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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1524315 times)

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vintagegal

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6135 on: March 18, 2018, 08:44:18 AM »
We recently rescued a dog that has the worst separation anxiety I've ever seen (as evidence by non-stop barking).  After trying some meds that didn't work, the vet recommended a certain high end, non-shocking bark collar.  It worked fine until yesterday and when my housemate got home, she seemed surprised he was so agitated.  It was then I noticed the collar was on the kitchen counter.  I pointed out he probably needs to be wearing it, and she initially denied it!  Then sanity prevailed.  She's a smart woman, but I guess she thought a blinking red light on a counter sent off magical waves to reduce a dog's anxiety.

there was an ad on the local listserv recently - someone selling a bark collar. Reason - "Dog didn't like it."

I thought that was the whole point?

Harriet Jones

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6136 on: March 18, 2018, 04:36:58 PM »
We recently rescued a dog that has the worst separation anxiety I've ever seen (as evidence by non-stop barking).  After trying some meds that didn't work, the vet recommended a certain high end, non-shocking bark collar.  It worked fine until yesterday and when my housemate got home, she seemed surprised he was so agitated.  It was then I noticed the collar was on the kitchen counter.  I pointed out he probably needs to be wearing it, and she initially denied it!  Then sanity prevailed.  She's a smart woman, but I guess she thought a blinking red light on a counter sent off magical waves to reduce a dog's anxiety.

there was an ad on the local listserv recently - someone selling a bark collar. Reason - "Dog didn't like it."

I thought that was the whole point?

Maybe it really *really* didn't like it. To the point it would try to take it off.

gmatoy

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6137 on: March 18, 2018, 04:41:03 PM »
Maybe she's related to the person that a friend came across several years ago. She had to explain to a post office worker that New Mexico is part of the US and not a separate country that requires international postage.  ::)

True story:  my DS's original birth certificate listed my birthplace as Mexico.  Except I was born in New Mexico.  I didn't notice for several years until a nice Canadian border guard asked me about it (DS didn't have a passport then).  Now I have to wonder if the person putting in the information didn't know that New Mexico was a US state and defaulted to the country.

There was/is a magazine about New Mexico, that had an ongoing column about the mistakes many people have made for years, in their assumptions that New Mexico is actually Old Mexico, and hence, not a state.  I have spent hours reading through the archives because they're hilarious!

https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-2-87394/

I'm not sure how far back the column goes, but there are years and years to read through, and laugh yourself to tears with.

I think I've mentioned this before on eHell; and I not being American, there may be factors which elude me -- but it surprises me a bit, that when the US annexed from the nation of Mexico in 1848, the territory of New Mexico (which had had that name under the rule of Spain, and then of independent Mexico): those in charge did not foresee this particular cause of confusion; and give the region some new, other name.  It's a well-known fact as old as humankind, that people can often be not very bright about some things, and get the wrong end of the stick...

And see, I don't even make the connection between Mexico and New Mexico unless I'm thinking about it. I think it has to do with accents and pronunciation. In my head, it's "newMEXico" (all blended as though it's one word), not NEW Mexico. I'm always surprised to hear of people who get confused because, to my ear, they have no relation.

When they were choosing a name for the US state where I've lived all my life, they considered Columbia, but rejected it because of concerns that it would be confused with the District of Columbia. So of course, they named it... Washington.

As a teacher in Washington state, I love teaching that fact to students. There is usually a groan, followed by "Waaiit, what?"

And when we went to Washington, D. C., I cracked up our tour guide by saying, "I'm from the other Washington. The one with representation. And you see where that has gotten us!"

Nuku

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6138 on: March 22, 2018, 06:49:45 PM »
Maybe she's related to the person that a friend came across several years ago. She had to explain to a post office worker that New Mexico is part of the US and not a separate country that requires international postage.  ::)

True story:  my DS's original birth certificate listed my birthplace as Mexico.  Except I was born in New Mexico.  I didn't notice for several years until a nice Canadian border guard asked me about it (DS didn't have a passport then).  Now I have to wonder if the person putting in the information didn't know that New Mexico was a US state and defaulted to the country.

