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  • October 24, 2017, 01:39:47 AM

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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1218698 times)

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lowspark

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

It would make more sense (to me, at least) to say that the spelling ought to be changed than that the pronunciation should be. After all, in the Spanish, "x" is pronounced as an English "h". So if they said his name should be spelled "Keyhoatay" I could actually get on board with that.

After all, we do that with words in languages which use a different alphabet than ours - transliterate them into a recognizable spelling. So although the letters in Spanish and English look the same, the fact that they are sometimes pronounced differently calls more readily for a revision of the spelling than it does for a revision of the pronunciation.
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menley

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I'm really confused. Did you really just say that you'd be wonderfully at home being a Nazi?

Luci

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I'm really confused. Did you really just say that you'd be wonderfully at home being a Nazi?

I think she's just being silly. Read the last sentence, and she certainly wouldn't have put a phrase in Latin in if she were serious.

lady_disdain

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I'm really confused. Did you really just say that you'd be wonderfully at home being a Nazi?

No, she said that a small number of people in England would be. "Us" refers to all the people living in the England, "a small number of us" means a subgroup. It does not, necessarily, include the speaker in that subgroup.

stargazer

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Thanks jpcher -- all is clear now !

Some Brits are serious, about an issue akin to the one re which your lady was jesting. They consider that people who pronounce the name of the tilting-at-windmills chap, in the correct Spanish way -- "Don Kee-hoat-ay" -- are off-puttingly parading what expert linguists and general culture-vultures they are. The British-isolationist view is that in Britain, the novel's hero should jolly well be mispronounced English-wise, as "Don Kwick-soat".  Afetr all, we've thought up an adjective, "quixotic" (English pronunciation) -- "acting like Don Q".

Well, I've learned something new. I was aware of the word "quixotic" and what it meant, but I've only seen it in writing and always assumed that it was pronounced kee-hoe-tic since it is derived from Don "kee-hoe-tay". (I don't think I've ever heard someone seriously pronounce Don Quixote as Don Kwick-soat, although granted, I don't have all that many conversations about Don Quixote.  ;)) But sure enough, I went to look at the dictionary entry for quixotic and the only pronunciation listed is kwick-sa-tic.

I'm with Onyx - I've never heard anyone seriously suggest that Don Quixote should be pronounced Kwick-soat, or that it is elitist to pronounce it correctly. I have heard it pronounced that way as a joke. I've come across people occasionally who didn't know how it was pronounced, but never anyone who argued for the incorrect version.  Cabbage Weevil, did you get into a conversation about Spanish literature with your local UKIP canvassers, or something?

No -- (pardon me if you're on this side of the pond, yourself -- sorry, yes, I seem to deduce that you are) -- it's just us English: there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago; but a fair number more, do feel (benignly and jokingly) that we're basically superior to all those foreign Johnnies, and feel proud of the fact that the English are poor linguists: those foreigners should speak God's own language (ours), not their ridiculous jargons -- which we modify ad lib to suit us, when the mood takes us. It's in fun -- we don't really hate and despise those who come from elsewhere in the world.

I'm really confused. Did you really just say that you'd be wonderfully at home being a Nazi?

I think she's just being silly. Read the last sentence, and she certainly wouldn't have put a phrase in Latin in if she were serious.

Putting two words in Latin does not make something incredibly offensive into a joke or "all in fun".

Betelnut

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Let's drop this topic or the thread will get locked!
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Ms_Cellany

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(snip)
there are a small number of us who (mutatis mutandis) would have been wonderfully at home in the National Socialist Party in Germany eighty years ago

(/snip)


What in the world do you mean here? I can't come up with any interpretation of this that isn't horrible.
Bingle bongle dingle dangle yickity-do yickity-dah ping-pong lippy-toppy too tah.

violinp

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Please, let's not discuss this further; the thread will probably get locked if we do.

I don't remember when I made the connection between the meat I ate and the animals they came from, but certainly I wasn't traumatized by it - I love most forms of meat. However, I did have to explain to a couple of my co - workers that, yes, people do eat baby cows, aka veal (I'd talked about osso bucco). They were just dumbfounded as to why someone would eat baby cows, and I said finally, "Well, because it tastes good. That's generally why people eat food, other than to not be hungry," because it was going in a circular argument that I was never going to to be able to break (But - but they're baby cows! Why would anyone eat baby cows? That's gross!).
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Carotte

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Please, let's not discuss this further; the thread will probably get locked if we do.

I don't remember when I made the connection between the meat I ate and the animals they came from, but certainly I wasn't traumatized by it - I love most forms of meat. However, I did have to explain to a couple of my co - workers that, yes, people do eat baby cows, aka veal (I'd talked about osso bucco). They were just dumbfounded as to why someone would eat baby cows, and I said finally, "Well, because it tastes good. That's generally why people eat food, other than to not be hungry," because it was going in a circular argument that I was never going to to be able to break (But - but they're baby cows! Why would anyone eat baby cows? That's gross!).

