Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 310814 times)

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Seraphim

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2115 on: February 06, 2014, 01:02:05 AM »
Wings are still a cheap cut ($2.99 p/k as opposed to $9.99 p/k for breast) but they're rare to be served outside of finger foods.

You're in Australia right? Interesting to note differences in prices for food. I can usually get whole chicken breasts for 99 cents a pound on sale. Regular price is around 2.99. Boneless skinless regular price is maybe 3.99 and I can find them for 1.99 on sale.

I don't honestly know how much chicken wings go for these days as I never buy them. I just remember many years ago considering buying them to save money but deciding against it. Back then you could get a huge package of chicken wings for about the same price as one breast maybe. But then again, it gives you about the same amount of meat!  ;D

Yes - in Sydney.  Its a hideously expensive city to live in - I think the most recent survey placed us at 11th worldwide and we've been pretty consistently around that ranking.

Thigh is cheaper than breast but not by much.  Maybe $1 p/k less on average?

You should try Darwin! I think I pay about $8.99/kg for wings and up to $16.99 for breast/thighs.

http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/cost-of-living-in-australia-is-among-the-highest-in-the-world/story-fni0cx12-1226677641006

Sydney was 12, Darwin 11 and Perth 10th. Good thing this country is so beautiful I tell you!

The calculator in the article was actually really interesting.



Ereine

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2116 on: February 06, 2014, 01:18:19 AM »
Apparently the word cathedral isn't common knowledge here. We had to edit some ads we did for a client's series of concerts, called "Music in the Cathedral" because someone called them angry and complained about how the ads don't say where the concerts are (there's only one cathedral in our town). I was telling a friend about it and he didn't know what it meant either. To be fair, we do usually use another word for that type of church and he isn't Christian but neither am I (and he's lived close to the cathedral his whole life) and I don't find it particularly obscure.

menley

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2117 on: February 06, 2014, 05:23:20 AM »
Apparently the word cathedral isn't common knowledge here. We had to edit some ads we did for a client's series of concerts, called "Music in the Cathedral" because someone called them angry and complained about how the ads don't say where the concerts are (there's only one cathedral in our town). I was telling a friend about it and he didn't know what it meant either. To be fair, we do usually use another word for that type of church and he isn't Christian but neither am I (and he's lived close to the cathedral his whole life) and I don't find it particularly obscure.

Wow, really? Even my friends from the US (where we typically don't have "cathedrals", just churches) would all know what a cathedral was!

Teenyweeny

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2118 on: February 06, 2014, 05:45:58 AM »
I'm guessing it's a language thing? In the UK, cathedral is a reasonably common word. Every city has a cathedral. In fact, I think it might be (and definitely used to be) part of the definition of a UK city was that it had a cathedral and a university. That's why you can get UK cities that are smaller than large towns. For example, Reading (with a population of 150,000 ish) is a town, as it has a university but has never had a cathedral. Durham (with a population of about 85,000) is a city, as it has both.

Perhaps the word isn't as widely used in Finland?



Margo

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2119 on: February 06, 2014, 06:10:51 AM »
A University wasn't a requirement for City status in England,  just a cathedral.(or, more specifically, a Bishop).  Which is why Wells, in Somerset, is a city, despite being a small market town.

I *think* that a Royal Charter is required to create a city so the criteria doesn't apply any longer.

Teenyweeny

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2120 on: February 06, 2014, 06:13:03 AM »
A University wasn't a requirement for City status in England,  just a cathedral.(or, more specifically, a Bishop).  Which is why Wells, in Somerset, is a city, despite being a small market town.

I *think* that a Royal Charter is required to create a city so the criteria doesn't apply any longer.

Yeah, I knew the cathedral was a definite. As you say, it's all done by Royal charter now.



Ereine

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2121 on: February 06, 2014, 06:19:56 AM »
I thought that it was reasonably common but maybe it isn't, the more common word for Lutheran cathedrals (which most of the cathedrals here are) comes from the German Domkirche.

cabbageweevil

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2122 on: February 06, 2014, 07:56:35 AM »
I thought that it was reasonably common but maybe it isn't, the more common word for Lutheran cathedrals (which most of the cathedrals here are) comes from the German Domkirche.

I didn't realise that Lutherans had cathedrals -- ah, well, ignorance combatted !

This discussion makes a story from our family, hard to resist; though it's really about the "two nations divided by a common language" thing.  Way back before World War II, my mother and her brothers lived in an English cathedral city.  My uncles, as kids, were occasionally asked for directions by American tourists in the city.  Sometimes when this happened, they found the accent very strange (Americans were rarely encountered then, in provincial towns in Britain) -- like, "Say, sonny, can ya tell us the way to the CATH-uh-DRAHL?"  In these circumstances, my uncles were apt to play the prank of pretending not to understand what the tourist was saying: looking completely blank, and not giving the desired directions.

This was of course highly reprehensible, and very definitely bad behaviour !  My uncles used to tell us the tale, many decades later, with a mixture of shame and amusement.

Jocelyn

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2123 on: February 06, 2014, 08:31:24 AM »
A lot of Americans think a cathedral is a really old big church. :) There's some confusion about whether a particular Catholic church is a cathedral or not, because there may be a very elaborate old church that is not the seat of a bishop. And then there's situations like the archdiocese of Kansas City MO and St. Joseph, MO, which have co-cathedrals in each city. :)

gramma dishes

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2124 on: February 06, 2014, 10:09:06 AM »

...   "Say, sonny, can ya tell us the way to the CATH-uh-DRAHL?"  ...

I've lived in the U.S. my whole life and I've never heard an American pronounce cathedral that way!   ???

cabbageweevil

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2125 on: February 06, 2014, 10:21:50 AM »

...   "Say, sonny, can ya tell us the way to the CATH-uh-DRAHL?"  ...

I've lived in the U.S. my whole life and I've never heard an American pronounce cathedral that way!   ???

Well -- the uncle from whom I heard that tale the most, did have a quite vivid imagination...

Lynn2000

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2126 on: February 06, 2014, 10:29:50 AM »
I had to tell a fellow student that it was standard procedure for a professor to mark down points for misspelled words and terms. She was astonished at the concept.

I can sort of imagine that by university (which I associate with professors), the professors would be "beyond" marking and taking points off for misspellings/typos, in the sense that they're looking at the bigger picture of concepts, citations, etc.. But I think that is predicated on the fact that by university, the students should be beyond making such simple errors on an assignment they turn in. So if a professor took the time to mark the single typo in my ten-page essay, I would find that kind of odd, though honestly I would be more irritated at myself for leaving it in. However, if a paper was riddled with typos and mistakes, or had repeated misuse of an important term, that seems like cause for losing points.

I had a beginning-level archaeologist class, for example, where in my first paper I kept using the term "pot shards" when in fact, archaeologists say and spell it "pot sherds." Since it means "broken pieces of pottery," I was likening it to broken shards of glass, and the two words are so similar in sound and spelling--I thought it was a mix of me hearing it incorrectly, and maybe a British spelling, like color vs. colour, which I wasn't obligated to use. Yup, the professor marked every incorrect instance (and was right to do so), though I don't remember him taking off points for it. I got my paper back and thought, "Oh, this is a real thing after all."

Another time, as a graduate student when I really should have known better, I turned in a long term paper in which I had done the in-text citations wrong. If there are multiple authors on a paper--for example, Bob Smith, Sue Jones, and Amy Miller, in that order--in-text you often shorten the citation to "Smith et al." with the "et al." being an abbreviation for "et alii" which in Latin means "and others" (yes, I had to look that up just now). The point is, "et" is a complete word, but "al" is an abbreviation and needs a period after it. I had done all the citations as "et. al" getting it backwards. ::facepalm:: And the truth is, I wasn't 100% certain as I was writing it, I was just too lazy to double-check. And this professor dutifully marked every single instance. Again, I don't think he actually took off points, but it was rather humbling to see the red marks all over my entire paper.
~Lynn2000

ladyknight1

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2127 on: February 06, 2014, 10:37:55 AM »
This was a biology class. Pretty major differences between carbonyl and carboxyl, so that makes sense. The instructor had cautioned the class twice to know spelling when it comes to things like van der Waals interactions and the functional groups.

cabbageweevil

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2128 on: February 06, 2014, 10:41:24 AM »
A lot of Americans think a cathedral is a really old big church. :) There's some confusion about whether a particular Catholic church is a cathedral or not, because there may be a very elaborate old church that is not the seat of a bishop. And then there's situations like the archdiocese of Kansas City MO and St. Joseph, MO, which have co-cathedrals in each city. :)

As we're on the subject of cathedrals, and ecclesiastical administration and oddities thereof: quoting Margo from a few posts back, "requirement for City status in England [was] just a cathedral (or, more specifically, a Bishop). Which is why Wells, in Somerset, is a city, despite being a small market town."  It's a quirk of the Church of England's set-up, that the relevant bishop, is the Bishop of Bath and Wells.  Bath, not far away from Wells, is a much larger community than the latter, and is generally referred to as a city: but the cathedral is in Wells, and Bath has no cathedral.  Hence the rhyme:

The people of Wells
Have a cathedral all to theirsel's;
But of their bishop they have to give half
To "Barf".

Thipu1

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #2129 on: February 06, 2014, 11:04:08 AM »

...   "Say, sonny, can ya tell us the way to the CATH-uh-DRAHL?"  ...

I've lived in the U.S. my whole life and I've never heard an American pronounce cathedral that way!   ???

I've never heard Cathedral pronounced that way either and I've never met an American who didn't know what the word meant.  Of course, here in NYC we have several.  Old St. Patrick's (below Houston St.) wouldn't pass muster as a modern Cathedral but, in the early 19th century, it was pretty imposing.