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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1261364 times)

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Mister E

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Maybe the term is just more common in certain areas than others yet.

Ed.  ETA: The man I explained it to is about 15 years older than me so I think that makes it even weirder that he wasn't familiar with the term and I am. But then he's totally clueless about more subjects than I care to think about.  ::)
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 01:59:06 AM by Mister E »

greencat

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Maybe the term is just more common in certain areas than others yet.

Ed.  ETA: The man I explained it to is about 15 years older than me so I think that makes it even weirder that he wasn't familiar with the term and I am. But then he's totally clueless about more subjects than I care to think about.  ::)

I have learned that some people, although objectively intelligent, suffer from the Dunning-Kruger effect for everything.

ladyknight1

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I've heard it before, but only when discussing medication with people of my grandfather's generation.  It's a very old-fashioned term for a diuretic!

POD. Same in my experience. My great grandmother and her sisters always called diuretics "water pills".
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

lowspark

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I think it's just more of a case of forgetting that something that is second nature to you isn't necessarily second nature to everyone else. For example, people tend to use jargon from their area of expertise in every day language. As particular words come into common usage for themselves, they just forget that they are not in common usage for most other people. I think it's human nature to forget that things that are ingrained in your own knowledge, aren't necessarily ingrained in others'.
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Outdoor Girl

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In my work, we use a lot of acronyms.  We jokingly call ourselves 'The Ministry of TLAs' (three letter acronyms).

A couple of us were at a ball tournament on the weekend with another person who doesn't work where we do.  We confused the heck out of him, throwing arround the acronyms that are second nature to us.
After cleaning out my Dad's house, I have this advice:  If you haven't used it in a year, throw it out!!!!.
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Shalamar

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Quote
they just forget that they are not in common usage for most other people.

When my first daughter was a newborn and was a bit fussy, a friend of a friend asked me if I had a "soo" that I could use.  I looked at her blankly, and she had to explain that "soo" was her word for "soother", or "pacifier". 

hermanne

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Quote
they just forget that they are not in common usage for most other people.

When my first daughter was a newborn and was a bit fussy, a friend of a friend asked me if I had a "soo" that I could use.  I looked at her blankly, and she had to explain that "soo" was her word for "soother", or "pacifier".

We called our kids' teething rings "chew ons" as in "something to chew on".
Bad spellers of the world, UNTIE!




greencat

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I had a few instances of confusion at a friend's house when they asked for the "clicker" - it was what they called a remote! 

Lynn2000

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Quote
they just forget that they are not in common usage for most other people.

When my first daughter was a newborn and was a bit fussy, a friend of a friend asked me if I had a "soo" that I could use.  I looked at her blankly, and she had to explain that "soo" was her word for "soother", or "pacifier".

Not to derail with a discussion about different pacifier names :D but my cousin calls it a "toota." That's how it sounds, anyway. I think it might be usage from her DH's family. It took me a while to figure out what they were referring to when they asked for the baby's toota.
~Lynn2000

jaxsue

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I had a few instances of confusion at a friend's house when they asked for the "clicker" - it was what they called a remote!

We call a remote a "clicker."  :)

jedikaiti

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I had a few instances of confusion at a friend's house when they asked for the "clicker" - it was what they called a remote!

We call a remote a "clicker."  :)

I don't say that, but I have heard it. In context, it could be confusing for me, as I have several friends who have clicker trained their dogs. <G>
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

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kherbert05

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I've heard it before, but only when discussing medication with people of my grandfather's generation.  It's a very old-fashioned term for a diuretic!


An euphemism I've heard from some older relatives for what happens when you take this medication is "making water" so that may have been where the term water pill came from. 
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Luci

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I had a few instances of confusion at a friend's house when they asked for the "clicker" - it was what they called a remote!

There was an Adam Sandler movie called "Click", which meant the remote.

Lucas calls it a 'firestick', which still confuses me after about 40 years of owning TV remotes. I'm slow.


oz diva

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We call it the boredom control.

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Ms_Cellany

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With regard to pronunciation of "Don Quixote," Spanish spelling and pronunciation have also changed over the centuries; if the book had been written in Spain in the 19th century, he would have been spelled "Don Quijote." I mostly see that usage of x for /h/ in Mexican spellings of words borrowed from native languages: for example, Oaxaca is pronounced something like "wah-hah-kah."

There's a joke about a Texas town, Mexia:

Some tourists driving through decided to stop for a bite. They asked the waitress, "How do you pronounce the name of this place?"
She said, "Day-a-ree Ka-ween."


(The town is "meh-HEE-ah."  Their motto: "A great place to live, no matter how you pronounce it")
Bingle bongle dingle dangle yickity-do yickity-dah ping-pong lippy-toppy too tah.