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Author Topic: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?  (Read 110215 times)

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MommyPenguin

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #825 on: March 23, 2015, 06:18:42 PM »
For your perusal...

http://thedailyeight.com/bizarre/8-unsolved-mysteries-of-the-world/?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=top

The Hessdalen Valley is in a busy air corridor.  The lights are landing lights from airplanes.  The Taos Hum is technically unexplained, but the causes of other "mysterious" hums around the world have been decidedly mundane: tinnitus, animals, seismic events, industrial noises, etc.  I don't know anything about 1) the aluminum wedge, 2) green-skinned people, or 3) the Pollock twins, but...
1) Out of Place Objects (or "OOParts") are frequently touted as amazing and then given to an actual expert who can explain it in a matter of minutes.
2) Argyria causes people to have bright blue skin.  Another condition that causes green skin does not seem that strange to me.
3) Confirmation bias and the flaws of human memory could easily account for the unexplained or mysterious pieces of the twins' story.

With the Pollock twins, it's also quite possible that the parents told the younger girls things (or talked to each other about things) that the younger girls picked up on, and the adults forgot they'd told it to them or didn't realize they'd overheard.  The younger girls could also be particularly clever enough to put together details (Sherlock-Holmes style) and make good guesses.

squeakers

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #826 on: March 23, 2015, 06:41:31 PM »
For your perusal...

http://thedailyeight.com/bizarre/8-unsolved-mysteries-of-the-world/?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=top

The Hessdalen Valley is in a busy air corridor.  The lights are landing lights from airplanes.  The Taos Hum is technically unexplained, but the causes of other "mysterious" hums around the world have been decidedly mundane: tinnitus, animals, seismic events, industrial noises, etc.  I don't know anything about 1) the aluminum wedge, 2) green-skinned people, or 3) the Pollock twins, but...
1) Out of Place Objects (or "OOParts") are frequently touted as amazing and then given to an actual expert who can explain it in a matter of minutes.
2) Argyria causes people to have bright blue skin.  Another condition that causes green skin does not seem that strange to me.
3) Confirmation bias and the flaws of human memory could easily account for the unexplained or mysterious pieces of the twins' story.

With the Pollock twins, it's also quite possible that the parents told the younger girls things (or talked to each other about things) that the younger girls picked up on, and the adults forgot they'd told it to them or didn't realize they'd overheard.  The younger girls could also be particularly clever enough to put together details (Sherlock-Holmes style) and make good guesses.

In the comment section of that article is someone who claims to be a grand-daughter... she says her grandfather made the story up.
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MommyPenguin

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #827 on: March 23, 2015, 10:25:21 PM »
For your perusal...

http://thedailyeight.com/bizarre/8-unsolved-mysteries-of-the-world/?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=top

The Hessdalen Valley is in a busy air corridor.  The lights are landing lights from airplanes.  The Taos Hum is technically unexplained, but the causes of other "mysterious" hums around the world have been decidedly mundane: tinnitus, animals, seismic events, industrial noises, etc.  I don't know anything about 1) the aluminum wedge, 2) green-skinned people, or 3) the Pollock twins, but...
1) Out of Place Objects (or "OOParts") are frequently touted as amazing and then given to an actual expert who can explain it in a matter of minutes.
2) Argyria causes people to have bright blue skin.  Another condition that causes green skin does not seem that strange to me.
3) Confirmation bias and the flaws of human memory could easily account for the unexplained or mysterious pieces of the twins' story.

With the Pollock twins, it's also quite possible that the parents told the younger girls things (or talked to each other about things) that the younger girls picked up on, and the adults forgot they'd told it to them or didn't realize they'd overheard.  The younger girls could also be particularly clever enough to put together details (Sherlock-Holmes style) and make good guesses.

In the comment section of that article is someone who claims to be a grand-daughter... she says her grandfather made the story up.

