Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 332390 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

MommyPenguin

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4633
    • My blog!

The "winner takes all" (or the few who make it to the top levels take all) aspect of competitive sports is one of the reasons why I dislike it. I can't watch it without thinking of all the young people who get told that you will make if you give it your all, gave it their all and just weren't the 0.5% who are able to make it pro. Some sports aren't as bad but others require 100% dedication from a very young age (gymnastics, for example) in a way that I think is harmful to them, whether or not they ever make it to national level. School is often neglected or there is little time for friendship, leisure or finding themselves as people, not just gymnasts. It requires that 12 year olds train while barely recovered from injuries.
My sister's best friend had a son who did gymnastics. When he was about 12, he decided that he didn't want to compete any more. For the next year, he slept about half the time, and then shot up nearly a foot. His doctor said that gymnasts aren't gymnasts because they're small, they're small because they're gymnasts. Fortunately for this boy, he quit early enough that his body could recover and reach its full genetic potential. You have to wonder how many of those little Olympians who start in childhood and compete hard during their teens, would have been tall adults if they'd chosen a different sport.

That's really interesting.  I wonder what it is about the training that keeps people small?

My brother and I were both on the small side when we were young children.  Always the front row in class pictures, that sort of thing.  Not usually the smallest person in class, but near it.  When he was in 9th grade, he joined the golf team and was the shortest boy on it.  He didn't have the arm length or power for good drives, but he was very, very talented at the short game (putting and other shorter shots, basically).  He had the precision down pat.  He took his 10th grade year off golf and played other sports, but decided to go back to golf in 11th grade.  Well, he'd shot up something like a foot, just like the gymnastics boy, and instead of being 5'2" and the shortest boy on the team, he was 6'0" and one of the taller ones.  He said it was like learning a whole new game, because he'd lost his "feel" with his added length.  He became a powerful driver, but it took him years to relearn the precision he'd had in the short game because he was getting used to how long his arms and legs were again!  I don't think in his case that the golf limited his size at all, though, it was just a teen boy growth spurt.  (Not really relevant, but I also ended up tall in the end--I never "shot up" suddenly, just kept growing when most girls stopped.)

drzim

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 650

The "winner takes all" (or the few who make it to the top levels take all) aspect of competitive sports is one of the reasons why I dislike it. I can't watch it without thinking of all the young people who get told that you will make if you give it your all, gave it their all and just weren't the 0.5% who are able to make it pro. Some sports aren't as bad but others require 100% dedication from a very young age (gymnastics, for example) in a way that I think is harmful to them, whether or not they ever make it to national level. School is often neglected or there is little time for friendship, leisure or finding themselves as people, not just gymnasts. It requires that 12 year olds train while barely recovered from injuries.
My sister's best friend had a son who did gymnastics. When he was about 12, he decided that he didn't want to compete any more. For the next year, he slept about half the time, and then shot up nearly a foot. His doctor said that gymnasts aren't gymnasts because they're small, they're small because they're gymnasts. Fortunately for this boy, he quit early enough that his body could recover and reach its full genetic potential. You have to wonder how many of those little Olympians who start in childhood and compete hard during their teens, would have been tall adults if they'd chosen a different sport.

I had a casual friend (I'll call her Kathy) who was a gymnast all through high school--she was short (probably 5 feet even) and did a lot of serious training.  At some point she realized that she would never be an olympic competitor, and she quit during our senior year.  I specifically remember this because it was so freaky--  during my sophomore year of college I was visiting other friends out of state and Kathy happened to be attending the same college.  I ran into her at a mutual friend's party and she was staring at me eye to eye level.  I'm 5'6" and for years in high school I literally looked down on her (because she was much shorter than me).  I guess after she stopped gymnastics she grew up to her full height. 

Jocelyn

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 3268
I think the explanation is that the child is expending so much energy on training, they can't eat enough to also give them enough calories for growth. And considering how many gymnastic coaches pressure their kids to stay skinny, the poor kids aren't getting enough calories to grow.

Dazi

  • like the flower
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4387
I think the explanation is that the child is expending so much energy on training, they can't eat enough to also give them enough calories for growth. And considering how many gymnastic coaches pressure their kids to stay skinny, the poor kids aren't getting enough calories to grow.

I was going to post this.   

