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  • October 17, 2017, 10:58:09 AM

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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1206469 times)

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jaxsue

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If this has already come up, my apologies.

My parents are from Canada. They are English-Canadian, a very important distinction for Canadians (at least it used to be!). I have lost count of how many people have asked me how I understand Canadians. They all speak french, don't they?  :o

Add to that, the assumption that they all live in igloos in a permanent winter. Oy.

Luci

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Thanks for the thorough explaination. I sounds fast and uncluttered!

In our school, theft was such a problem that we didn't even let the kids bring anything to school except the usual small school supplies. I don't know how they handle it now.

kherbert05

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Thanks for the thorough explaination. I sounds fast and uncluttered!

In our school, theft was such a problem that we didn't even let the kids bring anything to school except the usual small school supplies. I don't know how they handle it now.
We have had a problem with theft but it was from outsiders. A few years ago our school was broken into 7 times. A group of 3rd graders, who had their portable broken into came up with a plan. They presented the teacher with a schedule for the next long weekend (break ins happened on school holidays). They were going to stake out their room with their parents. They just needed the teacher to let the first family in, and they could let the 2nd family in and so on.

Of course that didn't happen, but the cops had the same idea and they caught the thieves. The cops were also pleasantly surprised at the large number of calls they received reporting suspicious activity on campus from the apartments next door. They generally have trouble getting cooperation from the residents who fear the gang members that live there also. Apparently messing with our school going to far, and they did call to report activity.

When we leave my room all personal electronics, except my school laptop are locked in a closet. That helps with making sure the kids keep up with them and that they don't leave them in the cafeteria, bathroom, or specials classes. All classes k-5 are self contained, the only kids that switch teachers for academics are SPED students who are mainstreamed for some classes and with SPED or lifeskills teachers for other classes..
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

AstiTheWestie

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I think one of the problems is that it's much harder than it used to be to know which lights are important and which are not.
I know in my manual when you look up various lights/warnings it often says "contact your dealer" so doesn't even tell you what the specific light is related to, and it's very hard to know whether it's a "stop right there, do not attempt to drive at all until it's been checked" and which are "get it checked as soon as you can and drive with a little more care than usual in the mean time"

I'm lucky that the garage which looks after my car are very good, and so I can phone them to say "this light has some on, this is what I was doing, is it safe for me to drive it straight to you now / wait and make an appointment to pop in  next week or do I need to call the RAC now? Becuase the guidance in the instruction manual does not give any clue as to which of those is likely to apply

I once hired a van, to move house. We were about 20 minutes into our 5 hour journey when the engine management light came on. You know, one of the ones where the manual says "Stop. Do not pass go. Do not attempt to collect $200. Call out a tow truck"

Turned out that it was a faulty connection to the bulb of the warning light . (the bit which infuriated me was that (a) several of the guys at the hire co. KNEW this, but didn't bother to mention it to us when we picked up the van (b) the company were angry that I wasn't willing to just drive off in the hope that the engine wasn't about to seize up & leave me and all my worldly goods stranded half way across the country (this was before they checked it and found it was a loose connection, of spoke to the guys that knew that)

Fortunately it came on when we were close to another of their locations, so we got them to check it. The guy who checked it seemed bemused that I insisted on his making and signing a note to say he had checked it, it was a faulty connection not a fault with the engine, and that he was instructing us to ignore it. Did I not believe him?
 (Why yes, I had read the small print of the hire agreement about what circumstances would mean we were liable for any damage to the van:-)

I just married my mechanic. Problem solved. Although it helped that we really are in love, and just celebrated 26 years together. I would recommend it!

Slartibartfast

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My daughter didn't realize until she was in college that Alaska wasn't an island. 

In her school they used pull down maps rather than globes and they would have a picture of the continental United States with a little box at the upper left showing Alaska and a little box at the bottom left showing Hawaii.  Since she knew Hawaii was a group of islands and was therefore separated from the land mass of the rest of the U.S., she had always assumed that Alaska was one too and that's why it wasn't shown 'connected' to the rest of the U.S.

This probably belongs in the "obvious things you've just learned thread" since I'm admitting to my own ignorance, but it's related to the story above. I just learned last week that North Korea and South Korea are on the northeast side of China, right near Japan. I always thought they were southwest of China, far away from Japan (sort of in the area of Thailand). I would have bet money on it, but I was very wrong.

I've looked at maps of Asia plenty of times, so it took me awhile to figure out where I had gotten the idea that N & S Korea were southwest of China. Whenever you see a map of Korea (e.g., in the paper, on the news), it focuses in on the two countries and shows that North Korea shares a northern border with China. It's not until you zoom way out that you realize that, although North Korea borders China on the North, it's still on the far northeast side of China. And some of the larger maps of Asia I saw only labeled one or two countries (e.g., usually China and one or two others, at most), so my incorrect belief wasn't corrected when I saw the larger maps. Now I know - zoom out if you want to know where something is, zoom out!

New to me - thanks!  I would have said the same thing - that North and South Korea were further south, toward the archipelago stretching downward toward Australia.  I had no idea South Korea and Japan were so close!

MommyPenguin

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I am learning *so* much about world geography from homeschooling my kids.  I think I retain a lot more than they do, having some knowledge of the countries ahead of time.  There are puzzles that have all the countries and the pieces are shaped like the countries (GeoPuzzle makes some, which are my favorite for little kids, although The Global Puzzle is my favorite for me and challenging even for adults!), and it's amazing how much you retain just from doing the puzzle a few times!  I think something about making the piece fit with the water and the countries near it really helps you see the borders of each country and how they fit together, what countries touch the water, what countries touch each other, etc.  It's a great way to learn geography!
Emily is 10 years old!  1/07
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jedikaiti

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When I was a kid, I had a game - Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego - for my Commodore 64 (I know, I'm dating myself). It came with a world almanac and was a GREAT way to learn geography. And a bit about political and monetary systems and languages, too.
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

A.P. Wulfric

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You've all just discovered why I love, love LOVE teaching geography. :)

Many kids are genuinely enthusiastic about learning real people and real places.  That most Egyptians don't ride camels to and from work, and that they do not live in pyramids.  That the great wall is huge, but in the far northern region of China, and that Macau still looks very Portuguese.  Oh, and that Berlin Wall was in Berlin, and did not divide East and West Germany, and that the iron curtain was figurative, not literal.

We have many South Asian families in my district, and they love talking about India (or Pakistan, Sri Lanka, etc.) and how no, they didn't "know" each other before moving here, and just because they are all from India, no, they can't all communicate in any one language except....English.  One of my kids was from Goa this year, and blew everyone away by talking to the Brazilian kid in Portuguese.  I love it!

(and yes, to answer the question that everyone asks me, I can name and locate every country in the world and its capital.)

cabbageweevil

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(and yes, to answer the question that everyone asks me, I can name and locate every country in the world and its capital.)
That's impressive: I think I'm fairly good in that sphere, but the above is not a claim I'd be ready to make. (And I won't challenge you to "single combat" on this subject -- if only because I'm pretty sure that I would lose !)

Layla Miller

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When I was a kid, I had a game - Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego - for my Commodore 64 (I know, I'm dating myself). It came with a world almanac and was a GREAT way to learn geography. And a bit about political and monetary systems and languages, too.

Oh!  I think I had that game, too.  Or something like it.  Or maybe I only had Where in the USA is Carmen Sandiego, because that game is the reason Tulsa, Oklahoma is forever linked to the image of oil derricks in my mind.  ;D
I searched for nothing on the Internet and got 175,000,000 hits.

that_one_girl

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I clean house for an elderly lady who has two adult daughters.  Daughter2 came to visit her mother and we were chatting about Daughter1's vacation. The following conversation ensued:
D2: My sister is on vacation, so if you need more cleaning supplies, call me, not her.
Me: oh okay, I wish I could go on vacation.
D2: Me too.  I wish I had enough money to go out of the country like my sister.
Me: oh, where did she go?
D2: Hawaii
Me: *facepalm*

Dazi

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When I was a kid, I had a game - Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego - for my Commodore 64 (I know, I'm dating myself). It came with a world almanac and was a GREAT way to learn geography. And a bit about political and monetary systems and languages, too.

Totally loved that game!   ;D
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PastryGoddess

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When I was a kid, I had a game - Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego - for my Commodore 64 (I know, I'm dating myself). It came with a world almanac and was a GREAT way to learn geography. And a bit about political and monetary systems and languages, too.

There was a show on TV called Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego.  I loved loved loved watching it!

Pen^2

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We had an awesome geography teacher at school. If there were 5 minutes to fill at the end of class, he would get us to stand up and we'd play this country game. Basically, we'd choose a random letter, and then have to go around the class saying in turn the name of either a country or a capital which starts with that letter. No repeats were allowed. If you couldn't think of one, or if you took too long (about 5 seconds), you had to sit down. The last person standing got a small chocolate.

We probably only did it once a week or so, but the hope of that chocolate helped me learn more countries than anything else ever had. You'd be surprised how sophisticated the strategies became, also. And I'll always know how to spell tricky countries with silent first letters, like Djibouti, too :)

readingchick

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When I was a kid, I had a game - Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego - for my Commodore 64 (I know, I'm dating myself). It came with a world almanac and was a GREAT way to learn geography. And a bit about political and monetary systems and languages, too.

There was a show on TV called Where in the World is Carmen Sandiego.  I loved loved loved watching it!

I loved it too! That's how I learned some obscure world capitols!