Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 304053 times)

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kherbert05

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1365 on: December 13, 2013, 07:41:39 PM »
I also feel compelled to mention that this is the woman who, when riding in my car with me to go to lunch, refused to put on her seatbelt.  We have a click-it-or-ticket law in my state so I simply put it in park and told her I wouldn't be driving anywhere until she buckled in.  Is seatbelt safety optional in her mind?  I thought this was something everybody learned when you outgrew your carseat/booster seats?

Carseat? Booster seat? What are these things (says myself, from a 1960s perspective)? Doesn't everyone just pile the kids in the back seat, and let them rattle around like popcorn?

I don't know how old your MIL is, but it's quite possible she remembers seatbelts as being optional as a child, and has never really processed that they are no longer a choice.

MIL is about 65 and I assumed they had some form of baby safety devices in her youth, even if they've changed drastically over the years.  How else did you transport infants and toddlers around in the 1950s/60s?  ???  (I am sorry but I freely admit I am ignorant of vintage safety devices).


One Friday nights my parents loaded my wooden playpen into the back of the station wagon, put me in it and drove to Canyon Lake to take care of my grandparents. They had these little seats that hooked over the back of the front seat but weren't secured in any way for toddlers. By 3 or 4 I was just rolling around on the backseat. Climbing up and laying on the ledge behind the back seat in a 2 door car was always fun -till your parent hollered at you to get down because s/he couldn't see.


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marcel

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1366 on: December 13, 2013, 07:58:14 PM »
Born in 1962, and the only reason we weren't allowed to ride on the back shelf was because it blocked Mom's view.

(Older cars had a shelf behind the back seat where you could put packages, etc)
New cars have these as well, it is a matter of model, not age whether a car has this or not.
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baglady

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1367 on: December 13, 2013, 09:17:40 PM »
I was born in 1958. I remember being about 3 or 4 and riding in a car seat, but it was more toy than safety device. It had a fake steering wheel -- think Maggie's car seat in the intro to "The Simpsons."

For the next few years I rode in the front seat between my parents. Most cars had bench seats front and back in those days -- "bucket" seats were only in sports cars, and my parents were not sports car people.

By the time I was 6 or so, I was riding free range in the back seat -- no carseat or belt. My aunt was my most frequent sitter back then, and she didn't come to our house; I was left at hers. It was SOP for my parents to have a pillow and blanket in the back seat so I could sleep on the way home from her house.

It was in the late '70s/early '80s that car seats meeting safety standards became mandatory for little ones. Shortly afterward, seat belts became the law in the state I was living in (New York). I never wore a belt until it became the law -- now I feel naked without one.

Bagman was a stickler for belts for a long time before it became the law. After it did, his mother -- who wasn't a belt person -- would buckle up when he took her places, because "she didn't want to get him in trouble." He never bothered to tell her that in our state, it was the passenger who would get in trouble for not buckling up (provided she was an adult) -- if her misguided belief got her to buckle up, that was good enough for him.

To this day, when I'm a passenger, I dip my head when the driver is backing up, even if I'm in the front seat. All those years of being a kid in the back seat and being told to do it so Dad could see.
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BB-VA

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1368 on: December 13, 2013, 09:38:45 PM »
 My car seat looked a lot like this one:

http://www.pinterest.com/pin/185773553352027665/

But I was older than this baby when I used it.  It really was a lot like Maggie Simpsons, horn on the steering wheel and all.
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Psychopoesie

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1369 on: December 13, 2013, 10:13:14 PM »
Grew up in 1970s Australia. Mum's car was a station wagon (Holden Special from some time in the 60s). Bench seats, no seat belts - front or rear. No child car seat ever.

The inside of the car looked like this (without the belts and much less fancy).



I was free range in the back, tending to hang over the front seat to talk to Mum.

On long trips - pillows and blankets in the wagon part of the car (or the back tray as Mum called it).

Now, I can't imagine not buckling up my seatbelt.

Elfmama

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1370 on: December 13, 2013, 11:13:42 PM »
I also feel compelled to mention that this is the woman who, when riding in my car with me to go to lunch, refused to put on her seatbelt.  We have a click-it-or-ticket law in my state so I simply put it in park and told her I wouldn't be driving anywhere until she buckled in.  Is seatbelt safety optional in her mind?  I thought this was something everybody learned when you outgrew your carseat/booster seats?
There are a lot of people of her generation who were taught by their parents that they were safer without seatbelts.  That without a seatbelt, you would be "thrown clear" in an accident and not be trapped in a burning car.  (Hollywood and TV have taught us, you see, that ALL cars catch on fire even in a fender-bender.  If you go off a cliff, your car might even burst into flames in mid-air!)
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BarensMom

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1371 on: December 14, 2013, 03:41:24 AM »
I was born in 1958. I remember being about 3 or 4 and riding in a car seat, but it was more toy than safety device. It had a fake steering wheel -- think Maggie's car seat in the intro to "The Simpsons."