Or that!  :)

kherbert05

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #828 on: March 23, 2015, 11:21:00 PM »
For your perusal...

http://thedailyeight.com/bizarre/8-unsolved-mysteries-of-the-world/?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=top

The Hessdalen Valley is in a busy air corridor.  The lights are landing lights from airplanes.  The Taos Hum is technically unexplained, but the causes of other "mysterious" hums around the world have been decidedly mundane: tinnitus, animals, seismic events, industrial noises, etc.  I don't know anything about 1) the aluminum wedge, 2) green-skinned people, or 3) the Pollock twins, but...
1) Out of Place Objects (or "OOParts") are frequently touted as amazing and then given to an actual expert who can explain it in a matter of minutes.
2) Argyria causes people to have bright blue skin.  Another condition that causes green skin does not seem that strange to me.
3) Confirmation bias and the flaws of human memory could easily account for the unexplained or mysterious pieces of the twins' story.

With the Pollock twins, it's also quite possible that the parents told the younger girls things (or talked to each other about things) that the younger girls picked up on, and the adults forgot they'd told it to them or didn't realize they'd overheard.  The younger girls could also be particularly clever enough to put together details (Sherlock-Holmes style) and make good guesses.
This unless the story about the grandfather making it up is true. I've shocked older relatives with the stories I knew from before I was born. It was simple. I don't sleep well in strange places. I would curl up in a corner and after all the other cousins were asleep, the adults would start telling the deep secret stories. Some I did't understand till years later.
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ddawn23

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #829 on: March 24, 2015, 01:07:59 AM »
For your perusal...

http://thedailyeight.com/bizarre/8-unsolved-mysteries-of-the-world/?utm_source=outbrain&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=top

The Hessdalen Valley is in a busy air corridor.  The lights are landing lights from airplanes.  The Taos Hum is technically unexplained, but the causes of other "mysterious" hums around the world have been decidedly mundane: tinnitus, animals, seismic events, industrial noises, etc.  I don't know anything about 1) the aluminum wedge, 2) green-skinned people, or 3) the Pollock twins, but...
1) Out of Place Objects (or "OOParts") are frequently touted as amazing and then given to an actual expert who can explain it in a matter of minutes.
2) Argyria causes people to have bright blue skin.  Another condition that causes green skin does not seem that strange to me.
3) Confirmation bias and the flaws of human memory could easily account for the unexplained or mysterious pieces of the twins' story.

With the Pollock twins, it's also quite possible that the parents told the younger girls things (or talked to each other about things) that the younger girls picked up on, and the adults forgot they'd told it to them or didn't realize they'd overheard.  The younger girls could also be particularly clever enough to put together details (Sherlock-Holmes style) and make good guesses.
This unless the story about the grandfather making it up is true. I've shocked older relatives with the stories I knew from before I was born. It was simple. I don't sleep well in strange places. I would curl up in a corner and after all the other cousins were asleep, the adults would start telling the deep secret stories. Some I did't understand till years later.

Last year my grandparents and most of their kids and grandkids were sitting around visiting when my grandfather told us a story from WWII.  He spent a good part of the war serving in Italy.  At one point one of his buddies had become chummy with a local family that lived in a farmhouse somewhere near the camp.  The buddy got the family to throw a dinner party for him, my grandpa, and a few of their friends.  They pulled out all the stops and it was a wonderful evening made all the more special by how removed they all were from the comforts of home.  Resources were scarce for the Italian family too, and they'd asked each of the soldiers to contribute.  The price, my grandfather said, had been well worth it.  He ends the story by asking, "Do you know how much they charged us?"

I spoke up: "A pack of cigarettes."
"That's right!" he replied, visibly impressed.  And then I noticed every other eye in the house on me.  Everyone wanted to know how on earth I knew that.  Grandpa never talks about the war or about Korea.  Never.  I swore, and still swear, that he told that story a couple of years ago.  I swear just about everybody in the room had been there the last time too.  All 12-15 of them swear up and down they've never heard it before.  I can't believe they don't remember it since it is the only story he's ever told us about the war.  They say they couldn't possibly have heard it before because they would never forget him breaking his silence.  It's a stalemate.

