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  • September 26, 2017, 02:44:18 AM

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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1174989 times)

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ladyknight1

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^ :)

I'm from Texas.

I had to tell someone that although their new employee seemed great, nothing had been posted on their social media accounts in two weeks, so they might want to look into that.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

nutraxfornerves

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I had to tell someone that although their new employee seemed great, nothing had been posted on their social media accounts in two weeks, so they might want to look into that.

Why was that a problem? Is posting to social media part of the person's job duties?

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

ladyknight1

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Yes. They were hired to replace the previous "designate". That's a big deal in my organization.
ďAll that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

nutraxfornerves

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At the county public library today. Got to listen to a librarian patiently trying to explain to a young woman that the county library was not the library for the local college, that it was in no way connected to the local college, so, no, the books your professor put on reserve for his class will not be found here.

Nutrax
The plural of anecdote is not data

Southern_Continent

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In a college biology class when talking about inherited traits, there was a girl who was absolutely adamant that if you cut off a mouse's tail, any babies the mouse had would also not have tails. The teacher and everyone in the class tried to explain it to her, but she was absolutely positive. One guy even told her that his dad was a vet who lost his lower leg in combat before he was born, and yet he had two full legs. That finally seems to sort of sink in, but she still wasn't sure...

I also knew a couple in their 30's who were trying to have a baby. Both very intellectual, in professional fields. The wife shared with some of us that they were playing scrabble once a month just like the books tell you to do to conceive but it just wasn't working and they were starting to think they were infertile - they tried every month on the 15th. One lady tried to explain about her cycle and that it was the middle of her CYCLE (sort of) not the middle of the month, but she very politely disagreed because her book said otherwise. Said lady then tried to suggest trying more often maybe, and she said that wouldn't help and could actually reduce the count of things (not sure what words get blocked) if they played scrabble more than once a month.

Katana_Geldar

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It doesn't necessarily work like that, more like every few days to "build up". Once a month though is rather sad IMHO.

I also think it's rather sad how many adults grow up ignorant of "the facts of life". Sometimes with unintended consequences.

MommyPenguin

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They used to say every other day was ideal, but I ran into an article recently that said that the "build up" idea, while valid, turns out to actually be less important than simply having more opportunities, so now they're saying to go ahead and try every day.  I wonder how many guys could keep up that kind of schedule.  :)
Emily is 10 years old!  1/07
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Baby Charlie expected 9/17

Harriet Jones

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With regard to pronunciation of "Don Quixote," Spanish spelling and pronunciation have also changed over the centuries; if the book had been written in Spain in the 19th century, he would have been spelled "Don Quijote." I mostly see that usage of x for /h/ in Mexican spellings of words borrowed from native languages: for example, Oaxaca is pronounced something like "wah-hah-kah."

There's a joke about a Texas town, Mexia:

Some tourists driving through decided to stop for a bite. They asked the waitress, "How do you pronounce the name of this place?"
She said, "Day-a-ree Ka-ween."


(The town is "meh-HEE-ah."  Their motto: "A great place to live, no matter how you pronounce it")

I've heard the same joke about Natchitoches, Louisiana

Katana_Geldar

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They used to say every other day was ideal, but I ran into an article recently that said that the "build up" idea, while valid, turns out to actually be less important than simply having more opportunities, so now they're saying to go ahead and try every day.  I wonder how many guys could keep up that kind of schedule.  :)
It is kind of fun when your doctor tells you to "go at it". ;)

kherbert05

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In a college biology class when talking about inherited traits, there was a girl who was absolutely adamant that if you cut off a mouse's tail, any babies the mouse had would also not have tails. The teacher and everyone in the class tried to explain it to her, but she was absolutely positive. One guy even told her that his dad was a vet who lost his lower leg in combat before he was born, and yet he had two full legs. That finally seems to sort of sink in, but she still wasn't sure...

If she still has doubts we can introduce her to Aunts #4 & 5 and Uncles # 3, 4, 5. My Grandfather lost his right arm and eye in WWII all 5 of his youngest kids have 2 arms and 2 eyes. (So did the oldest 5 born before his injury.)
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Psychopoesie

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In a college biology class when talking about inherited traits, there was a girl who was absolutely adamant that if you cut off a mouse's tail, any babies the mouse had would also not have tails. The teacher and everyone in the class tried to explain it to her, but she was absolutely positive. One guy even told her that his dad was a vet who lost his lower leg in combat before he was born, and yet he had two full legs. That finally seems to sort of sink in, but she still wasn't sure...

If she still has doubts we can introduce her to Aunts #4 & 5 and Uncles # 3, 4, 5. My Grandfather lost his right arm and eye in WWII all 5 of his youngest kids have 2 arms and 2 eyes. (So did the oldest 5 born before his injury.)