For the next few years I rode in the front seat between my parents. Most cars had bench seats front and back in those days -- "bucket" seats were only in sports cars, and my parents were not sports car people.

By the time I was 6 or so, I was riding free range in the back seat -- no carseat or belt. My aunt was my most frequent sitter back then, and she didn't come to our house; I was left at hers. It was SOP for my parents to have a pillow and blanket in the back seat so I could sleep on the way home from her house.

It was in the late '70s/early '80s that car seats meeting safety standards became mandatory for little ones. Shortly afterward, seat belts became the law in the state I was living in (New York). I never wore a belt until it became the law -- now I feel naked without one.

Bagman was a stickler for belts for a long time before it became the law. After it did, his mother -- who wasn't a belt person -- would buckle up when he took her places, because "she didn't want to get him in trouble." He never bothered to tell her that in our state, it was the passenger who would get in trouble for not buckling up (provided she was an adult) -- if her misguided belief got her to buckle up, that was good enough for him.

To this day, when I'm a passenger, I dip my head when the driver is backing up, even if I'm in the front seat. All those years of being a kid in the back seat and being told to do it so Dad could see.

I was also born in 1958, and my experience is similar to Baglady's.  My parents had a 1960 Chevy Belair with that hard metal dashboard.  I was free-range all over that car - started out in the back seat with my sister, we'd get into a fight, then I would push myself up and over into the front between my parents, sometimes standing with my hands on the dash to play with the radio.  If I got bored, Pop would push his seat back a bit and he put me on his lap and "I'd drive."  Then I'd roll back over and resume fighting with my sister, then the process would be repeated.

I don't remember having a car with seat belts until Pop got a 1970 Cadillac Coupe de Ville. They would make me wear the lap belt and the pressure of the belt on my stomach would make me barf.

According to today's standards, it's a wonder Baglady and I survived.

TootsNYC

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1372 on: December 14, 2013, 11:28:49 AM »

According to today's standards, it's a wonder Baglady and I survived.

Well, some of your peers did not--which is why we have today's standards. You guys were the lucky ones. The dead ones aren't here to tell us that they died because they didn't have a carseat.

I remember that we had a car seat of some kind for my little sister, who was born in 1968, and it was regarded as sort of a novelty, and it was new, which means there weren't a lot of used or hand-me-down ones (and that we must not have had one left over from little brother, born in 1964).


Regarding not wearing seatbelts--we had a relative who tried to refuse to use one, but she wanted to *hold the belt buckle* down right next to the clip. So she got all the discomfort of a seatbelt, plus the added discomfort of holding it, and none of the safety. My MIL always had to say, "I can't start the car until you clip it."
   But it always amazed me that she was willing to hold the belt in position, as though that was a more comfortable alternative somehow.

Betelnut

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1373 on: December 14, 2013, 12:09:44 PM »
Now we need to start a "buckle your dog" campaign.  It always makes me wince to see dogs unrestrained in a car.
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MommyPenguin

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1374 on: December 14, 2013, 12:29:35 PM »
I was born in 1980, and I remember the "buckle up for safety!" campaign.  I don't know what I used when I was a little baby, but we did have to use seatbelts when we were older.  However, we did have a minivan at one point, and my parents would sometimes let us lie down on the floor (when one seat was removed) and sleep during long car trips.  I remember that seatbelt trainers would tell you about some of the things people would say for why they wouldn't wear seatbelts, and one of them was, "It will wrinkle my clothes."  So I remember being stunned when my grandmother came for Easter once, and didn't want to use the seatbelt for exactly that reason.  "Nana, they used you as an example when they were teaching us about seatbelts!"  I think we guilted her into doing it.  :)

My kids are all in carseats/boosters, and it seems like each little one has been in a rear-facing seat for longer than the previous ones.  My 3-year-old was rear-facing until something like 2 or 2.5!

Hmmmmm

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1375 on: December 14, 2013, 12:31:34 PM »
I also feel compelled to mention that this is the woman who, when riding in my car with me to go to lunch, refused to put on her seatbelt.  We have a click-it-or-ticket law in my state so I simply put it in park and told her I wouldn't be driving anywhere until she buckled in.  Is seatbelt safety optional in her mind?  I thought this was something everybody learned when you outgrew your carseat/booster seats?
There are a lot of people of her generation who were taught by their parents that they were safer without seatbelts.  That without a seatbelt, you would be "thrown clear" in an accident and not be trapped in a burning car.  (Hollywood and TV have taught us, you see, that ALL cars catch on fire even in a fender-bender.  If you go off a cliff, your car might even burst into flames in mid-air!)

Yep, My mom was born in 1931 and hated seat bealts as she was always told that if in a wreck you'd end up trapped, especailly of a burning car and there was always stories, one in her family. The latches weren't as easy to release back then.