VorFemme

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #830 on: March 24, 2015, 06:38:57 PM »
Well, from what I understand - a package of cigarettes or a chocolate bar from the ration packs were good "currency" at the time.  If you knew that and made a guess - then you had a good chance of being right - since most guys did not run around with silk stockings in their duffle bags unless they were inveterate traders...or something...but those three things would have been my first three guesses and none of my grandfathers went off to WWII (paternal GF was a farmer in his early forties and maternal GF was a bit younger with two daughters - three before the end of the war - who happened to be a petroleum engineer in the West Texas oil fields - he wanted to go off to war & volunteered at least twice, but kept being sent back to the oil fields).

I grew up reading stories of WWII soldiers, for some reason - wonder if they were at the maternal grandparents' house, since Grandfather had wanted to go so badly...
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ddawn23

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #831 on: March 25, 2015, 01:32:45 AM »
Well, from what I understand - a package of cigarettes or a chocolate bar from the ration packs were good "currency" at the time.  If you knew that and made a guess - then you had a good chance of being right - since most guys did not run around with silk stockings in their duffle bags unless they were inveterate traders...or something...but those three things would have been my first three guesses and none of my grandfathers went off to WWII (paternal GF was a farmer in his early forties and maternal GF was a bit younger with two daughters - three before the end of the war - who happened to be a petroleum engineer in the West Texas oil fields - he wanted to go off to war & volunteered at least twice, but kept being sent back to the oil fields).

I grew up reading stories of WWII soldiers, for some reason - wonder if they were at the maternal grandparents' house, since Grandfather had wanted to go so badly...
That's precisely my point.  It's not about me knowing the answer-- it's about me having a clear memory of an event that the others present in my memory swear never happened.  There are a myriad of ways I could be mistaken.  Maybe Grandpa had only told the story to me.  Maybe he and his friends weren't the only soldiers who got a home-cooked meal for the price of a pack of cigarettes and I heard someone else's story and my memory attached it to my grandfather.  Maybe he told the story to a different set of family members and I was the only overlap.  The fact that a dozen or so people explicitly contradict my memory is really good evidence that it's a false memory.  But I know he told us that story before.  The article in PP's link calls the story of the Pollock twins bizarre and includes it in a list of "unsolved mysteries of the world," but the evidence for it boils down to "I know I never told them that."  Which, for me at least, is about as compelling of an unsolved mystery as "I know I left my glasses around here somewhere."

VorFemme

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #832 on: March 25, 2015, 06:36:10 PM »
Well, from what I understand - a package of cigarettes or a chocolate bar from the ration packs were good "currency" at the time.  If you knew that and made a guess - then you had a good chance of being right - since most guys did not run around with silk stockings in their duffle bags unless they were inveterate traders...or something...but those three things would have been my first three guesses and none of my grandfathers went off to WWII (paternal GF was a farmer in his early forties and maternal GF was a bit younger with two daughters - three before the end of the war - who happened to be a petroleum engineer in the West Texas oil fields - he wanted to go off to war & volunteered at least twice, but kept being sent back to the oil fields).

I grew up reading stories of WWII soldiers, for some reason - wonder if they were at the maternal grandparents' house, since Grandfather had wanted to go so badly...
That's precisely my point.  It's not about me knowing the answer-- it's about me having a clear memory of an event that the others present in my memory swear never happened.  There are a myriad of ways I could be mistaken.  Maybe Grandpa had only told the story to me.  Maybe he and his friends weren't the only soldiers who got a home-cooked meal for the price of a pack of cigarettes and I heard someone else's story and my memory attached it to my grandfather.  Maybe he told the story to a different set of family members and I was the only overlap.  The fact that a dozen or so people explicitly contradict my memory is really good evidence that it's a false memory.  But I know he told us that story before.  The article in PP's link calls the story of the Pollock twins bizarre and includes it in a list of "unsolved mysteries of the world," but the evidence for it boils down to "I know I never told them that."  Which, for me at least, is about as compelling of an unsolved mystery as "I know I left my glasses around here somewhere."

