom had made, or Jello, or canned fruit. Sunday dinner dessert was usually ice cream, as a special treat. And Mom usually tucked a piece of fruit or a couple of cookies into our lunch bags as dessert. There was usually a slightly better dessert on Friday nights, to celebrate the end of the week and beginning of the weekend, like a layer cake.

But this wasn't the large amount of sweets that you might think. On a daily basis, the only sweets in the house were the cookies or brownies Mom made. We only got candy on holidays, like Christmas and Easter. We didn't have snacks like potato chips or pretzels. We had relentlessly healthy meals cooked by Mom, and fresh fruit for snacks. Sometimes we got graham crackers. I was the kid in the lunch room trading Mom's chocolate chip cookies for a Hostess cupcake, because that was the only way I'd ever get to eat one.
Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Yvaine

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #51 on: July 07, 2013, 10:18:56 PM »
I'm just perplexed by the idea that dessert is considered a standard course for an everyday family meal.  In my family, and all my friends' families, dessert was reserved for special occasions (whether at home or at a restaurant) - not a daily thing.  Do/did most families serve dessert on a daily basis?  I can see how that could interfere with not only children's digestion, but adults' as well.

Unless there is an alcohol component to the dessert in question, I don't see a reason to restrict it to adults, but just the idea of making dessert plus the meal every day would have put my mother in fits.

We usually had some kind of dessert after dinner. Most days, this wasn't extra effort from Mom--it was something that came cheaply in packages divisible by six.  ;D I remember it being Little Debbie Star Crunches a lot. Saturday nights, we had ice cream; it was kind of a celebratory "it's Saturday" thing.

magicdomino

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #52 on: July 08, 2013, 01:42:52 PM »
I'm just perplexed by the idea that dessert is considered a standard course for an everyday family meal.  In my family, and all my friends' families, dessert was reserved for special occasions (whether at home or at a restaurant) - not a daily thing.  Do/did most families serve dessert on a daily basis?  I can see how that could interfere with not only children's digestion, but adults' as well.

Unless there is an alcohol component to the dessert in question, I don't see a reason to restrict it to adults, but just the idea of making dessert plus the meal every day would have put my mother in fits.

We didn't have dessert every day, but if there was something appropriate around, we might have some. Cakes and pies were more often for a mid-afternoon snack, though.

Hmmmmm

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #53 on: July 08, 2013, 02:09:42 PM »
I'm just perplexed by the idea that dessert is considered a standard course for an everyday family meal.  In my family, and all my friends' families, dessert was reserved for special occasions (whether at home or at a restaurant) - not a daily thing.  Do/did most families serve dessert on a daily basis?  I can see how that could interfere with not only children's digestion, but adults' as well.

Unless there is an alcohol component to the dessert in question, I don't see a reason to restrict it to adults, but just the idea of making dessert plus the meal every day would have put my mother in fits.

I was born in the mid-60's. We didn't have dessert every night, but it wasn't an uncommon thing. Icecream, some fresh fruit, brownies, pudding or jello were all typical week day desserts and we probably had them a few times a week.

Sunday dinner always had some type of dessert,typically a cobbler, pie or cake. Left overs might be eaten later in the week.

With my family now, I probably make some type of dessert weekly, sometimes more often. For the 4th I made a blueberry crumble with homemade peach ice cream. Yesterday I we had fresh strawberries drizzled with balsamic vinegar.  DS is wanting strawberry icebox pie so I've already bought the ingredients and will probably make it Wednesday night. I also have some left over blueberries that are starting to go bad so I'll probably make a 3 berry sorbet tomorrow and put in the freezer.

Not sure how dessert would impact digestion. If not kept to moderation, it could be increase caloric intake, but we believe everything in moderation. I'd rather have my kids eating a bowl of ice cream than munching on chips or cookies throughout the day.

ladyknight1

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #54 on: July 08, 2013, 06:03:12 PM »
I was born in 1969 and we had some sort of sweet most nights after dinner. Usually something very simple, cookies or fruit, but occasionally my father would make his famous German chocolate cake. My mom often made sheet cakes, which are very easy.

LibraryLady

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Re: Historical etiquette question - excluding children from desserts
« Reply #55 on: July 09, 2013, 10:51:23 AM »
We always had something sweet for dessert.  That was the first thing we girls learned how to cook.  Daddy said it was "half a meal" without dessert.  If we were hungry when getting home from school, we had bread and jelly/preserves that mother/granny made during the summer.  My sister and I could make pie crusts for pie (I never use anything but Crisco) quicker that opening those horrible Pillsbury cardboard things from the refrigerator sections.  Pies, cakes, cookies; although we almost always scorched the cocoa/crisco mixture when making brownies  :-\