There was/is a magazine about New Mexico, that had an ongoing column about the mistakes many people have made for years, in their assumptions that New Mexico is actually Old Mexico, and hence, not a state.  I have spent hours reading through the archives because they're hilarious!

https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-2-87394/

I'm not sure how far back the column goes, but there are years and years to read through, and laugh yourself to tears with.

I think I've mentioned this before on eHell; and I not being American, there may be factors which elude me -- but it surprises me a bit, that when the US annexed from the nation of Mexico in 1848, the territory of New Mexico (which had had that name under the rule of Spain, and then of independent Mexico): those in charge did not foresee this particular cause of confusion; and give the region some new, other name.  It's a well-known fact as old as humankind, that people can often be not very bright about some things, and get the wrong end of the stick...

And see, I don't even make the connection between Mexico and New Mexico unless I'm thinking about it. I think it has to do with accents and pronunciation. In my head, it's "newMEXico" (all blended as though it's one word), not NEW Mexico. I'm always surprised to hear of people who get confused because, to my ear, they have no relation.

When they were choosing a name for the US state where I've lived all my life, they considered Columbia, but rejected it because of concerns that it would be confused with the District of Columbia. So of course, they named it... Washington.

As a teacher in Washington state, I love teaching that fact to students. There is usually a groan, followed by "Waaiit, what?"

And when we went to Washington, D. C., I cracked up our tour guide by saying, "I'm from the other Washington. The one with representation. And you see where that has gotten us!"

Yeah, I lived in WA state for a while. Not only was that confusing for people who new me before I moved there, but the town I lived in had the name of a much more famous town in my home state.

But I always loved the fact that Charlie Brown named the town of George, Washington.

oogyda

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6139 on: March 24, 2018, 09:36:21 AM »
Maybe she's related to the person that a friend came across several years ago. She had to explain to a post office worker that New Mexico is part of the US and not a separate country that requires international postage.  ::)

True story:  my DS's original birth certificate listed my birthplace as Mexico.  Except I was born in New Mexico.  I didn't notice for several years until a nice Canadian border guard asked me about it (DS didn't have a passport then).  Now I have to wonder if the person putting in the information didn't know that New Mexico was a US state and defaulted to the country.

There was/is a magazine about New Mexico, that had an ongoing column about the mistakes many people have made for years, in their assumptions that New Mexico is actually Old Mexico, and hence, not a state.  I have spent hours reading through the archives because they're hilarious!

https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-2-87394/

I'm not sure how far back the column goes, but there are years and years to read through, and laugh yourself to tears with.

I think I've mentioned this before on eHell; and I not being American, there may be factors which elude me -- but it surprises me a bit, that when the US annexed from the nation of Mexico in 1848, the territory of New Mexico (which had had that name under the rule of Spain, and then of independent Mexico): those in charge did not foresee this particular cause of confusion; and give the region some new, other name.  It's a well-known fact as old as humankind, that people can often be not very bright about some things, and get the wrong end of the stick...

And see, I don't even make the connection between Mexico and New Mexico unless I'm thinking about it. I think it has to do with accents and pronunciation. In my head, it's "newMEXico" (all blended as though it's one word), not NEW Mexico. I'm always surprised to hear of people who get confused because, to my ear, they have no relation.

When they were choosing a name for the US state where I've lived all my life, they considered Columbia, but rejected it because of concerns that it would be confused with the District of Columbia. So of course, they named it... Washington.

With the Columbia River running through the state -- good name for it, I suppose, except for... (as you recount).  No wonder non-Americans often get confused concerning these two different "patches" of the US !

A favourite of mine re US state names, is Idaho.  I've read that there are two alternative versions of the name's origin: (1) it means "the sun coming down from the mountains" in some Native American tongue;  (2) "Idaho" is completely meaningless in any language: it was dreamed up out of nowhere by the gentleman who promoted the territory and its settling -- those doings, and the name, enthusiastically "sold" by him -- he just thought that the name sounded cool !

Growing up in Idaho, we were taught the first origin of the name.  Additionally, it was pronounced "ee-da-how". 