People don't always remember things as accurately as they think that they do - such as my dear husband, VorGuy, insisting that I was the last one to have the missing car keys because he has the keychain without a fob and the remaining key is on a keychain without a fob.

I offered to put the clear acrylic faceted heart the size of a baby's fist back on the keychain - I'd removed it & put it on the keychain with my house keys because he has a quirk about minimizing what goes into his pockets...including no fobs on keychains.  I, on the other hand, find fobs make it easier to find that set of keys...the clear acrylic faceted heart is shiny enough to find even in a room that is dimly lit...the facets reflect light nicely.

Or my parents, telling me that I did something that my sister and I remember clearly that she did.  For the last twenty years...repeatedly.
« Last Edit: March 25, 2015, 06:37:42 PM by VorFemme »
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ddawn23

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #833 on: March 26, 2015, 02:19:56 AM »
People don't always remember things as accurately as they think that they do
I feel like we're going around in circles here.  My argument must have gotten lost in the narrative.  I'm actually agreeing with you.  The Pollock twins are being included in a list of crazy unsolved mysteries as if there's something out of the ordinary or even supernatural at play.  But it's far more likely that what's actually at play is simply false memories and the vagaries of the human mind.  And since everybody on earth misremembers things there's really nothing in the Pollack twin story to merit its inclusion in a list of bizarre mysteries.

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #834 on: March 26, 2015, 08:05:29 AM »
They're now saying that the plane that went down over the Alps was crashed deliberately.

The co pilot locked the pilot out of the cockpit and he was desperately trying to gain access as the plane went down.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-32063587

The poor passengers and their families...  :'(
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VorFemme

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #835 on: March 26, 2015, 09:46:04 AM »
People don't always remember things as accurately as they think that they do
I feel like we're going around in circles here.  My argument must have gotten lost in the narrative.  I'm actually agreeing with you.  The Pollock twins are being included in a list of crazy unsolved mysteries as if there's something out of the ordinary or even supernatural at play.  But it's far more likely that what's actually at play is simply false memories and the vagaries of the human mind.  And since everybody on earth misremembers things there's really nothing in the Pollack twin story to merit its inclusion in a list of bizarre mysteries.

Nope - trying to come up with a couple of more recent anecdotes...

Now, the cases in India where the child asks about unrelated families living a few miles away, that their current (best word I can come up with) family does not know anything about until the small child asks after them...well, that is a bit harder to explain away.

Pollock twins might easily have stayed awake during part of a nap or not gone to sleep as quickly as anyone thought and been awake to overhear things being said about how much they looked or acted like the previous twins and the various toys that they then asked after were mentioned in the conversation as still being in the house, but put away....

Kids can hear comments about things like that to an astonishing degree - where "wash your hands" or "don't touch that" can't be heard at all...
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Twik

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #836 on: March 26, 2015, 10:16:56 AM »
They're now saying that the plane that went down over the Alps was crashed deliberately.

The co pilot locked the pilot out of the cockpit and he was desperately trying to gain access as the plane went down.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-32063587

The poor passengers and their families...  :'(

I was just thinking that this turned from a tragedy to a tragic mystery.
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ddawn23

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Re: What real-life mystery/crime would you most like the answer to?
« Reply #837 on: March 26, 2015, 12:21:44 PM »
It's still early days.  I'm confident the investigation will uncover the truth in the end.  Unfortunately a commercial airliner crashing due to pilot or airline employee suicide is not without precedent:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EgyptAir_Flight_990 (217 fatalities)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SilkAir_Flight_185 (104 fatalities)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_Southwest_Airlines_Flight_1771 (43 fatalities)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAM_Mozambique_Airlines_Flight_470 (33 fatalities)