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Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 1296733 times)

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Hillia

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At that same publishing company, they wanted to drop the "1/2 cup" and just start saying, "1 stick of butter." I guess for now everybody would know, but it just really bothered me, as a copyeditor.

"Stick" is not a universally agreed-upon unit of measurement.

That would not be cool for those, like me, that have to convert everything. Even a cup of butter is a weird concept, even room temp butter would be a pain to cut in little bits to fill up a cup, squashing it so that it's packed, then emptying the cup and having to clean all the greasy residue.

I printed a handy little guide with metric/imperial measures, C° and F°, and what one cup of flour/sugar/butter/rice.. is in grams, and Oz to Grams...
It's really usefull, I get most of my recipes from tastespotting (and thus mostly english blogs) and since I moved out without taking the measuring cups, I just write it down with the conversion.

My guide is the one from here: http://www.everest.co.uk/products/kitchens/kitchen-cheat-sheet/
free download possible.

In the US butter typically comes wrapped in individual sticks containing 1/2 cup each  The wrappers are marked off in tablespoons so you can easily cut off a smaller amount.

However, as mentioned, this is not universal; I have bought butter that came wrapped in 4 tablespoon sticks.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2013, 11:55:16 AM by Hillia »

Piratelvr1121

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I've come across some Irish recipes that had me looking online for equivalents, such as soda bread or brown bread recipes. They turned out deliciously and I ended up making notes on my recipe.

Also I can understand the stick of butter issue.  Now and then, since it's more pricey than usual butter, I treat myself to some Kerrygold Irish butter.  I think it's about $5, but it's thicker than your usual stick so I have to look at the little measurements on the side to use the right amount. 
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

ladyknight1

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  • Not all those who wander are lost
When we need a large quantity of butter, I buy it in a 4 lb pack of pound blocks. I use a bench knife to divide the one I am working on, and use a scale when baking to ensure perfect results.

I have had to tell my fellow college students that the group discussion portion of our class discussion posts (online) is part of the grade. We are all required to discuss the topic in order to receive full credit. The other students are extremely resistant to the idea, so the discussion board looks like a monologue! I want to keep my A, which is hard to attain in a 3000 level, 6-week, summer course!
“All that is gold does not glitter, Not all those who wander are lost; The old that is strong does not wither, Deep roots are not reached by the frost."
-J.R.R Tolkien

Browyn

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I have two of these (a large and a small) and I think mine are from Alton Brown's collection.  They have metric as well as old fashioned measurements on them.

http://tinyurl.com/push-measure-cup



They are so good for things like shortning, peanut butter, anything sticky and I bet they would be good for butter too.


WillyNilly

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I just re-encountered this bit that I think every adult should know... but a surprising number either don't seem to know or don't care about: double doors for temperature control.  Aka: when holding a door is the rude thing to do.

Often in the winter or yesterday at a spa with numerous saunas, including an "ice sauna", there are two doors, and inner and outer. These are to keep the cold out (or in). So you go through one, let it close (or at least mostly close) and then you open the next. But invariably there are people who open the first door - as wide as possible no less - and hold it wide open for the next person while opening the next door - as widely as possible - thus holding both doors wide open. Very often this is the same person, or group of persons, who like to stop and chat while holding the doors open, or pause to hold the doors (both) for a straggler. Its incredibly rude in its selfishness, and quite honestly just stupid behavior - do people honestly not realize there is a reason for the two sets of doors? I mean even if you've never seen it before, it seems like common sense to figure out.

camlan

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Passed on this little lesson today.

Gasoline is flammable. It is also not a good idea to attempt to increase the amount of fire in your charcoal grill by holding a can of gas over the flames and pouring it on.

Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


cwm

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I just re-encountered this bit that I think every adult should know... but a surprising number either don't seem to know or don't care about: double doors for temperature control.  Aka: when holding a door is the rude thing to do.

Often in the winter or yesterday at a spa with numerous saunas, including an "ice sauna", there are two doors, and inner and outer. These are to keep the cold out (or in). So you go through one, let it close (or at least mostly close) and then you open the next. But invariably there are people who open the first door - as wide as possible no less - and hold it wide open for the next person while opening the next door - as widely as possible - thus holding both doors wide open. Very often this is the same person, or group of persons, who like to stop and chat while holding the doors open, or pause to hold the doors (both) for a straggler. Its incredibly rude in its selfishness, and quite honestly just stupid behavior - do people honestly not realize there is a reason for the two sets of doors? I mean even if you've never seen it before, it seems like common sense to figure out.

I see this all the time at the zoo too, in the aviaries. I had to explain to some random woman WHY they did this with free-roaming animals in the enclosures. It only came up because her young child had read the notice on the door to let one set close before opening the other. She really thought it was to limit the number of people going in at once. I had to calmly explain (directly to her child, loud enough for her to hear) that it was because they didn't want any of the animals running away.

Softly Spoken

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Passed on this little lesson today.

Gasoline is flammable. It is also not a good idea to attempt to increase the amount of fire in your charcoal grill by holding a can of gas over the flames and pouring it on.