That's a weird argument, at least "that's wastefull, grown up cows have so much more meat on them  >:D" would make some* sense.
*some because waiting for them to be grown up means feeding them and looking after them longer.

stargazer

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I'm a little concerned that some people think something this offensive should just be glossed over in fear of a thread being locked instead of this being discussed as something that should not be said.  This reminds me of the "casual racism" thread where people don't say anything because they don't want to cause "trouble" (i.e. thread being locked).  Hopefully  cabbageweevil can come back to clarify or a mod can step in.

violinp

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Please, let's not discuss this further; the thread will probably get locked if we do.

I don't remember when I made the connection between the meat I ate and the animals they came from, but certainly I wasn't traumatized by it - I love most forms of meat. However, I did have to explain to a couple of my co - workers that, yes, people do eat baby cows, aka veal (I'd talked about osso bucco). They were just dumbfounded as to why someone would eat baby cows, and I said finally, "Well, because it tastes good. That's generally why people eat food, other than to not be hungry," because it was going in a circular argument that I was never going to to be able to break (But - but they're baby cows! Why would anyone eat baby cows? That's gross!).

That's a weird argument, at least "that's wastefull, grown up cows have so much more meat on them  >:D" would make some* sense.
*some because waiting for them to be grown up means feeding them and looking after them longer.

No, it's because apparently killing sweet little innocent babies is gross and only monsters would do it. Evil!Violinp wanted to channel her late grandpa, and say, "Innocent of what?  >:D" but fortunately, I can shove Evil!Violinp back in her cage with promises of fudge bars.
"It takes a great deal of courage to stand up to your enemies, but even more to stand up to your friends" - Harry Potter


Ms_Cellany

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I'm a little concerned that some people think something this offensive should just be glossed over in fear of a thread being locked instead of this being discussed as something that should not be said.  This reminds me of the "casual racism" thread where people don't say anything because they don't want to cause "trouble" (i.e. thread being locked).  Hopefully  cabbageweevil can come back to clarify or a mod can step in.

I agree. I would rather see a casual Nazi joke be called out for the heinous thing that it is than be afraid of having an Internet discussion thread locked.
Bingle bongle dingle dangle yickity-do yickity-dah ping-pong lippy-toppy too tah.

Onyx_TKD

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I'm a little concerned that some people think something this offensive should just be glossed over in fear of a thread being locked instead of this being discussed as something that should not be said.  This reminds me of the "casual racism" thread where people don't say anything because they don't want to cause "trouble" (i.e. thread being locked).  Hopefully  cabbageweevil can come back to clarify or a mod can step in.

I agree. I would rather see a casual Nazi joke be called out for the heinous thing that it is than be afraid of having an Internet discussion thread locked.

Then perhaps the appropriate thing to do is report it to the mods. The comment wasn't allowed to go unchallenged. People have already said they found it offensive. If one person makes a offensive post, there are a few in-thread objections, and people report it to the mods, then the mods frequently take action only to deal with the offending poster (e.g., by warning them, gagging them, deleting the offending post, etc.) and the thread may continue on its intended topic. If the thread degenerates into a discussion of the nasty post, then (1) we're going to lose a fun and interesting thread in a dogpile over Nazi jokes and (2) the thread is most likely going to get locked. I, for one, would prefer the former option, where only the offending post gets smacked down, rather than losing the entire thread. The comment has already been publicly called out, and this board has an effective system for dealing with inappropriate posts without letting them derail entire threads. Please, let's let that system do it's job.

stargazer

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Three people (as far as I can tell) being in disgust of his post do not constitute a dog pile (and even if it did, being at home as a Nazi "jokes" are certainly something that deserve it) and I guarantee you this has been reported to the mods long ago.

Visiting Crazy Town

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I'm a little concerned that some people think something this offensive should just be glossed over in fear of a thread being locked instead of this being discussed as something that should not be said.  This reminds me of the "casual racism" thread where people don't say anything because they don't want to cause "trouble" (i.e. thread being locked).  Hopefully  cabbageweevil can come back to clarify or a mod can step in.

I agree. I would rather see a casual Nazi joke be called out for the heinous thing that it is than be afraid of having an Internet discussion thread locked.

Then perhaps the appropriate thing to do is report it to the mods. The comment wasn't allowed to go unchallenged. People have already said they found it offensive. If one person makes a offensive post, there are a few in-thread objections, and people report it to the mods, then the mods frequently take action only to deal with the offending poster (e.g., by warning them, gagging them, deleting the offending post, etc.) and the thread may continue on its intended topic. If the thread degenerates into a discussion of the nasty post, then (1) we're going to lose a fun and interesting thread in a dogpile over Nazi jokes and (2) the thread is most likely going to get locked. I, for one, would prefer the former option, where only the offending post gets smacked down, rather than losing the entire thread. The comment has already been publicly called out, and this board has an effective system for dealing with inappropriate posts without letting them derail entire threads. Please, let's let that system do it's job.

Or perhaps its best to do both publically call out a disgust/racist comment and report the post