Reminds me a bit of an earlier theory of evolution from a guy called Lamarck who thought skills acquired were passed on to offspring. So giraffes eventually ended up with long necks because shorter necked giraffes kept stretching to reach food.

http://necsi.edu/projects/evolution/lamarck/lamarck/lamarck_lamarck.html

Elfmama

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In a college biology class when talking about inherited traits, there was a girl who was absolutely adamant that if you cut off a mouse's tail, any babies the mouse had would also not have tails. The teacher and everyone in the class tried to explain it to her, but she was absolutely positive. One guy even told her that his dad was a vet who lost his lower leg in combat before he was born, and yet he had two full legs. That finally seems to sort of sink in, but she still wasn't sure...

If she still has doubts we can introduce her to Aunts #4 & 5 and Uncles # 3, 4, 5. My Grandfather lost his right arm and eye in WWII all 5 of his youngest kids have 2 arms and 2 eyes. (So did the oldest 5 born before his injury.)
However, there are outside influences that can affect how a cell can function, but not change the DNA itself.  Here's a good understandable article, or google epigenetics.   If I'm understanding it correctly, such influences can be inherited along with the relevant DNA. 

For instance, my father was severely malnourished as a child.  At 21, he was only 5 feet tall; after joining the Army Air Corps, he finally got enough to eat and started to grow, but topped out at 5'4".  His parents were both significantly taller.  I'm 5'2"; my brother is 5'10".  It may be that I should have been several inches taller, but the genes for my height were influenced by epigenetic changes caused by the malnutrition. 
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~
Common sense is not a gift, but a curse.  Because then
you have to deal with all the people who don't have it.
~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~

MommyPenguin

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In a college biology class when talking about inherited traits, there was a girl who was absolutely adamant that if you cut off a mouse's tail, any babies the mouse had would also not have tails. The teacher and everyone in the class tried to explain it to her, but she was absolutely positive. One guy even told her that his dad was a vet who lost his lower leg in combat before he was born, and yet he had two full legs. That finally seems to sort of sink in, but she still wasn't sure...

If she still has doubts we can introduce her to Aunts #4 & 5 and Uncles # 3, 4, 5. My Grandfather lost his right arm and eye in WWII all 5 of his youngest kids have 2 arms and 2 eyes. (So did the oldest 5 born before his injury.)
However, there are outside influences that can affect how a cell can function, but not change the DNA itself.  Here's a good understandable article, or google epigenetics.   If I'm understanding it correctly, such influences can be inherited along with the relevant DNA. 

For instance, my father was severely malnourished as a child.  At 21, he was only 5 feet tall; after joining the Army Air Corps, he finally got enough to eat and started to grow, but topped out at 5'4".  His parents were both significantly taller.  I'm 5'2"; my brother is 5'10".  It may be that I should have been several inches taller, but the genes for my height were influenced by epigenetic changes caused by the malnutrition.

I find it fascinating that they did a study of adults who would have been still gestating inside their mothers during the starving time in Holland.  They found that those people were significantly more likely to be overweight as adults.  So something about being inside a starving mother's body triggered a "save all food" thing in the baby, so that the baby was born with a greater tendency to hold on to weight.  Or something along those lines.  Obviously not a change to their genes so much as a trigger to their, I don't know, brain/thyroid/something, but interesting nonetheless.
Emily is 10 years old!  1/07
Jenny is 8 years old!  10/08
Charlotte is 7 years old!  8/10
Megan is 4 years old!  10/12
Lydia is 2 years old!  12/14
Baby Charlie expected 9/17

Fliss

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Quote

Reminds me a bit of an earlier theory of evolution from a guy called Lamarck who thought skills acquired were passed on to offspring. So giraffes eventually ended up with long necks because shorter necked giraffes kept stretching to reach food.


And yet there's that niggling little thing commonly known as "racial memory". I'm assuming every here is intelligent enough for me not to have to explain what context I'm using racial in.

This memory shouldn't exist, but it does, and in every species we can test for it, apparently. It baffles scientists. Cells can "remember" things, and they seem to be able to pass that information on. We don't really know why or how, and it's only just starting to be understood what.

Isn't science fun, kiddies!
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jedikaiti

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Quote

Reminds me a bit of an earlier theory of evolution from a guy called Lamarck who thought skills acquired were passed on to offspring. So giraffes eventually ended up with long necks because shorter necked giraffes kept stretching to reach food.


And yet there's that niggling little thing commonly known as "racial memory". I'm assuming every here is intelligent enough for me not to have to explain what context I'm using racial in.

This memory shouldn't exist, but it does, and in every species we can test for it, apparently. It baffles scientists. Cells can "remember" things, and they seem to be able to pass that information on. We don't really know why or how, and it's only just starting to be understood what.

Isn't science fun, kiddies!

It is! And this makes me think of the Black Hole Information Paradox, which is definitely NOT something every adult should know. WhenI decided to do a paper on it for an undergrad astrophysics class, my prof said something like "Good. You can explain it to me."
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture