Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 332145 times)

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Tea Drinker

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This was a teen, not an adult, but still:

My brother had some friends over.  My mom made veal parmesan.  One of the girls didn't know what that was:

Mom: Veal?  You know?

Girl: *blank stare*

Mom: Veal is baby cow.  You know, like lamb is baby sheep?

Girl: People eat sheep?

I was almost going to say in this thread that I wonder how anyone with two brain cells cannot understand where food comes, even without being told it. I never remember being told, it was so clear, we would eat chicken and pig and so on, and you know they are animals too. But then I started to wonder the English language, and how there is beef and pork and so on. I'm not a native speaker, but I've understood that these terms are usually used about meat, not really as "oh, there is the pork walking around, saying oink". So maybe it's not as clear if your mother says it's going to be pork today compared to if she would say it's going to be pig today.

On the other hand :D I do remember a friend who claimed to hate fish, yet ate canned tuna fish with good appetite because she did not realize it was fish... So maybe my theory is totally wrong :D

On different topic, I had to tell an adult female that getting her tubes tied would not stop her having periods.

In my area I'd not be that surprised someone didn't know what lamb was.  It's uncommon enough that someone might never have the opportunity to eat it.  Not every store sells lamb and those that do either have 5 lbs of ground lamb to 500 lb of beef or a ethnic/regional import/specialty shops.   

In the places I've lived, I can generally get lamb as chops, and sometimes leg of lamb, other parts sold for stew, or lamb steaks, but ground lamb is hard to find. For a while the supermarket near me had it quite cheap--I guessed that they were doing their own butchering, and decided that $1.50/pound for ground lamb was more profit than throwing it away. I tried it first because it was cheap, and we both liked it. Where I live now I have to go out of the way to get ground lamb, but lamb chops are still readily available.
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Venus193

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Ground lamb is easy to get in Greek neighborhoods because Greeks make excellent burgers out of it.  I wish I knew the spice blend they use for it because this is one of the few ways I eat lamb.

Browyn

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We had lamb for easter, I used this recipie, except I substituted garlic powder since that was what I had on hand:

http://www.food.com/recipe/roasted-leg-of-lamb-bone-in-301238

It was wonderful


cabbageweevil

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"Quixotic" is one of my favorite words in Scrabble.
Superb word for the game, with its q and x.  Another potentially wonderful one for the purpose, is the local (taken into English) word for the Mexican hairless dog -- Xoloitzcuintle. One day my brother -- with a lot of time on his hands -- figured out a situation in which that word could actually happen in a game of Scrabble -- getting a phenomenal score.

cabbageweevil

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

There's an item of English light verse which I recall (tried to Google it, but no luck), a stanza of which begins:

"Quixotic boys who look for joys,
 Quixotic hazards run..."

Margo

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?


Lamb - it's very common here  (Mutton is much harder to find - I think a lot of people don't like the stronger flavour) It's the meat I would be most suprised to find people didn't associate with the animal as it does have the same name - I mean, there's no reason to associate 'veal' with a calf, or 'venison' with a deer,  unless you have already learned that that is what it is, but if you are offered lamb, or rabbit, it seems you might have more of a clue to what you are being served. . .

(My grandmother used to tell a story about one of my aunts realising the connection between the rabbit they regularly ate, and Peter Rabbit. Rabbit was very cheap at the time, they were not well off, and she could not afford to stop serving it to the family. So for the next year or so they used regularly to have 'Lapin Pie' 'Lapin Stew' etc.. . )

cabbageweevil

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2014, 10:45:12 AM by cabbageweevil »

Perfect Circle

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I have to say that as a long term resident of the United Kingdom this is not an attitude I have ever run into.
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lowspark

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

It would make more sense (to me, at least) to say that the spelling ought to be changed than that the pronunciation should be. After all, in the Spanish, "x" is pronounced as an English "h". So if they said his name should be spelled "Keyhoatay" I could actually get on board with that.

After all, we do that with words in languages which use a different alphabet than ours - transliterate them into a recognizable spelling. So although the letters in Spanish and English look the same, the fact that they are sometimes pronounced differently calls more readily for a revision of the spelling than it does for a revision of the pronunciation.

menley

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I'm really confused. Did you really just say that you'd be wonderfully at home being a Nazi?

Luci

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I'm really confused. Did you really just say that you'd be wonderfully at home being a Nazi?

I think she's just being silly. Read the last sentence, and she certainly wouldn't have put a phrase in Latin in if she were serious.

lady_disdain

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I'm really confused. Did you really just say that you'd be wonderfully at home being a Nazi?

No, she said that a small number of people in England would be. "Us" refers to all the people living in the England, "a small number of us" means a subgroup. It does not, necessarily, include the speaker in that subgroup.

stargazer

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I'm really confused. Did you really just say that you'd be wonderfully at home being a Nazi?

I think she's just being silly. Read the last sentence, and she certainly wouldn't have put a phrase in Latin in if she were serious.

Putting two words in Latin does not make something incredibly offensive into a joke or "all in fun".

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(snip)
there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago

(/snip)


What in the world do you mean here? I can't come up with any interpretation of this that isn't horrible.
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