 :o

I...I think we've officially morphed into a new Brain Hurt thread.  :P  ;)
"... for there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so."
-William Shakespeare

"We find comfort among those who agree with us - growth among those who don't."  ~Frank A. Clark

Sharnita

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Passed on this little lesson today.

Gasoline is flammable. It is also not a good idea to attempt to increase the amount of fire in your charcoal grill by holding a can of gas over the flames and pouring it on.

Was anybody seriously hurt or were you able to pass this information on before anything bad happened?

Piratelvr1121

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I hope before and that the one holding the gas can wasn't one of those "Hold my beer and watch this!" sorts.
Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars.  You have a right to be here. Be cheerful, strive to be happy. -Desiderata

blue2000

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  • Two kitties - No waiting. And no sleeping either.

At that same publishing company, they wanted to drop the "1/2 cup" and just start saying, "1 stick of butter." I guess for now everybody would know, but it just really bothered me, as a copyeditor.

"Stick" is not a universally agreed-upon unit of measurement.

That would not be cool for those, like me, that have to convert everything. Even a cup of butter is a weird concept, even room temp butter would be a pain to cut in little bits to fill up a cup, squashing it so that it's packed, then emptying the cup and having to clean all the greasy residue.

I printed a handy little guide with metric/imperial measures, C° and F°, and what one cup of flour/sugar/butter/rice.. is in grams, and Oz to Grams...
It's really usefull, I get most of my recipes from tastespotting (and thus mostly english blogs) and since I moved out without taking the measuring cups, I just write it down with the conversion.

My guide is the one from here: http://www.everest.co.uk/products/kitchens/kitchen-cheat-sheet/
free download possible.

If you want a cup of butter and don't want to squash it, get a two-cup measurement and put one cup's worth of water in. Then put enough butter in to raise the volume of water to the two cup level. Voila! A measured cup of butter and much less to clean!
You are only young once. After that you have to think up some other excuse.

Mel the Redcap

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Passed on this little lesson today.

Gasoline is flammable. It is also not a good idea to attempt to increase the amount of fire in your charcoal grill by holding a can of gas over the flames and pouring it on.

Ooh, you reminded me of one!

It is not a good idea to use petrol (gasoline) as a weed killer. For one thing, it doesn't work. It is REALLY not a good idea to try to use it on your neighbour's passionfruit vine (that you want to kill because it's growing over the fence and you're too much of a Special Snowflake to talk to them about) if said passionfruit vine is growing right next to their gas water heater. The pilot light will ignite the petrol as it evaporates, and there will be a loud BOOM and fireball as you walk away, and the firemen are going to be really snarky at you.
"Set aphasia to stun!"

gramma dishes

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Passed on this little lesson today.

Gasoline is flammable. It is also not a good idea to attempt to increase the amount of fire in your charcoal grill by holding a can of gas over the flames and pouring it on.

Many many years ago, shortly after we moved into our house we were eating dinner one night and heard fire trucks and all kinds of other sirens.  At first we thought they were just passing by on one of two busy streets that are about five blocks away in different directions, but they sure sounded awfully close.

It turns out that a few of our neighbors were having a barbeque in one of their back yards and the impatient kids thought coals weren't getting hot fast enough.  In just a flash, a boy about nine years old grabbed a can of lighter fluid and squirted it into the coals.  The fire caught the stream of liquid on fire and sucked it back into the can which then exploded. 

The boy survived but was very horribly scarred on his face and it did a lot of damage to his one hand.  It was horrible and so sad.

camlan

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Passed on this little lesson today.

Gasoline is flammable. It is also not a good idea to attempt to increase the amount of fire in your charcoal grill by holding a can of gas over the flames and pouring it on.

Was anybody seriously hurt or were you able to pass this information on before anything bad happened?

Somehow they thought gas was like the lighter fluid some people use on charcoal grills, but in a very brain hurty twist they also thought it couldn't catch fire. If this makes no sense to you, it doesn't to me, either.

Fortunately for everyone involved, I came across this group, which was mostly the new young people who moved in downstairs and a few of their friends, before anything happened. I noticed the gas can and gently inquired as to why it was there. Once informed of their plans, I'm afraid I turned into a little mother hen, and all adulty and serious, and managed to talk them out of it.

I guess they'd all seen charcoal fires lit before, but never really paid attention.

Since they've already had the fire department here once and they've only been in the place three weeks, I'm very happy I happened to walk by them.

Oh, and I got a very good hamburger as thanks!

Nothing is impossible, the word itself says, “I’m possible!” –Audrey Hepburn


Fliss

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  • Australia - the land that time forgot.

Back in my wayward and misspent youth, I was in the Oz Army (the family swear it must have been a typo error), where we learnt many interesting little tricks -- only a few of which I would dare try these days.

One of these little tricks was to  have a a packet of tounge dispensers that had been soaked in petrol. You kept it in a metal pencil case in your back pouch. You used 2 or 3 to get a fire going when you needed to heat up food or morning coffee. Good little trick.
Good news! Your insurance company says they'll cover you. Unfortunately, they also say it will be with dirt.