Also,  the year I quit gymnastics, I doubled my body weight and grew so much taller that I had really bad growing pains in my upper legs. I still played sports, but the other sports  were nowhere near the intensity that gymnastics was.
Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





kherbert05

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 10534
    • Trees downed in my yard by Ike and the clean up
I think the explanation is that the child is expending so much energy on training, they can't eat enough to also give them enough calories for growth. And considering how many gymnastic coaches pressure their kids to stay skinny, the poor kids aren't getting enough calories to grow.
From a couple things I've read it also might be they don't have enough fat in their diet also.


My cousin had a heart attack in his late 20's or early 30's- actually 2 back to to back in 48 hours. He was lucky the guy next to him at the gym was a cardiologist, who recognized the symptoms and got him to a hospital. Well when they sent him home the diet he was on was so restrictive in fats that the doctor hammered home 2 points. He needed to stay on the diet to live. His kids (Kinder and elementary aged) could not under any circumstances eat that restrictive of a diet. They wouldn't put on enough body weight to go through puberty. This was especially a concern with his daughter, because girls need a certain amount of body fat to go through puberty. Female gymnasts sometimes don't start their period, until they stop competing.


The flip side of this is we have girls starting their periods in primary school. Not just 4th and 5th but sometimes girls in 3rd or end of 2nd. I had to call 4 girl's parents (2/3 of my girls) last year to strongly suggest they start wearing either bras or at least some type of undershirt because they were starting to develop and boys were making comments. The boys (all older) got in a huge amount of trouble for making the comments.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

jedikaiti

  • Swiss Army Nerd
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2906
  • A pie in the hand is worth two in the mail.
OK, I understand why girls in gymnastics (and any others with low body fat) would not get their period until later. However, I don't understand why girls are starting to get periods so young - I've seen it mentioned elsewhere, but my question is why?
What part of v_e = \sqrt{\frac{2GM}{r}} don't you understand? It's only rocket science!

"The problem with re-examining your brilliant ideas is that more often than not, you discover they are the intellectual equivalent of saying, 'Hold my beer and watch this!'" - Cindy Couture

WolfWay

  • They burnt down my house... They ate my tailor!
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2578
OK, I understand why girls in gymnastics (and any others with low body fat) would not get their period until later. However, I don't understand why girls are starting to get periods so young - I've seen it mentioned elsewhere, but my question is why?
I'd perhaps suggest googling the subject for a variety of views on the subject? I'm fuzzy on where the forum's acceptability boudaries around medical subjects are, so I'm reluctant to say anything at all on the subject.

Can I just point to one study that discusses it from a sociological perspective:

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-stone-age-mind/201202/why-are-girls-getting-their-periods-so-young


« Last Edit: July 17, 2014, 03:47:21 AM by WolfWay »
It's best to love your family as you would a Siberian Tiger - from a distance, preferably separated by bars . -- Pearls Before Swine (16-May-2009)

Venus193

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 16124
  • Backstage passes are wonderful things!
I read a few years ago about how the presence of stepfathers and stepbrothers often does this; I think the article was in Newsweek.  I mentioned this on another forum and someone posted that a divorced friend with three daughters refused even to date because this scared the daylights out of her.

perpetua

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2212
Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #3038 on: October 29, 2014, 07:06:33 AM »
Bit of a grim one, this, but still. Apparently there are grown adults in the world who don't understand the significance of a broken neck.

Unfortunately there was a horrible accident at Blackpool Pleasure Beach this weekend when a man snapped his neck on a rollercoaster ride. He's currently on life support unlikely to survive and completely paralysed from the neck down if he does. Yet on all the news articles, people are posting about him having a "speedy recovery" and saying "get well soon", like he's broken his arm or something.

Sigh. Really?

Psychopoesie

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 978
Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #3039 on: October 29, 2014, 07:30:17 AM »
Bit of a grim one, this, but still. Apparently there are grown adults in the world who don't understand the significance of a broken neck.

Unfortunately there was a horrible accident at Blackpool Pleasure Beach this weekend when a man snapped his neck on a rollercoaster ride. He's currently on life support unlikely to survive and completely paralysed from the neck down if he does. Yet on all the news articles, people are posting about him having a "speedy recovery" and saying "get well soon", like he's broken his arm or something.

Sigh. Really?

Not sure this means they don't get it. It can be hard to express support when something really bad happens - sometimes people fall back on their default for lack of other better words.

What do you think they should they be saying at this point?

perpetua

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2212
Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #3040 on: October 29, 2014, 07:44:34 AM »
Bit of a grim one, this, but still. Apparently there are grown adults in the world who don't understand the significance of a broken neck.