The Washington state versus Washington D.C. thing:  I lived in Washington state for 13 years.  Now, I live near Washington, D.C.  I find I have to be very specific when referencing the state.
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Luci

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6140 on: March 24, 2018, 01:24:43 PM »
I always say Washington State or DC or Washington, Illinois. There’s New York City and New York State, not New York.

Most cities need the state following them. Springfield, Aurora, Jacksonville, Waverly unless we’ve already established the area. Someone posted about Newark the other day. The content didn’t imply which Newark, so I don’t know.

Mikayla

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6141 on: March 24, 2018, 01:51:53 PM »
When I moved to CO 7 years ago, I was really surprised at the way people pronounced obviously Spanish names (there's a strong Hispanic influence here).  Also, I'm fluent in Spanish, so I was always being corrected.  It was me saying it wrong.

Example: Limon CO isn't pronounced like the Spanish word for lemon.  It's pronounced LIE-mun.

Buena Vista is pronounced BEW-na Vista.

Salida is pronounced Sa-LIE-duh.

Some of it isn't even  Spanish.  There's the suburb of Louisville, which is pronounced Lewis-ville.  Weird!

gmatoy

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6142 on: March 25, 2018, 04:35:01 PM »
Maybe she's related to the person that a friend came across several years ago. She had to explain to a post office worker that New Mexico is part of the US and not a separate country that requires international postage.  ::)

True story:  my DS's original birth certificate listed my birthplace as Mexico.  Except I was born in New Mexico.  I didn't notice for several years until a nice Canadian border guard asked me about it (DS didn't have a passport then).  Now I have to wonder if the person putting in the information didn't know that New Mexico was a US state and defaulted to the country.

There was/is a magazine about New Mexico, that had an ongoing column about the mistakes many people have made for years, in their assumptions that New Mexico is actually Old Mexico, and hence, not a state.  I have spent hours reading through the archives because they're hilarious!

https://www.newmexico.org/nmmagazine/articles/post/one-of-our-50-is-missing-2-87394/

I'm not sure how far back the column goes, but there are years and years to read through, and laugh yourself to tears with.

I think I've mentioned this before on eHell; and I not being American, there may be factors which elude me -- but it surprises me a bit, that when the US annexed from the nation of Mexico in 1848, the territory of New Mexico (which had had that name under the rule of Spain, and then of independent Mexico): those in charge did not foresee this particular cause of confusion; and give the region some new, other name.  It's a well-known fact as old as humankind, that people can often be not very bright about some things, and get the wrong end of the stick...

And see, I don't even make the connection between Mexico and New Mexico unless I'm thinking about it. I think it has to do with accents and pronunciation. In my head, it's "newMEXico" (all blended as though it's one word), not NEW Mexico. I'm always surprised to hear of people who get confused because, to my ear, they have no relation.

When they were choosing a name for the US state where I've lived all my life, they considered Columbia, but rejected it because of concerns that it would be confused with the District of Columbia. So of course, they named it... Washington.

With the Columbia River running through the state -- good name for it, I suppose, except for... (as you recount).  No wonder non-Americans often get confused concerning these two different "patches" of the US !

A favourite of mine re US state names, is Idaho.  I've read that there are two alternative versions of the name's origin: (1) it means "the sun coming down from the mountains" in some Native American tongue;  (2) "Idaho" is completely meaningless in any language: it was dreamed up out of nowhere by the gentleman who promoted the territory and its settling -- those doings, and the name, enthusiastically "sold" by him -- he just thought that the name sounded cool !

Growing up in Idaho, we were taught the first origin of the name.  Additionally, it was pronounced "ee-da-how". 

The Washington state versus Washington D.C. thing:  I lived in Washington state for 13 years.  Now, I live near Washington, D.C.  I find I have to be very specific when referencing the state.

Adding to my frustration, when I lived in Queens, NY,  I would talk about how far from home I was. I would say that I was from Tacoma, Washington. And then some one would say that that wasn't so far. They were thinking Takoma Park, which isn't even in Washington, D.C.; it is in Maryland. At first I didn't realize why they thought it wasn't far. I would point out that it was 3,000 miles. I would get a blank stare.

