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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1136526 times)

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squeakers

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1275 on: December 08, 2013, 09:17:37 PM »
I had someone ask me whether my baby was a boy or a girl.

The baby was naked at the time  :o.

I have a great-nephew that you couldn't tell if he was a boy or girl until he was old enough you wouldn't see him naked.  Physical differences are what makes the world go around  8)
"I feel sarcasm is the lowest form of wit." "It is so low, in fact, that Miss Manners feels sure you would not want to resort to it yourself, even in your own defense. We do not believe in retaliatory rudeness." Judith Martin

Pen^2

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1276 on: December 08, 2013, 09:33:47 PM »
I had someone ask me whether my baby was a boy or a girl.

The baby was naked at the time  :o.
This reminds me of a friend of mine from school. When she was born, she didn't breathe for a brief spell. Obviously she eventually did and it was all fine, but until then, she turned blue. Her father, who was in the room, shouted happily at his suffocating newborn, "Oh look! Blue means it's a boy!"

Elfmama

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1277 on: December 08, 2013, 10:21:53 PM »
I had someone ask me whether my baby was a boy or a girl.

The baby was naked at the time  :o .
Was this an adult?  Because I think that's only allowable if the person asking is under 10 and does not know that the other sex is built differently from their own.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
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WolfWay

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1278 on: December 09, 2013, 03:21:10 AM »
When I was at university there were a couple of students where he was FirstName Father'sLastName and she was FirstName Mother'sLastName. I remember them as being from one of the Nordic countries but it was a long time ago and that may be wrong. Certainly they said that was normal for their culture, and that it was taking the university some time to comprehend that John Smith and Mary Jones were twins. it didn't help, or maybe it did, that while obviously they weren't identical twins, physically they were very much alike.
They might have been from Iceland, where the children's last name is their parent's first name with a suffix specifying -son or -dottir (daughter).

So John Smith and Mary Brown's children would be named Bob Johnson and Sally Johnsdottir (i.e. John's daughter). Bob Johnson's children in turn would have the lastname Bobson or Bobsdottir.

It could be that the parents decided to split the naming between the two parent's so the son has the father's name (Bob Johnson) but the sister had the mothers name (Sally Marysdottir).
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cabbageweevil

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1279 on: December 09, 2013, 03:52:18 AM »
I went to primary school, with twins.  One was called Marion Mary, and the other Mary Marion..  We called them both ' MM'

At my, all-male, school, there were identical twins called R.P. [last name]  and R.P.G. [last name].  It was an old-fashioned school, with standard practice for pupils to go by their last names only; I wasn't well acquainted with them, and never knew their given names.  It would seem on the face of it, though -- as with your MMs -- that the parents had been intent on "making confusion yet more confounded".

cabbageweevil

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1280 on: December 09, 2013, 04:00:53 AM »
When I was at university there were a couple of students where he was FirstName Father'sLastName and she was FirstName Mother'sLastName. I remember them as being from one of the Nordic countries but it was a long time ago and that may be wrong. Certainly they said that was normal for their culture, and that it was taking the university some time to comprehend that John Smith and Mary Jones were twins. it didn't help, or maybe it did, that while obviously they weren't identical twins, physically they were very much alike.
They might have been from Iceland, where the children's last name is their parent's first name with a suffix specifying -son or -dottir (daughter).

So John Smith and Mary Brown's children would be named Bob Johnson and Sally Johnsdottir (i.e. John's daughter). Bob Johnson's children in turn would have the lastname Bobson or Bobsdottir.

It could be that the parents decided to split the naming between the two parent's so the son has the father's name (Bob Johnson) but the sister had the mothers name (Sally Marysdottir).

WolfWay, you've cleared something up for me here -- thanks.  I recently came across a thriller -- which proved boring to me, I'm afraid -- translated from the Icelandic of one Arnaldur Indridason. I knew about the Icelandic -son / -dottir practice, but had been given to understand that the "suffix-ing" was always done to the father's name; and "Indrida" seemed plainly, a woman's name -- leaving me a little puzzled.  But I learn now, that it can happen that the mother's name is thus used.

I gather that the telephone directory in Iceland is listed by people's given names...

Margo

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1281 on: December 09, 2013, 04:44:26 AM »
My cousin's husband is from Malaysia but moved to the UK to go to school - he uses his father's forename name as his surname, which I assume is fairly standard.

As he and my cousin are settled in the UK they both use that as their surname. (The children both have am English christian name, Malaysian middle name and the same surname)

 I think in general people are more flexible over how they chose to name their children. One of my aunts kept her own name when she married - the children (one born before they married, one after) both have her surname, no that of my uncle. And I've met quite a lot of people who either have daughters taking mother's name and sons taking father's name, or simply alternating

Ereine

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1282 on: December 09, 2013, 04:46:45 AM »
I think that the use of a mother's name can mean that the person is illegitimate, at least that was the convention in Finland.

iridaceae

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1283 on: December 09, 2013, 05:57:35 AM »

WolfWay, you've cleared something up for me here -- thanks.  I recently came across a thriller -- which proved boring to me, I'm afraid -- translated from the Icelandic of one Arnaldur Indridason. I knew about the Icelandic -son / -dottir practice, but had been given to understand that the "suffix-ing" was always done to the father's name; and "Indrida" seemed plainly, a woman's name -- leaving me a little puzzled.  But I learn now, that it can happen that the mother's name is thus used.

I don't know if Indrida is male or female (google is not being much help) but remember that not all languages consider female names to be the only ones ending in an a.

Think of: Luca, Ezra, Andrea,  Chinua, Attila, Rama and Abdulla.
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cabbageweevil

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1284 on: December 09, 2013, 08:56:24 AM »
Ereine, iridaceae: thanks for the thoughts.  My impression (based on no deep knowledge) about Scandinavian countries and languages, is that names ending in -a are more likely to be female there, than male: but I could be making an "interesting assumption".

Lynn2000

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1285 on: December 09, 2013, 09:31:51 AM »
I think in general people are more flexible over how they chose to name their children. One of my aunts kept her own name when she married - the children (one born before they married, one after) both have her surname, no that of my uncle. And I've met quite a lot of people who either have daughters taking mother's name and sons taking father's name, or simply alternating

I mentioned this earlier, but my friend and her husband have two children (both born after they were married). The first child has the father's last name and the second child has the mother's last name. (My friend did not change her name upon marriage.) So the parents are Amy Adams and Bob Barker, and the kids are Carl Barker and David Adams. Thus two people in the household are Adams and two are Barker.

Personally I'm not a big fan... There's so many situations now where the names are just inherently complex (blended families, for example), it seems silly to me to intentionally create complexity. But, on the other hand, I think it's more of a personal preference, definitely not rising to the level of naming your kid Felon (in an English-speaking place) or something like that.
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Outdoor Girl

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1286 on: December 09, 2013, 09:42:53 AM »
When my brother and SIL got married, she kept her maiden name.  When their first child was born, they gave him both last names - hers-his.  When their second child was born, they actually considered giving him his-hers as his surname.  Fortunately, saner heads prevailed and both boys have the same last name.  It is much easier.

Although, they may end up with different names after all.  The oldest one is considering an official name change, dropping his mother's name and just going with his Dad's.  The younger one may decide to follow suit, though.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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Hillia

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1287 on: December 09, 2013, 09:53:23 AM »
I didn't mean to create confusion when we named DS, but unintentionally a little crept in.  His name is Robert Percival Albus Hillia  (ok, that would actually be an awesome name :-) ).  We always called him Percy.  When he hit the middle school 'my parents are idiots' phase, he decided that he wanted to go by Robert and has stuck with it.  It was a little bumpy for awhile as we transitioned, and I still call him Percy in general, but I do try to remember he's Robert to friends, teachers, and coworkers.

Elfmama

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1288 on: December 09, 2013, 10:09:57 AM »
When I was at university there were a couple of students where he was FirstName Father'sLastName and she was FirstName Mother'sLastName. I remember them as being from one of the Nordic countries but it was a long time ago and that may be wrong. Certainly they said that was normal for their culture, and that it was taking the university some time to comprehend that John Smith and Mary Jones were twins. it didn't help, or maybe it did, that while obviously they weren't identical twins, physically they were very much alike.
They might have been from Iceland, where the children's last name is their parent's first name with a suffix specifying -son or -dottir (daughter).

So John Smith and Mary Brown's children would be named Bob Johnson and Sally Johnsdottir (i.e. John's daughter). Bob Johnson's children in turn would have the lastname Bobson or Bobsdottir.

It could be that the parents decided to split the naming between the two parent's so the son has the father's name (Bob Johnson) but the sister had the mothers name (Sally Marysdottir).
That's a holdover from the viking-era (and earlier) Norse naming practices.  It's a particular book-peeve of mine when a historical novel is laid in that era and place, but does not understand the naming practices.  (Yes, Catherine Coulter, I'm looking at YOU.)  There is no "Haraldsson family" and Ragnar Haraldsson's wife is NOT Inga Haraldsson -- she's Inga Eriksdottir.   (Disclaimer: I've just pulled Norse names out of the air here.  Don't remember if they were the actual names used, but Coulter did both of those things. Oh, and also fell into the trap of using "Viking" as if it was the name of the people, instead of a job description.)
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

Hmmmmm

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1289 on: December 09, 2013, 10:21:53 AM »
I didn't mean to create confusion when we named DS, but unintentionally a little crept in.  His name is Robert Percival Albus Hillia  (ok, that would actually be an awesome name :-) ).  We always called him Percy.  When he hit the middle school 'my parents are idiots' phase, he decided that he wanted to go by Robert and has stuck with it.  It was a little bumpy for awhile as we transitioned, and I still call him Percy in general, but I do try to remember he's Robert to friends, teachers, and coworkers.

I think this is pretty common at least in our family. My dad's family always called him by a shortened version of his middle name. But once he left home he started going by his first name. My mom didn't like her first name and had her family switch to her middle name by the time she started school so she always went by it. I doubt most people except relatives even knew it wasn't her first name. My DH's brother's family always called him by his middle name but when he started school his teachers used his first name and he never corrected them so outside the family he is firstname but inside he is still middle name. We call my son by his middle name and gave him the option of switching to his first name when he started school, switched to a new elementary, discussed again when he moved to middle school. But he likes his middle name and has stuck with it pretty much. I guess when he starts his professional life he can make a decision again but I doubt he'll ever switch. When our DD was little, we used both her first and middle name so she could decide which one she liked best. She chose her first name and only her first name. She refuses to go by any of the more common nicknames associated with it.