Unfortunately there was a horrible accident at Blackpool Pleasure Beach this weekend when a man snapped his neck on a rollercoaster ride. He's currently on life support unlikely to survive and completely paralysed from the neck down if he does. Yet on all the news articles, people are posting about him having a "speedy recovery" and saying "get well soon", like he's broken his arm or something.

Sigh. Really?

Not sure this means they don't get it. It can be hard to express support when something really bad happens - sometimes people fall back on their default for lack of other better words.

What do you think they should they be saying at this point?

No no, some of them really do not get it. It's hard to explain, really, without quoting the comments. It's in the tone. And they don't *need* to say anything; they don't know the man, these are comments on a news article.

Psychopoesie

  • Member
  • **
  • Posts: 978
Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #3041 on: October 29, 2014, 08:14:35 AM »
Bit of a grim one, this, but still. Apparently there are grown adults in the world who don't understand the significance of a broken neck.

Unfortunately there was a horrible accident at Blackpool Pleasure Beach this weekend when a man snapped his neck on a rollercoaster ride. He's currently on life support unlikely to survive and completely paralysed from the neck down if he does. Yet on all the news articles, people are posting about him having a "speedy recovery" and saying "get well soon", like he's broken his arm or something.

Sigh. Really?

Not sure this means they don't get it. It can be hard to express support when something really bad happens - sometimes people fall back on their default for lack of other better words.

What do you think they should they be saying at this point?

No no, some of them really do not get it. It's hard to explain, really, without quoting the comments. It's in the tone. And they don't *need* to say anything; they don't know the man, these are comments on a news article.

Sad if they really don't get it. Although considering some of the nasty stuff people say in public comments on articles, I'd give them a pass for good intentions at least.

Jones

  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 2673
Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #3042 on: October 29, 2014, 08:28:09 AM »
A friend in high school was in a very bad car accident and broke his neck. We teens all thought that automatically meant he was going to die. Instead, due to the nature of the break, he was back at school a year later and graduated with the class. Walking.

I can see how people who may have known someone who made a miraculous recovery would post hopes that another would as well.

Dazi

  • like the flower
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 4387
Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #3043 on: October 29, 2014, 09:59:19 AM »
A friend in high school was in a very bad car accident and broke his neck. We teens all thought that automatically meant he was going to die. Instead, due to the nature of the break, he was back at school a year later and graduated with the class. Walking.

I can see how people who may have known someone who made a miraculous recovery would post hopes that another would as well.

I personally know three people who have had severe neck breaks that not only survived, but also regained the ability to walk. One was in a car accident, one a horse jump accident, and one got hit by a falling tree. Granted all of them had extremely long recoveries and intensive physical therapy for a very long time.  A neck break doesn't always mean paralysis /death.



Meditate. Live purely. Quiet the mind. Do your work with mastery. Like the moon, come out from behind the clouds! Shine. ---Gautama Buddah





siamesecat2965

  • Super Hero!
  • ****
  • Posts: 8954
Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #3044 on: October 29, 2014, 10:01:02 AM »
I had a friend that was throwing out two week old refrigerated apples. I asked her what the heck she was doing and she told me they were "too old"  to eat now. I totally blew her mind when I told her store bought apples are usually already at least a year old  sometimes nearly two years old. Two weeks in a home refrigerator is not going to make them go anymore bad.

Not sure I would've known exactly how old the produce was before it got to me. Was she throwing them out because they didn't look good to her anymore, or because of some arbitrary two-week threshold she'd picked up somewhere? If the former, I don't see anything wrong with that. I live alone, so if I know I'm not going to eat something, I get rid of it. Like milk past the date on the carton--intellectually I know it's just the sell-by date, not the "milk turns into poison" date, but I know I'm not going to drink it past that date, so I might as well pour it down the drain.

It was just a time range she picked out. I could totally see if she left them in a bowl in the counter and they started going soft and mushy.

I frequently ignore sell by dates. My rule of thumb is it depends on what it is, and how does it look/smell? i have a bottle of Siracha in my fridge i just opened. even though the sell by date was in July. It looks fine, and smells and tastes fine. So until it really goes off, I'm using it.

things like milk and yogurt, I go by the smell/taste test. I opened milk i bought a week ago the other day, a day past the sell by date. it smells and tastes fine.

I do recall my mom though, who would throw out tuna salad she had made the next day if not eaten, and I always thought that was the case. Nope, just her quirk.