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  • October 17, 2017, 12:34:14 PM

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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1206555 times)

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cass2591

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I'm not going to lock the thread on account of one poster's incredible lack of judgment. Cabbageweevil, whether you were "joking" or not, (and frankly I'm not sure which I'd prefer on a personal level but that's irrelevant) but your post was unbelievably inappropriate. Some things should remain unsaid, or unposted anyway. If you were just kidding, hardee har, then it's a know your audience thing and there is absolutely no way this audience will react to your Nazi reference without taking offense and I am one of them.

All other posters, please move on. Those who said the issue should be addressed rather than locked are correct.  IMO some things are just too awful, no matter what the poster's intent was, to ignore.
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perpetua

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This is a most bizarre turn of events but given that cabbageweevil is, I believe, an older gent, who often posts in quite flowery language (that sometimes I have trouble deciphering even from the same side of the pond), I'd like to see him given the opportunity to explain himself before he's hung, drawn and quartered. I don't think, personally, he was referring to himself. I think what he was trying to say, very clumsily, is that while a certain contingent of the UK *do* genuinely feel superior to foreigners (this is a very, very big thing in the media here at the moment and the reference may have been lost on those not familiar with certain things happening over here at the moment) hence the unfortunate reference, but most of us don't and we have a bit of a laugh over the pronunciation differences.

ETA: Cass, apologies, our posts crossed.

Tea Drinker

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With regard to pronunciation of "Don Quixote," Spanish spelling and pronunciation have also changed over the centuries; if the book had been written in Spain in the 19th century, he would have been spelled "Don Quijote." I mostly see that usage of x for /h/ in Mexican spellings of words borrowed from native languages: for example, Oaxaca is pronounced something like "wah-hah-kah."

But I wouldn't expect a non-Hispanophone adult to know how to pronounce Oaxaca, nor yet that people in England used to pronounce "Don Juan" as two syllables, with the j as in "jealous." Those are facts, and potentially useful or interesting ones, but they don't fall into "an adult should really know this."
Any advice that requires the use of a time machine may safely be ignored.

amandaelizabeth

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It wasn't until I heard Victor Borge do his 'inflationary numbers' act that I realised that Don Juan was not pronounced Don June.

Hillia

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It wasn't until I heard Victor Borge do his 'inflationary numbers' act that I realised that Don Juan was not pronounced Don June.

But when you're reading the poem by Byron, you have to pronounce it Joo-wan:
I want a hero: an uncommon want,
       When every year and month sends forth a new one,
     Till, after cloying the gazettes with cant,
       The age discovers he is not the true one;
     Of such as these I should not care to vaunt,
       I 'll therefore take our ancient friend Don Juan
     We all have seen him, in the pantomime,
     Sent to the devil somewhat ere his time.


Regarding pronunciation, BIL considers himself quite the Spanish linguist.  It still tickles me to remember him ordering 'steak Tampikwena' (Tampiquena, pronounced tampikenya).  I'm not an expert in Spanish, but I believe the qu is almost always pronouced as a k - queso, que, tequila, etc.  Add in a very heavy twang and it was pretty funny.  Of course, MIL says 'kweso' for 'queso', so it's a family thing.  Funniest part is, they live in an area with a large Hispanic population, so Spanish words and phrases are common vocabulary.

poundcake

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I just got witnessed to by two Christian men at the local Starbucks. One recited several bible verses and pointed out that the bible was "the oldest book in the world. We're still talking about it today." I told him that Homer's Iliad was at least eight centuries older than the bible, and we're still talking about it today. He didn't believe me. He didn't believe that there was ANY book older than the bible. I suggested he Google-search the Epic of Gilgamesh and flood mythology. I wonder if he'll actually do it, and discover that the "Noah" story actually pre-dates Noah by roughly 1500 years.

cabbageweevil

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cass2591 #2798, perpetua #2799, and all others -- I've been away from the Internet for most of two days, and have only just now logged on once more.  perpetua, you have it rightly about what I was trying to say.  Be things as they may: I've been brought to realise that I made a most crassly insensitive, offensive, and inappropriate reference. I'll just say that I am very sorry indeed; and that to express my contrition, I intend to voluntary suspend myself from participation on the board, until the beginning of next month.

