Author Topic: An Adult Should Really Know This - Silly Things You've Had to Tell People  (Read 303844 times)

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kherbert05

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Then the roku wasn't working, and the modem was off line.

What is "roku"? Thanks.
The device I use to watch netflix, amazon instant, hulu plus and other channels from the internet on my TV. www.roku.com I'm a cord cutter.
Don't Teach Them For Your Past. Teach Them For Their Future

Luci

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Then the roku wasn't working, and the modem was off line.

What is "roku"? Thanks.

Roku is short for 'roku box' a device used for getting netflix, hulu plus, and other alternate TV programming.

Ahh. Another tech vocabulary word I needed to know.

stitchygreyanonymouse

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Then the roku wasn't working, and the modem was off line.

What is "roku"? Thanks.

Roku is short for 'roku box' a device used for getting netflix, hulu plus, and other alternate TV programming.

Ahh. Another tech vocabulary word I needed to know.

Technically a brand name. Roku, Apple TV, I think Sony has one, and then of course most Bluray players and many newer TVs have internet connections that allow you to stream things from the web.

cwm

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Not so much telling people, but true story. In high school, I was in the marching band. One day at a football game, there were some sirens. Word came down from the tuba players (top of the bleachers) to come up and see what was going on, so the whole band swarmed to the top of the bleachers to look out over the parking lot. Two cars were on fire. At the next break in play, the announcer asked for the owner of those two cars to meet the firefighters at the entrance to the field.

Apparently one group of people was tailgating in an empty parking spot and instead of actually properly disposing of their coals, they just put a piece of cardboard on top of them. And then walked away. Someone else parked in the parking spot on top of the burning coals, and both of their cars caught fire. As a band member it was epic to watch them burn, but I can't imagine how they explained it to the fire crew.

ladyknight1

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Not only was the parking lot busy at my doctor's office today, people double parked (behind other cars) and the bank next door got robbed! I was so glad to get out of there.

Please don't double park!

katycoo

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I can't imagine how it would stay lit in a thunderstorm.

I've never had one go out - the burners or whatever are protected inside the outer casing, and they tend to be situated in corners or behind other structures (garden shed, decorative wall, hedge etc) that protect them from wind. :) In fact, the only one I remember hearing of where the pilot light went out was the one involved in the petrol -> boom -> firemen scenario, where it was so thoroughly drowned that the electric igniter failed completely and had to be replaced!

Back when I was a small child, we had an electric water heater in the back of the linen closet, with shelves in front of it so your towels etc were always warm, but since then all the ones I can remember have been outside. It's a safety thing, I think, and I believe houses here in Australia are far less likely to have basements than ones in the U.S. so that's not usually an option for us.

(ETA: the Mythbusters episode where they built a miniature house and fired a water heater through its roof was awesome :D)

I've had the pilot go out, but not due to weather.  Sometimes they just go out.  Its only ever happened once.

I've never seen a house in Australia with a basement.  The only indoor water heaters I've seen are in apartment blocks.

dawnfire

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I can't imagine how it would stay lit in a thunderstorm.

I've never had one go out - the burners or whatever are protected inside the outer casing, and they tend to be situated in corners or behind other structures (garden shed, decorative wall, hedge etc) that protect them from wind. :) In fact, the only one I remember hearing of where the pilot light went out was the one involved in the petrol -> boom -> firemen scenario, where it was so thoroughly drowned that the electric igniter failed completely and had to be replaced!

Back when I was a small child, we had an electric water heater in the back of the linen closet, with shelves in front of it so your towels etc were always warm, but since then all the ones I can remember have been outside. It's a safety thing, I think, and I believe houses here in Australia are far less likely to have basements than ones in the U.S. so that's not usually an option for us.

(ETA: the Mythbusters episode where they built a miniature house and fired a water heater through its roof was awesome :D)

I've had the pilot go out, but not due to weather.  Sometimes they just go out.  Its only ever happened once.

I've never seen a house in Australia with a basement.  The only indoor water heaters I've seen are in apartment blocks.