I learned to do a thing with my arm: this is California, here is Oregon, this is Washington state (the hand, with thumb out and fingers bent down, which looks a lot like Washington state) and up here is Canada.  Which also brought up more geography fails. Many people evidently don't know that the United States is not the only country that goes from "sea to shining sea." Many people did not know that Canada could be above Washington state. It was above New York state, they would tell me as if I were the one who need help in locating things.

Dazi

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6143 on: March 25, 2018, 07:16:49 PM »
The other day I had a CW ask if anyone had any Tylenol. I gave her a bottle of generic drug store brand acetaminophen that I had in my bag. CW then argued with me that wasn't Tylenol. I told CW it was acetaminophen which is the same active drug that is in Tylenol. CW was not stating she couldn't take the generic due to inert ingredient issues, which I get, she honestly believed Tylenol was an entirely different medication. ::)

I gave up at that point and told her she was free to either accept my generic acetaminophen or go purchase her own name brand Tylenol, but to please turn the bottle over and look at the active drug listed because it is acetaminophen.
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Sanity Lost

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6144 on: March 25, 2018, 07:38:13 PM »
Some of it isn't even  Spanish.  There's the suburb of Louisville, which is pronounced Lewis-ville.  Weird!

A couple of years ago, I was released early from a temp assignment for that in CO, though it wasn't the only reason. My co-worker was furious that I kept pronouncing it Louee-ville. I learned French and just could never remember to say it any other way. Especially when on the phone and I'm thinking of giving directions to our office; not my co-worker's predilections. (She would snap out "IT'S LEWIS-VILLE while I'm on the phone!). She hated the way I set up my desk, hated the way I pronounced the town of Louisville, despised the way I set up my call log, just a lot of nitpicky things. The final blow was that I was reading in the break room on my break and honestly was not paying attention to anything around me. Didn't even realize she was talking to me, till she snapped at me. About 30 minutes later, I was called into the supervisors office and told it wasn't working out and that it was my last day.

Probably didn't win myself any points when I told the supervisor "Well I just won that bet". She asked me what bet; and I told her that I bet myself a nickel that she was going to cancel my contract, because "A" threw a temper tantrum. I had put up with her sniping for 2 months, and was irritated with it. Honestly, I was relieved and had already spoken to the Temp Agency about finding another position. Unfortunately, the Agency never did find me another position after this; which was surprising to me as I had always had glowing reports back from my other clients and had several call-backs from the same ones.

C'est la Vie




andi

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6145 on: March 25, 2018, 07:56:15 PM »
When I moved to CO 7 years ago, I was really surprised at the way people pronounced obviously Spanish names (there's a strong Hispanic influence here).  Also, I'm fluent in Spanish, so I was always being corrected.  It was me saying it wrong.

Example: Limon CO isn't pronounced like the Spanish word for lemon.  It's pronounced LIE-mun.

Buena Vista is pronounced BEW-na Vista.

Salida is pronounced Sa-LIE-duh.

Some of it isn't even  Spanish.  There's the suburb of Louisville, which is pronounced Lewis-ville.  Weird!

I’m from Texas and spent 2 years in CO - nothing made sense to me!!!

nutraxfornerves

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6146 on: March 25, 2018, 10:37:22 PM »
The other day I had a CW ask if anyone had any Tylenol. I gave her a bottle of generic drug store brand acetaminophen that I had in my bag. CW then argued with me that wasn't Tylenol. I told CW it was acetaminophen which is the same active drug that is in Tylenol. CW was not stating she couldn't take the generic due to inert ingredient issues, which I get, she honestly believed Tylenol was an entirely different medication. ::)

I gave up at that point and told her she was free to either accept my generic acetaminophen or go purchase her own name brand Tylenol, but to please turn the bottle over and look at the active drug listed because it is acetaminophen.

As a side note, not every adult is aware that outside of the US, the drug is known as paracetamol, brand name Panadol.

On another forum, a guy was raving about this incredible painkiller he’d been given by a clinic in South America, and was wondering if it was available over the counter in the US. He was a bit deflated when he found out it was Tylenol. 