Katana_Geldar

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I just got witnessed to by two Christian men at the local Starbucks. One recited several bible verses and pointed out that the bible was "the oldest book in the world. We're still talking about it today." I told him that Homer's Iliad was at least eight centuries older than the bible, and we're still talking about it today. He didn't believe me. He didn't believe that there was ANY book older than the bible. I suggested he Google-search the Epic of Gilgamesh and flood mythology. I wonder if he'll actually do it, and discover that the "Noah" story actually pre-dates Noah by roughly 1500 years.
I've known people like that that will willfully try to keep themselves ignorant.

Jocelyn

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I just got witnessed to by two Christian men at the local Starbucks. One recited several bible verses and pointed out that the bible was "the oldest book in the world. We're still talking about it today." I told him that Homer's Iliad was at least eight centuries older than the bible, and we're still talking about it today. He didn't believe me. He didn't believe that there was ANY book older than the bible. I suggested he Google-search the Epic of Gilgamesh and flood mythology. I wonder if he'll actually do it, and discover that the "Noah" story actually pre-dates Noah by roughly 1500 years.
I've known people like that that will willfully try to keep themselves ignorant.
OTOH, if you look at it from his perspective, he probably learned his information from his church. Now this random stranger is telling him information that contradicts his most 'reliable source'. Why should he immediately agree? I know that if someone told me that something I believed to be true was false, my first reaction wouldn't be to agree. We don't know if he took the OP's suggestion later...

Mister E

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I once had to explain to a man I'm "friends" with (I use that word loosely in this context as I don't like him as much as he likes me but that's a whole other issue...) that a medication isn't a "water pill" just because you take it with water, it's a water pill because it flushes water out of your system. ::) I'm absolutely floored at how many things this guy doesn't seem to know about or understand. This is one of my favorite incidents with him because I thought everybody knew that. Obviously not.

Ed.

Psychopoesie

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I once had to explain to a man I'm "friends" with (I use that word loosely in this context as I don't like him as much as he likes me but that's a whole other issue...) that a medication isn't a "water pill" just because you take it with water, it's a water pill because it flushes water out of your system. ::) I'm absolutely floored at how many things this guy doesn't seem to know about or understand. This is one of my favorite incidents with him because I thought everybody knew that. Obviously not.

Ed.

I've never even heard of a "water pill" so he's already one up on me. I have heard of diuretic pills - assume it's the same thing?

Onyx_TKD

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I once had to explain to a man I'm "friends" with (I use that word loosely in this context as I don't like him as much as he likes me but that's a whole other issue...) that a medication isn't a "water pill" just because you take it with water, it's a water pill because it flushes water out of your system. ::) I'm absolutely floored at how many things this guy doesn't seem to know about or understand. This is one of my favorite incidents with him because I thought everybody knew that. Obviously not.

Ed.

I'm an adult, and this is the first time I've ever heard of a "water pill." But then again, I've never needed medication to flush water out of my system, either, so it's not really relevant to me. I expect adults to learn about the medications that they themselves take or that people under their care take, but otherwise I don't see why it would be common knowledge.

Incidentally, if I'd had to guess based on the name, I would have assumed it was either a pill that contained/appeared to contain water (something along the lines of a gel cap) or one designed to increase the amount of water in the body. Calling a diuretic a "water pill" seems quite illogical to me. ???

Mister E

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Yes "diuretic pill" would be the same thing as a water pill. It's been my experience that they're usually (but not always) used to help lower high blood pressure, and there are several varieties of them. I've usually heard them called water pills where I live, I guess it's not as common as I thought, although I know I've seen the term in medical articles or magazines too. So it's a bit strange to me that it's not apparently common knowledge like I thought. Oh well.

Ed.

greencat

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I've heard it before, but only when discussing medication with people of my grandfather's generation.  It's a very old-fashioned term for a diuretic!

Mister E

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I'd hardly call it "old fashioned" since I heard it all the time when I was growing up and I'm only 45.

Ed.