I grew up in Melbourne and the house we had had an indoor water heater it was built in the mid 70's by the time it died in about 1990, indoor heaters were very rate (I think there was only 2 models on the market).

we currently have a solar/ instant hot water system. The system is not bad but the solar part is a bit troublesome. In the 3 years we've had this house (got it new) we've had the solar panel burst and the pump (that pumps the water to the panel) die.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2013, 04:58:47 AM by dawnfire »

Fliss

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Time out, please. You have water heaters outside?

Your concept of basements are fairly rare in Oz. As are several of the more . . . 'weird' things I've read people talk about here.

We have an outside gas heater (it replaced the wood copper in the laundry about 25 years ago. Not joking), and while they don't often go out, ours does about 3-4 times a year. Perth has some serious winds called 'catabriatics' that like to roar up to the escarpment and swirl around like mad, often for days on end. Where we are, this means our suburb is very practised in restarting the heaters.

They're very safe, and if something does go wrong, they're always situated on a garage or bathroom wall or something non-disasterous.
Good news! Your insurance company says they'll cover you. Unfortunately, they also say it will be with dirt.

Fliss

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What everyone really should know about diamonds. It's obvious when you think about it.

http://au.businessinsider.com/why-diamonds-are-a-sham-2013-3
Good news! Your insurance company says they'll cover you. Unfortunately, they also say it will be with dirt.

iridaceae

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Your concept of basements are fairly rare in Oz. As are several of the more . . . 'weird' things I've read people talk about here.

We have an outside gas heater (it replaced the wood copper in the laundry about 25 years ago. Not joking), and while they don't often go out, ours does about 3-4 times a year. Perth has some serious winds called 'catabriatics' that like to roar up to the escarpment and swirl around like mad, often for days on end. Where we are, this means our suburb is very practised in restarting the heaters.

They're very safe, and if something does go wrong, they're always situated on a garage or bathroom wall or something non-disasterous.

You're lucky; you have a climate where it's feasible. It isn't in much of the US- it gets too cold. I can't imagine trying to deal with a hot water heater that's outside when it's blizzarding or 30 below zero.


Fliss

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You're lucky; you have a climate where it's feasible. It isn't in much of the US- it gets too cold. I can't imagine trying to deal with a hot water heater that's outside when it's blizzarding or 30 below zero.

Australia has all that and manages. (puzzled) You don't really think it's all sunshine and sunny days, do you?
Good news! Your insurance company says they'll cover you. Unfortunately, they also say it will be with dirt.

Mel the Redcap

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You're lucky; you have a climate where it's feasible. It isn't in much of the US- it gets too cold. I can't imagine trying to deal with a hot water heater that's outside when it's blizzarding or 30 below zero.

Australia has all that and manages. (puzzled) You don't really think it's all sunshine and sunny days, do you?

Well, not 30 below. Not here, certainly. ;) But it definitely gets below freezing in winter where I am, we get some truly monumental storms, and I've seen water heaters outside at ski resorts where you'll definitely get blizzards; I guess a lot of it is what you're used to.
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iridaceae

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You're lucky; you have a climate where it's feasible. It isn't in much of the US- it gets too cold. I can't imagine trying to deal with a hot water heater that's outside when it's blizzarding or 30 below zero.

Australia has all that and manages. (puzzled) You don't really think it's all sunshine and sunny days, do you?

Well I didn't actually think you got 5 feet of snow a year which hung around for months and at times stayed below zero for weeks, no.

oogyda

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Just yesterday, Oogydad had to tell an adult that while it was possible to drive around those giant piles of gravel in the road, he probably shouldn't.  Those large signs he already drove around said "Road Closed" for a reason. 

Recent flooding badly damaged a small bridge and badly undermined the roadway leading up to it. 

Yes, that means you have to make a 10 minute detour, but isn't that a better option than possibly having the road under you crumble?
It's not what we gather along the way that matters.  It's what we scatter.

ladyknight1

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Just like the people who drove over the sparking, crackling and moving power line when it was down on our road. We had notified authorities and blocked the road with our car, but people went around us to drive over it.