Nutrax
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Hmmmmm

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6147 on: March 26, 2018, 09:05:42 AM »
When I moved to CO 7 years ago, I was really surprised at the way people pronounced obviously Spanish names (there's a strong Hispanic influence here).  Also, I'm fluent in Spanish, so I was always being corrected.  It was me saying it wrong.

Example: Limon CO isn't pronounced like the Spanish word for lemon.  It's pronounced LIE-mun.

Buena Vista is pronounced BEW-na Vista.

Salida is pronounced Sa-LIE-duh.

Some of it isn't even  Spanish.  There's the suburb of Louisville, which is pronounced Lewis-ville.  Weird!

I'm not at all bothered by non-traditional pronunciations of names in the US. With the hodge podge of settlements from the French, Spanish, Germans, English and others, it's little wonder that the original pronunciations were lost once most occupants were primarily English speaking. I find the "CRUD MONKEYS!, they don't even know how to pronounce the name of their city correctly" crowd annoying. There's a street in our city called San Felipe that you'll hear it pronounced 3 or 4 different ways. The joke is your pronunciation is based on how many generations your family has lived here. The more generations, the more Anglicized the pronunciation. My son just noticed the small community called Chapel Hill near us is actually spelled Chappell Hill. He spent the other weekend annoying me using the "correct" French pronunciation (thankfully, most of the locals had good humor by it but we did run across a few who had no idea what he meant).

When people make fun of the "mis-pronunciation" of names, I ask them to correctly pronounce the name of the largest city in Louisiana. They'll usually try to imitate the New Orleans dialect with their pronounciation. I then correct them on the actual French pronunciation of Orleans.

Aleko

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6148 on: March 26, 2018, 10:09:58 AM »
Quote
My son just noticed the small community called Chapel Hill near us is actually spelled Chappell Hill. He spent the other weekend annoying me using the "correct" French pronunciation

If that's Chappell Hill Texas, that was actually a 100%-wrong pronunciation, because the name is not from French. It was named for a man called Robert Wooding Chappell; Chappell is an English surname, pronounced 'chapel' (there's a variant spelling, Chapple).

And even if it had originally come from the French word chapelle, the 'correct' pronunciation is still whatever the locals call it. On the edge of the New Forest in southern England is an 800-year-old village called Beaulieu.  This name's French origin is obvious, and if you just read it and knew how to pronounce French you would naturally pronounce it "Boh-lyuh". But you would be wrong, because for hundreds of years it has been pronounced "Byooli" by everyone, and "Boh-lyuh" is simply not its name.

The same is true of New Orleans. If you are speaking about it in French you are free to call it "Nouvelle Orléans" in a fine Parisian accent (as here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xhZ2I45jQY), but that is certainly not the correct way to say it in English.

Hmmmmm

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Re: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People
« Reply #6149 on: March 26, 2018, 10:44:51 AM »
Quote
My son just noticed the small community called Chapel Hill near us is actually spelled Chappell Hill. He spent the other weekend annoying me using the "correct" French pronunciation

If that's Chappell Hill Texas, that was actually a 100%-wrong pronunciation, because the name is not from French. It was named for a man called Robert Wooding Chappell; Chappell is an English surname, pronounced 'chapel' (there's a variant spelling, Chapple).

And even if it had originally come from the French word chapelle, the 'correct' pronunciation is still whatever the locals call it. On the edge of the New Forest in southern England is an 800-year-old village called Beaulieu.  This name's French origin is obvious, and if you just read it and knew how to pronounce French you would naturally pronounce it "Boh-lyuh". But you would be wrong, because for hundreds of years it has been pronounced "Byooli" by everyone, and "Boh-lyuh" is simply not its name.

The same is true of New Orleans. If you are speaking about it in French you are free to call it "Nouvelle Orléans" in a fine Parisian accent (as here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6xhZ2I45jQY), but that is certainly not the correct way to say it in English.

But that was my point. We never know the origin of a name or why it is pronounced differently from the original word. As you noted, it could be that the name or word was Anglicized prior to making it to the States. I find it irritating when people try to tell locals (why my son was having fun irritating me) they are pronouncing a name incorrectly.