I was born in 1965 and the booster seat I used was the front seat center fold down arm rest while my 3 older sisters rode in the back.

Seat belts didn't become mandatory in my state for front seat passengers until '85. Adult backseat passengers weren't required to wear seatbelts until 2007 in my state.

Sirius

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1376 on: December 14, 2013, 03:33:23 PM »
One of my friends at work retired recently.  His name was Douglas, but he always went by his middle name, which was Larry.  When it came time for the Big Boss to make a speech about Larry, he constantly referred to him as "Douglas".  It wouldn't have mattered, except that this boss tried to pass himself off as a pal of the retiree (he's one of those bosses who likes to think that he's everybody's friend).

Hee hee! I shouldn't laugh at this, but it's somewhat karmic. I had a woman once make a similar kind of speech about me, and although she went on and on about all the good times we'd had together (I barely knew her), she pronounced my surname a different way each and every time she said it over the ten minutes. Even the people who knew neither of us were made aware that she was making stuff up.

When Mr. Sirius retired from the military, the person doing the hospital's online news website called me and asked me how to spell his name.  And they still got it wrong.  Say his name is Fred Thomas; the name that was on the website was Fred Tomkinson.  What amazed me was that in the picture of him his name tag obviously read "Thomas".   

Elfmama

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1377 on: December 14, 2013, 03:37:13 PM »
My girls had carseats before they came home from the hospital.  I don't remember if the state required them in the mid-70's, but *I* did!  My inlaws thought I was just being picky, and it was terrible that I strapped my babies in like that.  Their babies were always perfectly safe in someone's arms, their toddlers free range all over the car.  When they wanted to take them somewhere and tried to pull "my car, my rules, no carseat"  I put my foot down and said "MY kids.  No carseat, no rides in Grandma's car."  So they didn't go anywhere in Grandma's car, not until they were old enough to use regular seatbelts. 

And as for the kids being safe in the car, or that absolute nonsense about being "thrown clear" -- SonIL #1 was about 3 when his mother had an accident.  He had been standing on the front seat, facing the back, and went through the windshield. He almost died. Fractured skull, brain damage that lead to significant vision problems that still affect him, 40 years later; he's gradually lost color vision, to the point that now he can see as colors only certain shades of dark blue.  Everything else is like a black-and-white movie.  Bright colored patterns give him headaches, because his eyes can still see the colors, but his brain cannot interpret them.  He can't 'see' 3-D movies, because that requires the contrasting color vision.


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Katana_Geldar

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1378 on: December 14, 2013, 06:12:41 PM »
I was born in '84, grew up with seatbelts and car seats until I was about six. Now here they make you have them until 12, and I've seen car seats that will last kids that long!

Most folk remedies were created before people knew about "hormones". But I suppose there was a lot of pseudoscientific stuff since then that she might have picked up on.

Still, it's pretty bizarre, even for an "I read it in the Midnight Enquirer" sort of remedy. Why would you have hormones in your hair? How would removing them from there have any effect on the rest of your body?

There was an Agatha Christie book that I read once where criminals were trying to trick the gullible.  They did this by having two tactics.  The first was that they pretended to hold something like a seance that would use black magic to cause something.  But then there was also, slightly hidden, a machine full of whirling gizmos and weird things.  The idea was that if somebody was skeptical of the black magic stuff, he might go investigating.  And if he went investigating, he'd find the gizmo.  And then he might think that there was some scientific cause for the event, electromagnetic waves or something like that.  In reality, the cause was something completely normal and human, but they were hiding it by controlling what people thought in two different ways... one for people who would believe in black magic or witchcraft, the other for people who would believe in science.
I remember that novel, particularly since the whole thing was a hoohah anyway and their method go killing was completely pedestrian.

Jocelyn

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #1379 on: December 14, 2013, 07:06:13 PM »
MIL is about 65 and I assumed they had some form of baby safety devices in her youth, even if they've changed drastically over the years.  How else did you transport infants and toddlers around in the 1950s/60s?  ???  (I am sorry but I freely admit I am ignorant of vintage safety devices).
Nonexistant. I remember when my parents were ahead of the times and had seat belts installed in the back seat- they only came standard in the front seat in 1967.
When I was 3, my family went on a vacation trip. My parents thought they were quite clever (note, these are the same parents who installed seat belts a few years later), and they padded out the floorboards so one of my sister could sleep there, the other could sleep on the seat and for me, they built a stretcher that reached from the back deck to the front seat, with its legs resting on either side of the headrest. If Dad had ever had to hit the brakes hard, I would have shot forward right out the windshield, decapitating Mom on the way.
I can also remember how people ranted about infant seats- how cruel it was to strap a baby in! Babies were much safer riding on their mothers' laps, as maternal instinct would compell a woman to hold onto the baby tightly and safely in an accident. Plus, it made it SO much easier to feed the baby en route.