Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 303820 times)

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Katana_Geldar

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I just got witnessed to by two Christian men at the local Starbucks. One recited several bible verses and pointed out that the bible was "the oldest book in the world. We're still talking about it today." I told him that Homer's Iliad was at least eight centuries older than the bible, and we're still talking about it today. He didn't believe me. He didn't believe that there was ANY book older than the bible. I suggested he Google-search the Epic of Gilgamesh and flood mythology. I wonder if he'll actually do it, and discover that the "Noah" story actually pre-dates Noah by roughly 1500 years.
I've known people like that that will willfully try to keep themselves ignorant.

Jocelyn

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I just got witnessed to by two Christian men at the local Starbucks. One recited several bible verses and pointed out that the bible was "the oldest book in the world. We're still talking about it today." I told him that Homer's Iliad was at least eight centuries older than the bible, and we're still talking about it today. He didn't believe me. He didn't believe that there was ANY book older than the bible. I suggested he Google-search the Epic of Gilgamesh and flood mythology. I wonder if he'll actually do it, and discover that the "Noah" story actually pre-dates Noah by roughly 1500 years.
I've known people like that that will willfully try to keep themselves ignorant.
OTOH, if you look at it from his perspective, he probably learned his information from his church. Now this random stranger is telling him information that contradicts his most 'reliable source'. Why should he immediately agree? I know that if someone told me that something I believed to be true was false, my first reaction wouldn't be to agree. We don't know if he took the OP's suggestion later...

Mister E

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I once had to explain to a man I'm "friends" with (I use that word loosely in this context as I don't like him as much as he likes me but that's a whole other issue...) that a medication isn't a "water pill" just because you take it with water, it's a water pill because it flushes water out of your system. ::) I'm absolutely floored at how many things this guy doesn't seem to know about or understand. This is one of my favorite incidents with him because I thought everybody knew that. Obviously not.

Ed.

Psychopoesie

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I once had to explain to a man I'm "friends" with (I use that word loosely in this context as I don't like him as much as he likes me but that's a whole other issue...) that a medication isn't a "water pill" just because you take it with water, it's a water pill because it flushes water out of your system. ::) I'm absolutely floored at how many things this guy doesn't seem to know about or understand. This is one of my favorite incidents with him because I thought everybody knew that. Obviously not.

Ed.

I've never even heard of a "water pill" so he's already one up on me. I have heard of diuretic pills - assume it's the same thing?

Onyx_TKD

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I once had to explain to a man I'm "friends" with (I use that word loosely in this context as I don't like him as much as he likes me but that's a whole other issue...) that a medication isn't a "water pill" just because you take it with water, it's a water pill because it flushes water out of your system. ::) I'm absolutely floored at how many things this guy doesn't seem to know about or understand. This is one of my favorite incidents with him because I thought everybody knew that. Obviously not.

Ed.

I'm an adult, and this is the first time I've ever heard of a "water pill." But then again, I've never needed medication to flush water out of my system, either, so it's not really relevant to me. I expect adults to learn about the medications that they themselves take or that people under their care take, but otherwise I don't see why it would be common knowledge.

Incidentally, if I'd had to guess based on the name, I would have assumed it was either a pill that contained/appeared to contain water (something along the lines of a gel cap) or one designed to increase the amount of water in the body. Calling a diuretic a "water pill" seems quite illogical to me. ???

Mister E

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Yes "diuretic pill" would be the same thing as a water pill. It's been my experience that they're usually (but not always) used to help lower high blood pressure, and there are several varieties of them. I've usually heard them called water pills where I live, I guess it's not as common as I thought, although I know I've seen the term in medical articles or magazines too. So it's a bit strange to me that it's not apparently common knowledge like I thought. Oh well.

Ed.

greencat

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I've heard it before, but only when discussing medication with people of my grandfather's generation.  It's a very old-fashioned term for a diuretic!

Mister E

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I'd hardly call it "old fashioned" since I heard it all the time when I was growing up and I'm only 45.

Ed.

Mister E

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Maybe the term is just more common in certain areas than others yet.

Ed.  ETA: The man I explained it to is about 15 years older than me so I think that makes it even weirder that he wasn't familiar with the term and I am. But then he's totally clueless about more subjects than I care to think about.  ::)
« Last Edit: June 18, 2014, 02:59:06 AM by Mister E »

greencat

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Maybe the term is just more common in certain areas than others yet.

Ed.  ETA: The man I explained it to is about 15 years older than me so I think that makes it even weirder that he wasn't familiar with the term and I am. But then he's totally clueless about more subjects than I care to think about.  ::)

I have learned that some people, although objectively intelligent, suffer from the Dunning-Kruger effect for everything.

ladyknight1

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I've heard it before, but only when discussing medication with people of my grandfather's generation.  It's a very old-fashioned term for a diuretic!

POD. Same in my experience. My great grandmother and her sisters always called diuretics "water pills".

lowspark

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I think it's just more of a case of forgetting that something that is second nature to you isn't necessarily second nature to everyone else. For example, people tend to use jargon from their area of expertise in every day language. As particular words come into common usage for themselves, they just forget that they are not in common usage for most other people. I think it's human nature to forget that things that are ingrained in your own knowledge, aren't necessarily ingrained in others'.

Outdoor Girl

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In my work, we use a lot of acronyms.  We jokingly call ourselves 'The Ministry of TLAs' (three letter acronyms).

A couple of us were at a ball tournament on the weekend with another person who doesn't work where we do.  We confused the heck out of him, throwing arround the acronyms that are second nature to us.
I have CDO.  It is like OCD but with the letters in alphabetical order, as they should be.
Ontario

Shalamar

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Quote
they just forget that they are not in common usage for most other people.

When my first daughter was a newborn and was a bit fussy, a friend of a friend asked me if I had a "soo" that I could use.  I looked at her blankly, and she had to explain that "soo" was her word for "soother", or "pacifier". 

hermanne

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they just forget that they are not in common usage for most other people.

When my first daughter was a newborn and was a bit fussy, a friend of a friend asked me if I had a "soo" that I could use.  I looked at her blankly, and she had to explain that "soo" was her word for "soother", or "pacifier".

We called our kids' teething rings "chew ons" as in "something to chew on".
Bad spellers of the world, UNTIE!